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Full text of "Quincy Sun July - Dec 2000"

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Historic Quinc^j's Hometown Weekly Newspaper 





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MICROFILMED 2001 
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Asian Victim's 
Advocate Set 

— Page 3 — 


State Street 
Germantown Friend 

~ Page 1 3 ~ 


WEATHER FORECAST 

Thursday: Partly Sunny, Highs 75 p ., 
Friday: Partly Sunny, 70's ^ . 
Saturday: Partly Sunny, 75-85 P ^ 







The Quixicy ^^ 

Historic Quincy's Hometown Weekly; Newspaper 




VOL. 32 No. 41 



Thursday, July 6, 2000 



'Happy Birthday, Americat 




UNCLE SAM ROUNSEVILLE with two hands full of 
the 4,000 miniature American flags he distributed free 
here and fai other New England areas over the Fourth of 
July weekend. Appropriately, he is shown here in firont 



of the Franklin St. birthplace of John Adams who 
played a m^jor role with Thomas Jefferson in 
producing the Declaration of Independence. 

(Harry Brett/Image Photo) 



Would Ease Tax Burden 
On Commercial Property 

Sheets Will 
Submit 169 % 
Classification 

Next Year 

By CRAIG SALTERS 

Mayor James Sheets has told Quincy business 
leaders that he will submit a 169 percent tax 
classification for commercial property next year, 
down six points from the state maximum 175 
percent currently in place. 



House Approves $100,000 
For Town Brook Flood Project 



Funding legislation pro- 
posed by Cong. William 
Delahunt earmarked for the 
Town Brook flood protec- 
tion project has been ap- 
proved by the U.S. House of 



Representatives. 

The House approved 
$100,000 to complete the 
final stage of the Town 
Brook flood protection proj- 
ect in Quincy and Braintree 



— specifically to continue eluding: 

reconstniction of the Quincy • $500,000 for mainte- 



Dam, which began in 1992. 
In addition, Delahunt 
advocated funding for other 
projects in his district, in- 



nance dredging in Plymouth 
Harbor's federal channel, 
which is critical to the 
(Cont 'd on page 28) 



Sheets told a meeting of 
the Quincy Business Coun- 
cil last week that he would 
submit a 169 percent tax 
classification for the city's 
commercial, industrial, and 
personal property (CIPP). 

"What I told them (the 
QBC) was that I will present 
the same tax classification 
as I presented for this year 
and that I was hopeful the 
council would pass it," 
Sheets explained. 

In December of 1999 
Sheets did submit a 169 
percent tax classification for 
the city's commercial prop- 
erty but, by a 4-3 vote, the 
City Council voted to in- 
crease the classification to 
the state maximum of 175 
percent. 



The change was pro- 
posed by Ward 2 Councillor 
Daniel Raymondi who said 
the move would shift $1.2 
million of the city's tax bur- 
den off the shoulders of 
homeowners. 

Councillor Timothy Ca- 
hill, who voted for the 
amendment, said at the time 
the increase was a "one shot 
deal" which was needed for 
the bailout of then Quincy 
Hospital. 

A special meeting to re- 
consider the vote the next 
week lasted only a few min- 
utes when a vote to discuss 
the issue failed, angering 
many business leaders who 
had come to speak against 

(Cont 'd on page 3) 



Where John Hancock Declared His Love 

Dorothy Quincy Homestead 
Is Closed To Visitors 



By TOM HENSHAW 

One of Quincy's most 
popular and romantic his- 
torical treasures was closed 
to visitors over the busy 
July 4 holiday weekend and 
apparently has been since 
the tourist season began in 
May. 

And no one is quite sure 
if or when the Dorothy 
Quincy Homestead at the 
comer of Butler Road and 
Hancock Street will open 
again. 

A Quincy woman, who 

visited the house three times 

in June and July to show 

visitors from New Jersey, 

- reported that a sign on the 



Homestead door said only, 
"Enjoy the Grounds." 

The house on the banks 
of Furnace Brook, where 
John Hancock wooed and 
won Dorothy Quincy's 
hand, is owned by the MDC 
but operated by the Massa- 
chusetts Society of Colonial 
Dames under a 99-year 
lease. 

Pat Flynn, a spokesman 
for the MDC, said the last 
he heard was that the Dames 
were seeking a new care- 
taker couple to live in the 
house and show visitors 
around. 

Colonial Dames Presi- 
dent Julie Guild was not 
available for comment. 



The oldest part of the 
house was built in 1685 by 
Col. Edmund Quincy II on 
land that was granted to 
Edmund I in 1638. The 
major part added in 1706 by 
Edmund III. 

It was acquired and re- 
stored with vintage furni- 
ture, utensils and clothing 
by the Colonial Dames in 
1904 and given to the state. 
The Dames retained a lease 
which expires in 2004. 

Flynn said the MDC is 
responsible for the upkeep 
of the grounds while the 
Colonial Dames have 
charge of maintenance in- 
(Cont'd on page 2) 




DOROTHY QUINCY HOMESTEAD 



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Page 2 Thm Quiaoy Suxk Thursday, July 6, 2000 



Dorothy Quincy Homestead Is Closed To Visitors 



(Cont'd from page I) 

side the stately old mansion. 
In previous years, the 
Homestead was open to the 
public May through Octo- 
ber, Wedneday through 
Sunday, from 12 noon to 5 



p.m. and by appointment 10 
a.m. to 12 noon for groups. 
Admission was $3 for adults 
and $1 for children. 

in the days prior to the 
Revolution, the house was 
the home of Edmund 



Quincy IV and the social 
center of Old Braintree, 
mostly because Edmund had 
five beautiful daughters. 

The youngest, the viva- 
cious Dorothy, was be- 
trothed to a Quincy boy. 



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John Hancock, a wealthy 
young Boston businessman, 
already a leader of the reb- 
els, who was to be the first 
to sign the Declaration of 
Independence in a bold hand 
"so that King George can, 
read it without his specta- 
cles." 

Still visible on a window 
pane of the Homestead are 
the words "You I Love and 
You Alone," scratched by 
John Hancock with his dia- 
mond ring as he prepared to 
flee to Lexington with the 
British on his heels. 

Special wallpaper with 
blue cupids and pink flow- 
ers was imported from 
France for the marriage of 
Dorothy and John but the 
war intervened. 

Eventually, they were 
wed but it was at the home 
of Thaddeus Burr, uncle of a 
future vice president, Aaron 
Burr, in Fairfield, Conn., on 
Aug. 28, 1775. 



Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 





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Any Item in our 

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Reg. price, $1.99 & up only. 

Prices good now thru Wed.. July 12, 1000 

One coupon per customer. 



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• 1 dozen large eggs • I quart of West Lynn Orange Juice 

• I gallon of West Lynn Milk (1 %,2% or fat free) 

• Your Choice of the Boston Globe or Herald 

Offer valid while supplies last, one special per coupon. We resen<e the ri^t to limit quantities. Valid Sunday 7/9/00 only. 

Valid only at 475 Hancock Street, North Quincy location. . 

Your Osco in North Quincy, a one-stop store 
committed to your neighborhood. 

Gas, Electric and Phone Bills also accepted. (Mon-Fri 9am-3pm) 





THIS SIGN WELCOMES visitors to the Dorothy Quincy 
Homestead, but the historic site is closed. 

(Harry BreUllmage photo) 



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by George P, Murphy 

As heard on WJDA Radio, 1300 AM every Thursday at 11:00am! 

QUEBEC CITY 

Beautifully preserved and the It's always nice to know your neigh- 
only fortified city in North America, bors and this is especially true of our Ca- 
Canada's Quebec City is an exquisite nadian neighbors to the Jiorth. Loolc to 
historic place to visit. The city can eas- PRIME TRAVEL, your good neighbors 
ily be seen on foot, with some won- hert in Quincy, for good ideas on where 
derfiil alpine views atop the city walls to go and what to see. As travel advisors 
or at its highest point, Cap Diamant, to our community, we've been lucky 
near the Citadelle. Upper Town and enough to get to know many wonderful 
LowerTown are divided by steep rock places and meet fascinating people all 
that has been carved into 25 different around the world. Take advanUge of our 
staircases. In Upper Town, see the experiences - we're happy to share them 
city's impressive historic and politi- with you here at 500 Victory Road, Ma- 
cal buildings, many of which have rina Bay. PH: 617-472-3697. 
copper roofs and towering steeples. P.S..- Outside the city walls, Eglise 
Morrin College, Chateau Frontenac St. Jean Baptiste, 
and the Ursuline Convent are all Quebec Museum and 
worth a visit for their beauty and his- the Plains of Abraham 
tory. Lower Town, or Basse- Ville, is are excellent sites to *' 
more modem, featuring shops, bou- visit 
tiques, restaurants and art galleries. 




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Thur§day,July6,2000 Tl»« Qulaey Sun Page 3 



DA'S Office Set To Get W 
Asian Victim's Advocate 



A bilingual victim advo- 
cate for the Asian commu- 
nity will be added to the 
staff of District Attorney 
William R. Keating 's staff, 
possibly by the end of the 
summer, under a federal 
Victims of Crime Act grant. 

"We have been working 
to expand our contact with 
the Asian community 
throughout Narfolk County 
and expand of support net- 
work," said Keating. 

"This is a very important 
step, both in the service we 



will be able tq offer in court 
and in the additional out- 
reach services we will be 
able to provide." 

The grant, which is dis- 
tributed through the Massa- 
chusetts loffice for Victims 
Assistance, totals $39,212 
for fiscal 2001, which 
started July 1. 

"This new advocate will 
both do direct services in 
court and and perform out- 
reach services to the Asian 
community," said Keating. 
"Specificallv. that will mean 



doing prevention, education 
and intervention work on 
hate crimes and domestic 
violence." 

The Asian community in 
Quincy now exceeds 20 per 
cent of the city's population 
of roughly 88,000. 

Some 51 Quincy resi- 
dents graduated from the 
first class of the Asian Citi- 
zen's Academy, a joint ef- 
fort by Keating and Police 
Chief Thomas Frane aimed 
at reaching out to the Asian 
community. 



Sheets Will Submit 
169 % Tax Classification 



(Cont'd fmm page I) 
the tax shift. 

Sheets, citing the need to 
send out city tax bills on 
time to avoid a cash flow 
problem, approved the 
amended tax plan. 

Sheets described the 
meeting with the QBC, the 
local arm of the South Shore 

Chamber of Commerce, as a 
friendly, productive one and 
said the classification issue 
was only mentioned for a 
moment or two as part of an 



overall discussion on prop- 
erty values, which are ex- 
pected to rise. 

Tax classification, a 
method of shifting the over- 
all tax burden from residen- 
tial to commercial property, 
multiplies actual commer- 
cial property value by a per- 
centage (in this case, 175 
percent) and adjusts the fig- 
ures accordingly. 

Without any tax classifi- 
cation, the city's tax burden 
would be split roughly 77 



percent residential and 23 
percent commercial. 

With the 175 percent tax 
classification, that burden 
changes to roughly 60 per- 
cent residential and 40 per- 
cent commercial. 

Until the change, the tax 
classification had been set at 
169 percent since the early 
1990's. 

Current tax rates are 
$15.71 residential and 
$35.25 commercial per 
$1,000 valuation. 



9 Residents Receive Academic Honors At Bentiey 




Nine Quincy residents 
received academic honors at 
Bentiey College for the 
spring semester. 

They arc; 



President's List: Sarah pakis, Edison 
Horvath and Benjamin Mak. Wan Yang. 

Dean's List: May Chan, 
Michelle Do, Jimmy Ta^, 
Kamei Toye, George Tsi- 



Wong and 



COOLING OFF DURING the Squantum Association Fourth of July festivities Sunday are 
Justin Keenan, LUy Keener, and Shannon Glynn. (Quincy Sun Photo/Joseph Curran) 




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Piiige4 TlwQuinoytaan Thuraday, July 6, 20M 



Opinion 




USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co. inc. 

1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. Publisher 
Robert H. Bosworth Editor 

35c per copy. $16.00 per year by mail in Quincy 
$1 8.00 per year by mail outside Quincy. $22.00 out of state. 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Periodicals postage paid at Boston, MA 

Postmaster Send address change to 

The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy MA 02169 

The Ouincy Sun assumes no financial responsibility for typographical errors in 
advertisements but will reprint ttiat part of an advertiaemenl in which tfie typographical 
error occurs. 





.wf. 



By Henry Bosworth 



A Report From 
Senator Kennedy 

Paid Family Leave 
Makes Sense 



By SEN. TED KENNEDY 

Under a new federal 
regulation, finalized this 
week, states may elect to 
provide paid parental leave 
for employees who want to 
take time olH from their job 
to care for a newborn or 
newly adopted child. 
The federal regulation 
authorizes states to use their 
unemployment insurance 
trust funds for paid parental 
leave. This is a sensible idea 
whose time has come. 

It is vitally important for 
employees who are parents 
to be able to care for their 
newborn and newly adopted 
children, without putting 
their jobs at risk. Since its 
enactment in 1993, federal 
legislation has helped mil- 
lions of Americans by pro- 
viding up to 12 weeks of 
unpaid leave a year to care 
for a newborn or adopted 
child, with a guarantee that 
their jobs will be there when 
they return to work. 

But many workers do not 
take the leave because they 
can't afford to go without a 
. paycheck. A recent feport 
by a bipartisan commission 
showed that the loss of a 
paycheck during unpaid 
leave prevents two-thirds of 
eligible employees from 
taking the leave when they 
need it. For many citizens in 
Massachusetts and across 
the country, taking leave 
means losing a paycheck 
and possibly missing a 
mortgage payment or going 
without other necessities. 
No parent should be forced 
to make such difficult 
choices, especially when 
faced with the jobs and dif- 
ficulties of being a new par- 

Parents deserve an af- 
fordable, realistic way to 
take family leave. That is 
why many of us in Congress 
urged President Clinton to 
allow states to use their un- 
employment insurance trust 
funds to provide paid leave 
for new parents. This new 
federal regulation will help 
parents to spend crucial time 
with their newborn or newly 
adopted children, instead of 
continuing to work because 
thev cannot afford to lose 
their paycheck. 



The federal regulation is 
entirely voluntary. Each 
state will evaluate its unem- 
ployment compensation 
system and decide whether 
to implement the new bene- 
fit. The voluntary nature of 
this effort ensures both the 
preservation of a sound un- 
employment insurance sys- 
tem in each state and the 
opportunity to provide paid 
parental leave. 

Using unemployment 
insurance to fund paid pa- 
rental leave makes sense. 
An important goal of the 
unemployment insurance 
system is to increase work- 
ers' attachment in the work- 
force. The system was 
originally established as a 
safety net at a time when 
men were the sole bread- 
winners in most families. 
Since then, women have 
been entering the workforce 
in record numbers, and the 
unemployment insurance 
system should evolve to 
meet the changing needs of 
American families. In to- 
day's economy, where both 
mothers and fathers work, 
paid parental leave funded 
through unemployment in- 
surance is an effective way 
to help meet the real life 
challenges faced by new 
parents. 

This initiative is good for 
workers and for business. 

Many states, including Mas- 
sachusetts, have substantial 
surpluses in their unem- 
ployment insurance system. 
Paid parental leave provides 
workers with a realistic op- 
portunity to take the leave 
they need. It strengthens 
workers' attachment to the 
workforce, and it increases 
their loyalty, productivity 
and morale. Without paren- 
tal leave, employers face the 
costs of high turnover and 
low morale. 

It is gratifying that Mas- 
sachusetts is likely to be the 
first state to act under this 
new federal regulation. 
Legislation has been intro- 
duced in both houses to use 
the state unemployment 
insurance trust fund to pro- 
vide paid leave to Massa- 
chusetts workers who are 
new parents, and I look for- 
ward to its enactment. 



Joanne Dondero decided to do it herself. 
She just got tired of tourists and local customers 
coming into her Quincy Sq. gift 
shop ~ Abigail's Crossing - and 
asking the same question: 

"Do you have any Quincy post- 
cards?" 

And she just got tired of hav- 
ing to tell them: "No, I'm sorry. 
The old ones are pretty scarce and 
there aren't any new ones." 

But now there is a new one. 

Joanne had it created herself 

It shows the statue of Abigail Adams and her young 
son, John Quincy Adams, the future sixth President, 
which stands beside historic First Parish Church. 




DONDERO 



About Time: A New Quincy Postcard 

from Abigail's Crossing. 

The four-color card features a photo of the statue 
taken by John Black of Presidential Camera. "Presi- 
dential" seems an appropriate touch, too, since Abigail 
was the wife of one president, John Adams, and the 
mother of another, John Quincy Adams. 

The figures of Abigail at age 32 and John Quincy at 
10, are in a cut-out over the background of an original 
American flag with 13 stars and the words "QUINCY, 
Massachusetts" and set in an early American gold mir- 
ror-like frame. 

A very attractive card. 

"I was really ashamed to have to tell people that we 
didn't have any Quincy postcards," says Joanne. 

"I thought it was disgraceful. Think of all the his- 
toric sites we have here and no new postcards showing 
any of them." 

There have been a limited number of old cards with 
old photos, she notes. 

She has a few cards of pictures of John and John 
Quincy Adams. 

"But tourists," she says, "want a card showing 
Quincy and the words Quincy, Massachusetts to mail 
back home." 

She also has found cards of the Adams Mansion but 
says they feature an old photo. 

Her Abigail Adams statue card, she believes, is the 
first new Quincy card in 30 or more years. 

She commissioned the printing of 2,000 of them and 
is selling them at 75 cents each. She says she is willing 
to wholesale some of them to other Quincy outlets. 

Those attending last week's dedication of the Abigail 
Adams statue got a preview of the new card. And got 
to take one home. Joanne distributed them free. 

Reaction to the card has been so good, she plans to 
do a series of updated postcards of Quincy 's historic 
sites and other landmarks. 

The series would include the Adams Birthplaces, the 
Adams Mansion, First Parish Church, Dorothy Quincy 
Homestead, the Thomas Crane Public Library and Ma- 
rina Bay and other sites. 

The Adams Birthplaces are an example of the need 
to update the postcards. The old cards, if you can fmd 
one, show them when they were painted red. The cot- 
tages have since been restored to their original look 
under the U.S. National Park Service. 

Joanne hopes it won't be long whpn tourists come 
in and ask if she has Quincy postcards that she will be 
able' to say: 

"Yes, we do. Which one would you like?" 




QUINCY'S NEW POSTCARD 

And, it may be the beginning of a whole new series 
of Quincy postcards. 

The statue is an appropriate starter for Joanne since 
it is also located just across Hancock and Temple Sts. 



Summer Institute For Talented 
Students Opens July 10 



The Quincy Public 
Schools 19th annual Sum- 
mer Institute for talented and 
motivated students will be 
held July 10 through Aug. 
18. 

The program serves stu- 
dents entering kindergarten 
through Grade 9. 

Enrollment is filling but 
there are openings for stu- 
dents entering Grades 5 
through 8 at North Ouincy 
High School. 

Classes still available are: 
Bon Voyage (French), Buen 
Viaje (Spanish), Computers, 
Chemistry Lab, Art Studio 



Workshop, Scales, Fur and 
Feathers, Polytastiques I & 
II and Creative Photography. 

There are two programs at 
the Beechwood Knoll 
School with openings begin- 
ning July 24 through Aug. 4 
for students entering Grades 
2, 3 & 4. Tile programs are 
Nature Ke.'pers and Awe- 
some Art. 

There are openings for 



Water Works! at the 
Squantum School for stu- 
dents entering Grades 5 & 6 
and Ocean Exploration at 
Central Middle School be- 
ginning July 24 through Aug. 
4 for students entering 
Grades 5 through 8. 

Students will be accepted 
on a first come, first served 
basis. Enrollment is limited, 

For more information, 



call 984-8737. 

"The institute is ex- 
tremely fortunate to have the 
most caring and enthusiastic 
teachers who are looking for- 
ward to challenging these 
young inquisitive minds," 
said Institute Director Sylvia 
Pattavina. "This is a wonder- 
ful learning experience." 



Have A Quote . 



I never put off tomorrow what I can possibly 
do the day after. 

-Oscar Wilde 




Eagles cant hunt when tfs 
raining. 



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Thursday, July 6, 2000 Tl&e Quinoy Sioi Page 5 



Scenes From Yesterday 



'-•• .i** 




THIS IS A 1930's postcard view of WoUaston beach Howard Johnson's was located just across the boule- 

iooking north towards the WoUaston Yacht Club on vard from where this picture was taken. The Greeting 

the right. The old seawall shown here was built in the Card Shoppe in WoUaston published the postcard. 
1920's and replaced by the present one in 1960. From the Collection of Tom Galvin 



Ri :\i)i Rs Forum 



More Thoughts On The Shopping Cart Issue 



Quincy's 
Yesterdays 

Sweeny Boosts 
College Courses 

By PAUL HAROLD 

School Committeeman Charles Sweeny said he was 
extremely encouraged by the interest shown in the col- 
lege courses that were being of- ____^___,___ 
fered by the school department. 

He noted that while only 1 7 stu- 
dents had signed up for the sec- 
ond round of courses being offered 

in the fall, one hundred inquiries ' 

were made concerning the program. 

Other school committee members were not as enthusi- 
astic as Sweeny as to the future success of the college 
program. Paul Duffy called the experiment a "dismal fail- 
ure. 



Jiily6-12 

1957 

43 Years Ago 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 
This is a letter in response 
to a letter appearing in the 
June 8 edition of The Quincy 
Sun. The letter was entitled 
"Believes Shopping Cart 
Problem Is Getting Worse" 
and was authored by Ms. 
Michelle Boyne-Granskie. 

In responding to the letter 
regarding the ongoing issue 
of shopping carts strewn 
throughout our neighbor- 
hoods, I would like to first 
commend Ms. Boyne- 
Granskie on bringing forth 
her cogent thoughts. Indeed, 
the notion that a private com- 
pany. Stop and Shop, must 
be to blame for the chronic 
illegal confiscation of their 
own property is inherently 
flawed. When we strive to 
punish the law abiding rather 
than punish the perpetrator 
we find ourselves engaging 
in utter futility. We may note 
this strategy at play in our 
city councillors' manage- 
ment of many issues in our 



city. 

When one engages in 
reckless driving resulting in 
a tragic accident, for ex- 
ample, we find that the "rem- 
edy" is invariably a swiftly 
installed set of ostentatious 
traffic lights and restrictive 
signage. This is clearly so- 
cialistic thinking and only 
results in the punishment of 
the law abiding, well driving 
citizen who must incur fur- 
ther delay and gridlock while 
traveling about our city. We 
should propose increased 
policing of the troubled cite 
or area, instead. Our efforts 
must always focus on those 
at fault, not the innocent. 

I would like to expand on 
and take exception with a 
couple of Ms. Boyne- 
Granskie' s points regarding 
the shopping carts issue. In- 
deed, these displaced carts 
are an eyesore in any neigh- 
borhood graced with their 
presence. The claim that they 
pose some sort of a "hazard 



to individuals" strays from 
the key to the argument, the 
fundamental issue at hand. 
In this case, Stop and Shop's 
carts are being routinely sto- 
len. Where they are ulti- 
mately deposited is inciden- 
tal to the fundamental issue. 
It would be appropriate 
for Stop and Shop to pledge 
to encourage and support law 
enforcement actions taken on 
their behalf by our fine city 
police officers. They may 
even choose to publicize the 
increased efforts to prosecute 
those who steal carts for pri- 
vate use. Ms. Boyne- 
Granskie's strategy of argu- 
ing on behalf of Stop and 
Stop's potential or actual 
budgetary insults and the 
speculated impact on our gro- 
cery prices is probably both 
naive and overstated. It is 
truly unlikely that the nomi- 
nal fiscal impact of relatively 
few shopping carts in the 
streets will reflect in any way 
on the price of Cherrios in 



WoUaston. 

Lastly, the proposal that a 
committee be formed to ad- 
dress this issue is utterly pre- 
posterous. Ms. Boyne- 
Granskie argues quite effec- 
tively that what we have here 
is a simple case of people 
who steal not being held ac- 
countable. She goes on to 
purport, however, that a com- 
mittee be formed, presum- 
ably to sort out the mysteries 
of this issue! She states that 
"we" need to teach people 
right from wrong! Who, pre 
tell, is "we"?! Is "we" the 
government? Is "we" Stop 
and Shop? Is "we" you and I? 
Isn't it reasonable to expect 
people to know "right from 
wrong" without "our" help? 
Rather, shouldn't we spend 
our energies holding people 
accountable to their adher- 
ence thereof? Besides, I'm 
still busy teaching people to 
be "nice." 

Mike J. Denaro 
Quincy 



A 'Thank You' For Letter Carrier Food Drive Success 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 
The annual Letter Carrier 
Food Drive, which was held 
May 13, was a tremendous 
success. Letter carriers all 
across the nation promote this 
day, encouraging people to 
leave non-perishable food out 
to be picked up by the carri- 
ers for distribution to local 
food pantry agencies. 

The Quincy Crisis Center 
was one of the local agencies 
that benefited from this food 
drive. There was excitement 
in the air as volunteers 
worked together through the 
day picking up the food from 
the local post offices, unload- 
ing it at the Crisis Center, 
and then sorting it to the pan- 
try shelves and to boxes for 
storage. The total amount of 
food that the Crisis Center 
received from this food drive 
was 5,585 pounds. The food 
will be used for distribution 
throughout the summer 



months. 

"Thank you" to everyone 
in Quincy who participated 
in this food drive. Special 
thanks go to the letter carri- 
ers who have "extra duty" to 
do on this day. They not only 
lighten their letter bag by dis- 
tributing the mail, but they 



then fill it up again with the 
donated food. Thank you for 
doing this with such a posi- 
tive attitude and a smiling 
face. Thank you to each per- 
son who donated food. 

This event embodies the 
Quincy Crisis Center's mis- 
sion of "advancing a culture 



of compassion" — those who 
gave are responding to help 
those who are in need, neigh- 
bor to neighbor. The Quincy 
Crisis Center, and those we 
distribute to, say "thank you." 
Kathi Garrison 
Program Assistant 
Quincy Crisis Center 



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"We were told they would be breaking down the doors 
to get in," he said. 

Committee members Dr. Joseph McDermott and A. 
Wendell Clark questioned the financial stability of the 
program noting that there was only a few hundred dollars 
left in the college courses account. 

Sweeny's hope was that the program would eventually 
evolve into an independent two-year junior college. 
PERMIT GRANTED FOR NEW ROXIE'S 

Building Inspector Alrick Weidman granted a building 
permit for the constmction of a $75,000 stmcture at the cor- 
ner of the Southern Artery and Canal St. to house a new 
I^oxie's supermarket. It was expected that the current Roxie's 
in the basement of the Bargain Center would relocate to the 
new location. 

Martin Rubin, one of the three brothers who operated 
Roxie's in Quincy and Roxbury, said he was drawn to the 
Southern Artery site because of the city's plans to widen 
both Southern Artery and Canal St. 

Also granted a permit this week was the Archbishop of 
Boston for a new entrance to St. Joseph's Church at a cost of 
$9,000. 

BARRETT ELECTED HEAD OF STATE BAR 

Quincy Atty. Raymond Barrett was elected president of 
the Mass. Bar Association making a pay increase for state 
superior and supreme court judges his first priority. 

Barrett said the current salary of $ 19,000 was too low for 
judges and not in line with other states, for example New 
York. He praised the recent appointment of Quincy 's Paul 
Reardon as head of the superior courts, noting that he was 
making unpopular but necessary changes. 

Two other initiatives Barrett wanted addressed during his 
presidency was the defense of indigent clients and the es- 
tablishment of a continuing education program for lawyers. 

In reflecting on his 32 years of practicing law in the city, 
he said he missed the "formal and colorful figures" that made 
the practice in Quincy Court particularly enjoyable. 
QUINCY-ISMS 

City Manager Edward Lewis announced that the city re- 
ceived approval from the state Emergency Finance Board to 
transfer funds from the Broad Meadows School account to 
the Atlantic Junior High School account. The extra money 
was needed for the new North Quincy school because six 
homes had to be taken, adding $80,000 to the original esti- 
mates. . . Councillor Edna Austin was the only council vote 
for urban renewal in the city. Many rumors were floated re- 
garding its impact on Houghs Neck. One claim was that under 
urban renewal of new housing. . . W. Robert Kilboum was 
the winner of the Tirrell cup from the Quincy Community 
Flayers. Mrs. Rudolph Oberg was the club photographer. . . 
Irving Saltzman and the former Evelyn Cohen returned from 
their honeymoon in Bermuda. . . Members of the Young Adult 
Fellowship of the Houghs Neck Congregational Church were 
engaged in "clean-up, paint-up" project at the church. In- 
cluded were Robert Johnston, William Riepke, Dianna Gor- 
don and Carol Schuerch. . . The members of the board of 
directors at the Jewish Community Center included Elliot 
Davidson, Mrs. Albert Slate and Mrs. Sumner Hirshberg. . . 
Past exalted mler of the Quincy Elks, Joseph Brett, was a 
delegate to the national convention in San Francisco. . . At 
Quincy City Hospital, a daughter was bora to Mr. and Mrs. 
Gino Marini of East Squantum St. and a son to Mr. and Mrs. 
Harold Williams of Gilmore St. . . The only candidates fil- 
ing nomination papers for city council to date were incum- 
bent Carl Anderson and Joseph Halter of Independence Ave. 



rnn^mmr 



Paiei Tift* QuiiM^ 8«u& Thunday.Jiily^flMO 




String Bean/Zucchini Fritter 



Over the Memorial Day weekend, we 
had our usual buffet/open the pool day. 
Even though it was pretty cool, some of 
those little darlings still took a dip. 

One of the foods I prepared for this 
bash was a fritter I usually cook with 
string beans which is everyone's favorite. 

However, there was this small zucchini 
in the refrigerator too small to make 
anything big out of, so I decided to shred 
it and add it to the string beans. It was a 
terrific blend. 

String Beao/Zucchlni Fritter 
1 large can string beans (cut in smaller 
pieces) 

1 anall zncdiini (shredded) 
2eggs 

2-3 tablespoons Bisquick or flour 
1/2 cup grated cheese 
VegeUUe oil (a bit of oliye oil can be 
mixed with the vegetable oiL) 



salt and pepper to taste 

In a bowl, place the string beans, and 
with a knife, just cut Uuough making them 
in smaller pieces. Add the zucchini, and 
the rest of the ingredients. The mixture 
should resemble pancake mix when 
you're ready to cook them. If it seems 
watery, add a bit more flour. If dry, add a 
little water. 

In a frying pan, in the hot oil, drop by 
the tablespoons and cook, turning until 
brown on both sides. Drain on paper 
towel, and keep in a warming oven until 
ready to eat. They are also great as an 
aj^tizer. 

(P.S. Whenever I cook any of my own 
creations, I hardly ever use measuring 
spoons, but when the recipe is printed, I 
try to estimate just how much I've used. 
So sometimes, you have to know by the 
look or feel of a nape,) 




Summer Concert 
Series Aboard USS Salem 



NEWEST DESIGN ADDITIONS of the popular Cat's Meow collection was recently 
introduced at an open house at Abigafl's Crossing, 1356 Hancock St, Qnincy Center. Cat's 
Meow Vniage creator FaUne Jones (right) made a pcnonal appearance and sigBcd pnrchades. 

Joining her is Joanne Dondero, owner of Abigail's Crossing. This year's special annual 
celebration piece is the Humane Sodety Tree. Abigail's Crossing wffl donate a portion of the 
sale to a local humane society. The shop is an offldal membership center carryhig a complete 
Une of Cat's Meow ViUage items whidi inchide custom designs depicting Qufaicy, MDton, 
Braintree and Boston. 

Irish Folk Singer To Open 
Library Lawn Concerts 



The musical sounds of 
blues, Irish, disco, country, 
folk-rock, the 1940's, 
Broadway, and even Elvis, 
will echo from the deck of 
the USS Salem this sunmier 
as the heavy cruiser 
launches its first annual out- 
door summer concert series. 

Each Sunday afternoon, 
beginning July 9 and run- 
ning dirough Sept. 10, in the 
shadow of the ship's heavy 
guns, the Salem will host 
some of the region's best 
performers. 

The concerts begin at 2 
p.m. Admission is $6 for 
adults and $4 for children 
and seizors. Price includes a 
tour of the ship. Acts sched- 
uled to appear include: 

July 9: The Yardrock 
presents Basic Black Blues 
Band, featuring the best in 
red-hot blues. 

July 16: The O'Reilly's, 
one of the area's best Irish 
bands. 



July 23: The Yardrock 
presents Steve Murphy & 
the Yardrockers. 

July 30: Platfonn Soul, a 
7-piece dance band with 
horns, taking audiences 
boogying back to the days 
of 1970's disco and funk. 

Aug. 6: Hot Spot Caba- 
ret, featuring Broadway 
favorites, '40s & '50s. 

Aug. 13: Scott Douglas 
& the Memphis Connection, 
celebrating Elvis' binhday 
with a concert tribute to The 
King. 

Aug. 20: Dave Foley 
Band, "Outstanding Country 
Act" (Boston Music 
Awards). 

Aug. 27: Les Sampou, 
local favorite offering the 



best in folk and rock. 

Sept 10: For Sentimen- 
tal Reasons, returning to the 
USS Salem with their out- 
standing Worid War H USO 
Show, after attracting close 
to 350 people on the ship 
this past Memorial Day 
weekend. 

The USS Salem, a 
17,000 ton heavy cruiser, is 
at the Fore River Shipyard, 
ju$t off Rte. 3A, next to the 
For* River Bridge. Use the 
main entrance off the bridge 
rotary near the Harbor Ex- 
press. The Salem is open 
seven days a week, from 10 
a.m. to 4 p.m., and can be 
reached by calling (617) 
479-7900, or on-line at > 
www.uss-salem.org. 



The Thomas Crane Pub- 
lic Library's Omcerts oa the 
Lawn series will begin 
Thursday, July 20 widi Tom 
O'CarroU, a Dublin bom 
folk singer. 

O'CarroU presents "Irish 
Music: Songs and Stories" 
from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. on 
the library's front lawn for 
both adults and children. 

Krisanthi Pappas, a 
swing/jazz vocalist, will be 
accompanied by a jazz 
combo in concert July 27 in 
a medley of swing and jazz 
standards. 



Guitarist Michael Nix 
will present "Lutes and 
Limbeijacks" Aug. 3. His 
interactive presentation 
features guitar, lute and 
banjo for listeners of all 
ages. 

The concert series con- 
cludes with INCA SON 
performing the music of the 
Andes Aug. 10. INCA SON, 
a music and dance ensemble 
that dresses in authentic and 
colorful Inca attire, will per- 
form both traditional songs 
and original compositions. 
TlMir concert will appeal to 



all ages. 

All concerts are on 
Thursdays from 12:30 to 
1:30 p.m. Concert-goers are 
welcome to bring lawn 
chairs, blankets, and picnics. 
In case of rain the concerts 
will be held at the Adams 
Shore Branch Library, 519 
Sea St. Both sites are acces- 
sible, and concerts are free. 

They are funded in part 
by the Quincy Cultural 
Council, a local agency 
supported by the Massachu- 
setts Cultural Council 



Quincy Art Association 
Offering Summer Classes 



Pat Maloney In Thayer Musical 

Quincy resident and a musical staged recently in 



Thayer Academy Middle 
School student Pat Maloney 
was in the cast of "You're a 
(jood Man, Charlie Brown," 



the school's Thompson 
HaU. 

Maloney is a member of 
theaassof2005. 




The Quincy Art Asso- 
ciation will offer sunmier art 
classes for both diildren and 
adults. 

Children may sign up for 
a summer 'art adventure 
where they will learn tech- 
niques in drawing, water 
color, papermache, clay and 
collage. All materials will 
be supplied. 

Classes will run from 
July 17 through July 28. 



Arrangements can be made 
for morning, afternoon or all 
day sessions. Half days are 
$60 and all day sessions are 
$110 per week. 

Call the Quincy Art As- 
sociation at 617-770-2482 
to register. 

Adults may sign up for a 
clay class at the Onter, 24 
High School Ave. 

This is a wide ranging 
course which will be tai- 
lored to the individual stu- 



dent It is geared to the be- 
ginner and intermediate 
level. A variety of glazes are 
offered, as well as under- 
glazes. 

Materials and firing are 
included in the price of $65. 
There are four sessions: July 
3, 10, 17, and 24. Classes 
wiU run from 12:30 to 2:30 
p.m. 

Call the (Juincy Art As- 
sociation at 617-770-2482 
to register. 



Caitlin Maloney Wins Second 
Prize In MWRA Essay Contest 



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Caitlin Maloney of 
Quincy, a sophomore at 
Archbishop Williams High 
School, won second prize in 
an essay contest at the re- 
cent 18th annual Massachu- 



setts Water Resources 
Authority Awards Cere- 
mony at the Federal Court 
House in Boston. 

The MWRA conducted a 
statewide essay contest 



asking students to write 
about and offer solutions to 
the statistic that there are 
1,000 households in the 
state living without indoor 
plumbing. 




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Thunday, July i, 2000 TIm <|ulnoj- Sun Pige7 



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Social 



Adams Historical Park \ 
Summer, Fall Events 



The Revolutionary War 
and the early days of the 
Republic will be on display 
for the public this summer 
and fall at the Adams Na- 
tional Historical Park. 

Tuesday, July 11 - A 

wreath from President Bill ; 
Clinton will be placed at the 
crypt of John Quincy 
Adams, the sixth president 
of the United States, on his 
233rd birthday. The Mendi 
Bible, a gift to Adams from 
the African people in appre- 1 
ciation of his efforts on be- , 
half of the Amistad cap- ' 
tives, will be on exhibit in 
the Stone Library. 

The event will be held at 
12 noon in United First 
Parish Church, 1306 Han- 
cock St. Admission is free. 

Sunday, July 23 - The 
Park, along with the Castle 
Island Association and the 
MDC will collaborate to 
present a program high- 
lighting the contributions of 
citizens during th^ Civil 
War. It features martial mu- 
sic, historical characters, 
Civil War reenactors, period 
games and old fashioned 
refreshments. 

The event will be held 
from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. ati 
Castle Island in South Bos- 
ton. Admission is free. 

Friday, Aug. 25 - The 
Park will waive the usual 
entrance fee and conduct 
parkwide tours in honor of 
Founders Day, the day the 
National Park Service was 
founded. 

The event will be held all 
day at the Old House, 135 
Adams St. Admission is 
free. 

Sunday, Sept 10 - The 
Park will host a celebration 
of the Victoria Era (the Gay 
Nineties) with lawn games, 
period entertainments and 
refreshments. Guests are 
invited to come dressed in 
Victorian finery. 

The event will be held 
from 12 noon to 4 p.m. at 
the Old House, 135 Adams 
St. Admission is free but 
guests should call 617-770- 
1175 for reservations. 

Sunday, Sept. 17 - The 
public is invited to play a 
role in the passage of the 
United States Constitution 
by the Constitutional Con- 
vention on Sept. 17, 1787.. 

Members of the audience 
assume the roles of dele- 
gates to the convention and 
represent their states in de- 
bates. Afterward, each dele- 
gate will sign the document. 



ring the Liberty Bell and 
receive copies of the U. S. 
and Massachusetts Consti- 
tutions to keep as a mo- 
mento. 

The event will take place 
at 2 p.m. at the Old House, 
135 Adams St. Admission is 
free. 

Sunday, Oct 8 - Visitors 
are invited to picture them- 
selves as patriot refugees in 
1775 fleeillg British- 
occupied Boston, They will 
meet Colonial characters, 
investigate Colonial life- 
styles, help with farm 
chores, and practice military 
maneuvers with a captain of 
militia who "pays" them. 
Patriots will celebrate with a 
cup of cider and a slice of 
liberty ca)ce. 

The event will be held 
from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the 
Adams Birthplaces, 133 & 
141 Franklin St. Admission 
is free but visitors are urged 
to call 617-770-1175 for 
reservations. 

■ . \- 

Friday, Oct 20 & Sat- 
urday, Oct 21 - A two-day 
program of dramatic per- 
formances, lectures and de- 
bates offering perspectives 
on the nation's first partisan 
presidential election in 1800 
and a prospective on the 
presidential election of 
2000. 

The program will be pre- 
sented at 7 p.m. Friday and 
12 noon to 7 p.m. Saturday 
at a location to be an- 
nounced. Admission is free. 

Saturday, Oct. 28 - 
Visitors will be taken on a 
candlelight tour of one of 
New England's oldest burial 
grounds. Historic figures 
will come back to life to 
share their experiences in 
the community. The pro- 
gram will be followed by 
refreshments of cider and 
angel's or devil's food cake. 

The tours will take place 
from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. in 
the Hancock Cemetery on 
Hancock Street and re- 
freshments will be served 
across the street at United 
First Parish Church. 




FONTBONNE ACADEMY English teacher Gcraldin^ Maus 
(right) celebrates her Teacher of the Year Award with 
JosephiDc Ferico, CSJ, assistant to the president at 
Fontbonnc Academy. Sr. JoseplUne was Mrs. Maus' middle 
school teacher at St Mary of the Hills in Quincy. 

Geraldine Maus 

Receives Teacher 

Of The Year Award 

Fontbonne Academy Mrs. Maus was among 

English teacher Geraldine an elite group of teachers 

Maus of Quincy was re- fi'om across the country to 

cently selected as Teacher receive the 2000 Teacher of 



of the Year as part of the 
Wal-Mart Foundation's 
Teacher of the Year Pro- 
gram. 

She was nominated by 



the Year Award. Selected 
for demonstrating excel- 
lence in teaching, recipients 
receive a plaque, a com- 
memorative Wal-Mart 



Fontbonne Principal Sharon Teacher of the Year vest, 

and a $550 education grant 
to be applied toward their 
classroom efforts. 

Mrs. Maus has been 
teaching English at Font- 
bonne Academy for more 
than five years. She is a 
Fontbonne Academy 
alumna, class of 1970. Two 
of her daughters, Christine 
and Siobhaun, are also 
Fontbonne graduates and a 
third, Caroline, will enter 
her junior year at Fontbonne 
this fall. 



Gouveia and her peers. 

"This award recognizes 
teachers who go above and 
beyond — mentors, moti- 
vators and innovators — the 
kind of teachers who make 
learning fun and exciting," 
Gouveia said. "Mrs. Maus is 
known as a teacher with a 
flair for the dramatic, whose 
classroom strategies help 
students experience and 
appreciate 'what they 
read... she was a natural 



choice." 

Mr., Mrs. Kenneth Parlee 
Parents Of Daughter 

Karen and Kenneth Par- ijam and Margaret Corliss 
lee of Pembroke, are parents of Quincy, and Wayne and 
of a daughter, Madison Lucy Parlee of Braintree. 
Katherine bora May 25 at 
South Shore Hospital, 
Weymouth. She joins a 
broUier, William and a sister 
Samantha MacKenzie. 

Grandparents are Wil- 




LAURA JANOWITCH of Quincy recently took part in 
Thayer Academy's stage production of Robert Lawlor's 
'Much Ado About Murder,' which was held in the school's 
Frothingham Hall. Janowitcb is a member of Thayer's Class 
of 2001. (Chris Bernstein Photo) 



Marianne Murphy Engaged 
To Philip Clatworthy 



William T. and Lillian C. 
Murphy of Wollaston, an- 
nounce the engagement of 
their daughter, Marianne 
Murphy to Philip Clat- 
worthy of England. He is 
the son of Norman and Joy 
Clatworthy of W. Sussex, 
England. 

Miss Murphy graduated 
from North Quincy High 
School and U/Mass Boston 



with a BS in management. 
She is employed as a coor^^ 
dinator at Eidetics Research, 
Boston. 

Mr. Clatworthy Rradu- 
ated from Blundell's School 
in Devon, England and is 
employed as a senior con- 
sultant at Garfit Clowes in 
Surrey, England. 

An October wedding is 
planned. 




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Thursday, July 6, 2000 



BA' 






At Broad Meadows 

students Work Locally To Aid Children Globally 



By RON ADAMS 

(Ron Adams is a Language 
Arts Teacher at the Broad 
Meadows Middle School and 
an advisor to the Operation 
Day 's Work Program) 

You are seeing the future 
of youth service if you have 
noticed groups of blue and 
yellow shirted young people 
raking, planting, and clean- 
ing historic sites in the city. 

If you look more closely, 
you'll also see those same 
students volunteering across 
Quincy at nursing homes, at 
food pantries, anywhere else 
they see a need. 

The unique feature of 
their work is that these 
youth also see need in 
communities thousands of 
miles away. 

The blue and yellow 
shirts are emblazoned with 
the words "Operation Day's 
Work-USA," which is the 
name of their student run 
program. Many of these 
students have been involved 
before in community service 
projects through church, 
school, and scouting pro- 
grams. However, all have 
agreed to move youth serv- 
ice to the next level, namely 
global service. 

The students' strategy is 
to help improve their own 
community and, at the same 
time, to help educate poor 
children in other countries. 
Putting community and 
gtobai service together is the 
essence of Operation Day's 
Work-USA. 

Students in Operation 
Day's Work first select and 
perform "sponsored" com- 
munity service projects. 
Armed with a pledge sheet, 
students enlist neighbors, 
family, and parent's co- 
workers to "pledge" mone- 
tary support for each com- 
munity service project com- 
pleted. 

Students select which 
service projects they'll at- 
tempt. Once a project, like 
the cleanup of the Thomas 

Crane Public Library 
Grounds, is completed, stu- 
dents return to their spon- 
sors and collect their 
pledges. One hundred per- 
cent of the money collected 
goes to establish a new edu- 
cational project in a devel- 
oping country of the stu- 
dents' choice. 

Unlike conventional 
community service, the 
fruits of the young people's 
local labor will extend far 
beyond this community, all 
the way, for example, to an 
orphanage the students have 
voted to build in El Salva- 
dor. 

Last year, through Op- 
eration Day's Work, stu- 
dents raised funds for aid 
and education to poor famir 
lies in rural Haiti. One 
"Day's Work" done here 
may result in a lifetime of 
change for hundreds of poor 
children in developing 
countries. It is the goal of 
the young people in Opera- 
tion Day's Work-USA to 
bring new educati<Mal op- 
portunities to their peers in 
one developiag country 
each year. 

Each year, $^^ vote 
on 



help. Students then accept 
from non-governmental 
organizations proposals for 
establishing a new, sustain- 
able, educational program in 
that country. The students 
believe that breaking the 
cycle of poverty is complex, 
but education is a key to 
ending poverty. One of the 
founders of Operation Day's 
Work, Mary Bloomer^, age 
12, a student at Broad 
Meadows Middle School, 
said, "This is not charity. 
We are youth, helping 
youth, to help themselves." 

In 1999, participating 
students in six states raised 
$31,000 which was enough 
to provide literacy, seeds, 
and livestock to over 2000 
poor families in rural Haiti. 
This year, as the number of 
participating U.S. schools 
has grown to 31 schools in 
14 states, the goal has been 
increased to $90,000. 

This year, the students 
chose to build an orphanage 
school for 300 children, all 
victims of the brutal civil 
war in El Salvador. In addi- 
tion to helping the youngest 
victims of the civil war in El 
Salvador, the Quincy stu- 
dents have decided to also 
launch a service project on 
the grounds of Boston Col- 
lege, in memory of the Jes- 
uit priests and other relig- 
ious leaders who were mur- 
dered by rebels during the 
civil war in El Salvador. 

Operation Day's Work- 
USA is student run and 
open to students of all ages. 
Quincy 's Broad Meadows 
Middle School is one of the 
six founding schools of Op- 
eration Day's Work-USA. 

Co-founder Evelyn 
Mclnnes, an eighth grade 
student at Broad Meadows 
Middle School, said, "This 
program gives youth a 
chance to take action and to 
stop sitting back and 
watching bad things happen 
to the world. The coolest 
thing about being in ODW- 
USA is that work we do in 
our communities and our 
fundraising helps thousands 
of children's lives. For me, 
to know I've done some- 
thing like that gives me the 
greatest feeling." 

According to Elizabeth 
Bloomer, another co- 
founder and now a freshman 
at Archbishop Williams 
High School, "Our goal is to 
grow Operation Day's Work 
into schools in all 50 states 
by 2003." 

Creating a new, national 
program is not easy, as the 
students are discovering, but 
high hopes, a big heart, and 
the latest technology just 
might overcome all obsta- 
cles. The State Street Foun- 
dation donated funds to pro- 
vide a state of the art com- 
puter to the Operation Day's 
Work Quincy. 

The students would like 
to thank some of the other 
adults who have been en- 
couraging their efforts to 
improve the Quincy com- 
munity while improving the 

lives of poor children in 
develi^ing countries. 
The ODW founders 




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WURKING HARD to beautify the grounds of the Thomas 
Crane Public Library are Broad Meadows students, from 
left: Evelyn Mclnnes, Genevieve Humez-Rousseau, and 
Nicole Breton-Green. Partially hidden is Fran Ryan, library 
liaison to ODW-USA. 

eyes, ears, and heart in 
Haiti," Peace Corps Volun- 
teer Jeann Robichaud; Con- 
gressman William Delahunt 
(House Foreign Relations 
Committee); Fran Ryan of 
the Thomas Crane Public 
Library; Nanette Canniff of 
the St. Eicniface Hospital in 
Haiti Campaign; the staffs 
of the Eventide Nursing 
Home; The Quincy Crisis 
Center; the Blue Goose of 
The Emmanuel Gospel 
Center of Boston; the Prot- 
estant Social Services Bu- 
reau; Father Bill's Place; the 
Quincy Animal Shelter; and 
the USS Salem in Quincy. 

Technology has helped 
pull the participating 
schools together. For three 
years, Quincy students have 
been communicating weekly 
with other ODW students in 
other states by email, web 
site, and conference calls. 

To spread the word about 
Operation Day's Work-USA 
to other schools, students 
have accepted invitations 
and have given talks about 
the program at: Pine Manor 
College; at a Youth Con- 
gress held last month in 
Puerto Rico; at the Harvard 
School of Public Health; at 
the annual Quincy Martin 
Luther King, Jr., Breakfast; 
at the Boston Public Library 
in Copley Square; on live 
TV on the Massachusetts 
Corporation for Educational 
Television; and at Team 
Harmony V at the Fleet 
Center in Boston. 

Locally, Operation Day's 
Work is being led jointly by 
students from the Broad 
Meadows Middle School, 
Quincy High School, Arch- 
bishop Williams High 
School, the Snug Harbor 
and Merrymount Elemen- 
tary Schools including: 
Migdalia Tracy, Mike 
Quigley, Katie O'DriscoU, 
Katie Sault, Alicia Cappel- 
lano, Evelyn Mclnnes, 



OPERATION DAY'S WORK 2000: A clean sweep on the 
upper decks of the USS Salem. From left are: Jackie Hoang, 
Danielle Woodbury, Rob Mitchell, and Michael Duong, all 
seventh graders at Broad Meadows. 




STILL SMILING after hours of raking, sweeping, and planting, this "Day's Work" detail 
includes Broad Meadows students, from left: Meg Luce; Jenn Cunio; Nicole Breton-Green; 
Shaun Gibbons; John Cappellano; Genevieve Humez-Rousseau; and Evelyn Mclnnes. 



Squatrito, Sarah Murray, 
Amy Donaghue, Roxie Pi- 
card, Rose C. Pierre, John 
Cappellano, Danielle 
DiThomas, Scott Pagington, 
Meg Luce, Colleen Luce, 
Jen Cunio, Cindia Fenelus, 
Jack Fenelus, Deirdre Fla- 
herty (National Board 
Member), Deja Bergstrom, 
Elizabeth Bloomer, Mary 
Bloomer, Axel Quigley, 

Courtney Peterson, Annie 
Keith, Ihsan Essex, Rose B. 
Pierre, David Jacobs, Dan 
Jacobs, Nicole Breton- 
Green, Genevieve Humez- 
Rousseau, Desiree Weiner, 
Rob Mitchell, Jackie Hoang, 
Michael Duong, Shaun Gib- 
bons, Danielle Woodbury, 
Courtney McDonald, and 
Alaina Conso. 

The United States 



Agency for International 
Development (USAID) is 
encouraging young people 
in all 50 states to join Op- 
eration Day's Work, in fact, 
USAID is providing the 
funds for annual summer 
conventions in which ODW 
leaders from every partici- 
pating school can finally 
meet face to face to work 
together to improve their 
program. Last year, the 
meeting was dubbed a 
"Constitutional Convention" 
because participating stu- 
dents elected constitutional 
delegates to formalize the 
program by writing an Op- 
eration Day's Work Con- 
stitution. 

The convention was held 
in steamy Philadelphia in 
July. The site was chosen 
carefully to inspire the 100 



plus students by bringing 
them to Philadelphia, the 
birthplace of the U.S. Con- 
stitution. This year, the con- 
vention will be held in Min- 
nesota. 

To involve your school 
or your child's school, or 
your grandchild's school, or 
for more information, you 
can call Broad Meadows 
Middle School in Quincy at 
(617) 984-8723 or phone 
Paul Austin at USAID in 
Washington, DC at (202) 
712-402L 

The Operation Day's 
Work web site is 
http://odw.info.usaid.gov. 

Donations can be made 
payable to ODW/BMMS 
and mailed to Broad Mead- 
ows Middle School, 50 Cal- 
vin Rd., Quincy 02169. 



Michael Roach Receives College Book Award 



annual Academic Awards 
Night. 

The College Book 

College Book Award at Awards are presented td 

" ■' - ■• .^j students who exi 



Michael Roach of 
Quincy received the Bentley 



dem.cally, participate , 
activities and athletics ai 
CM' and have been recom- 
™«>d^ by faculty mem- 



Thursday, July 6, 2000 Tli« Quisuigr Sua Page 9 



159 Residents Graduate 
U-Mass Boston 



The University of Mas- 
sachusetts at Boston an- 
nounces that the following 
159 Quincy residents re- 
ceived degrees at its recent 
commencement exercises. 

Receiving bachelors 
degrees were: Alicia 
Figueroa, Alix Fan, Allison 
Louise Fox, Amy Bulger, Amy 
Marshall, Angela Marie Marre, 
Angeliki Christie, Ann Lewis 
Hannon, Anthony Graceffa, 
Arvella Hagan, Ayuko Endo 
Donovan, Billy Chiu, Binh Hue 
Long, Brian MacNeil, Carol 
Anne Jay, Carolina Miron, 
Carrie McLellan, Celia Marisa 
Nunes, Charles Hardiman, 
Chimwemwe Clarke, Chioma 
Eberechi Nwachuku, Christina 
Campbell, Christine May Tang. 

Colin Stewart Ward, Con- 
stance Ferguson, Dann Lee 
Brown, David Seghom, David 
Sheridan, Deborah Lyn Col- 
leary, Deborah Marie Wallace, 
Dianne Wallace, Dolores Ann 
Campanale, Dong-hyun Ha, 
Elizabeth Dawn Cosgrove, 
Elizabeth Marrin, Erin Lynn 
Nichols, Erin Margaret Ballum, 
Evan Kiley, Farrawh Charles, 
Faye Kupferman, Francesco 
Peri, Gan Tsu, Hoang Kim 
Dang, Irmasari Christanto, 
Jacinto Real, Jacqueline Mi- 
chelle Freel, Jaime Monahan, 



James Paul Baxter, Janet 
Gilleran, Jason Hertzog, Jason 
Charlemagne Downey, Jason 
Silverman, Jennifer Lynn 
Blaney, Jessica Alter. 

Joonsub Rhee, Joseph Meli- 
costa, Joseph Anthony Papile, 
Joseph Francis Fitzpatrick Jr., 
Judith Angela Austin, Kang 
Heejung, Karen Yee, Karen 
Shea, Kathleen Plett, Kelly 
Goff, Kerry Ann Hodges, 
Kerry Monahan, Kevin Dwyer, 
Kim Hong Ho, Lawrence 
James McFadden, Lee Jae- 
joon, Lisa Tran, Lola Ting 
Tom, Lorella Marinilli, Lu Pei- 
yu, Man Wai Yung. 

Mark Keefe, Marlene Lyons 
Flaherty, Mary Manley, 
Melissa Ottorina Santangelo, 
Michael Tran, Nathan Levine, 
Pamela Holly Berry, Qiao 
King, Quynh-mai Pham, Ryan 
Katides, Sarah Joyce, Sean 
Laurence Avery, Shannon Lyn 
Mcgurty, Sheri Buitenhuys, 
Shu Ling Liang. 

Susan Lemieux, Therese 
Yen Nguyen, Thuy-linh Ho, 
Tran Khuong, Tzu-chen 
Huang, Victoria Kubitschek, 
William Mclntyre Hunt, Wil- 
liam Wojcicki, Xin Ma, Xin- 
hong Chen, Xuan-huong Thi 
Nguyen, Yen Tran. 

Receiving Ph.D.s, mas- 
ters degrees, or certificates 




THE Hll?rOIff CHANNEL 

On July 4, 1776, after a decade of economic conflict with 
Great Britain, the 13 American colonies answered King 
George IITs flat refusal of political reform with a call for rev- 
olution, and the Second Continental Congress officially 
adopted the Declaration of Independence. ... On July 8, 1776. 
the Liberty Bell rang out from the tower of Pennsylvania's old 
State House in Philadelphia, summoning citizens to the first 
public reading of the Declaration of Independence by Col. 
John Nixon. ... On July 4, 1826, John Adams and Thomas 
Jefferson, the second and third presidents of the United States, 
respectively, died on this day, the 50th anniversary of the 
adoption of the Declaration of Independence. ... On July 5, 
1865, in the East End of London, revivalist preacher William 
Booth, with the assistance of his wife, Catherine, established 
the Christian Mission, later known as the Salvation Army. ... 
On July 9, 1877, the All-England Croquet Club at Wimbledon 
staged the world's first lawn tennis championship. ... On July 
6, 11M2, in Nazi-occupied Holland, 13-year-old Jewish diarist 
Anne Frank and her family were forced to take refuge in a 
secret sealed-ofF area of an Amsterdam warehouse. ... On July 
5, 1946, French designer Louis Reyar paraded a model down 
a Paris mnway in a daring two-piece swimsuit. Uncertain of 
what to name it. Reyar spontaneously dubbed it "bikini." 
inspired by news-making U.S. nuclear tests off die Bikini 
Atoll in the Pacific Ocean. ... On July 3, 1971. gamma 
surgery, a revolutionary bloodless method of destroying 
tumors and cancers, was performed in Sweden. ... On July 7, 
1976, women wctc enrolled into the United States Military 
Academy at West Point, N.Y. for the first time in history ... On 
July 7, 1981, President Ronald Reagan nominated Sandra 
Day O'Connor, an Arizona court of appeals judge, to the U.S. 
Supreme Court ... On July 3, 1988, in the Persian Gulf, the 
U.S.S. Vinccnnes shot down an Iranian passenger jet that it 
had mistaken for a hostile Iranian filter aircraft, killing all 
290 people aboard the commercial airline. ... On July 9, 1993, 
Peter Gill of the British Forensic Science Service announced 
that his team had positively identified the remains of Russia's 
last czar, Nicholas II, his wife, Czarina Alexandra, three of 
their five children, and four of their servants. 




of advanced graduate 
studies were: Alexandra Joan 
Ganim, Andrew Dowe, Caro- 
lyn Sullivan, Carolyn Treacy, 
Carolyn Ortega, Guo Hui Li, 
James Tansey, Jennifer Rossi, 
Judith Todd, Karen Marie Kay, 
Leah Rose Giunta, Marie- 
Therese Browne, Mark 
Gorham, Maryanne Teresa 
Mullen, Melanie Doherty, 
Michele Rogers-Goss, Pamela 
Grubb, Pamela Michele Karun, 
Samuel Silva Depina, Susan 
Egan, Tara Stano, Wendy 
Duart, William Patrick Doyle 
III, Arlene Lavin Morrissey, 
Don Tang, Eileen Catherine 
Davis. 

Ernest Ng, Ethel McClel- 
land, Julieanne Doyle, Kath- 
leen Zanga, Kelli Ann Meade, 
Kristian-Andreas Kassimis, 
Linda Totten, Mei-i Lin, Mi- 
chael Ordaz, Minja Oh, Pamela 
Smart Guilmain, Robert Wong, 
Ting Wang, Wan-tzu Tai, Wil- 
liam MacDonald, Xianpeng 
Ning, Yi-chun Lin, Yi-hsuan 
Lin, Ying-ju Shih, Yunxi Chi, 
21hong Liu, Dawn Ruell, Emily 
Foley, Hong Xu, Huikun Tao, 
Nguyen Ngoc Thanh Thao, 
Owen Dyer, Panagiota 
Gounari, Preeti Pabreja, Ruth 
Michelle Ostiguy Meyer, Yang 
Huang. 




GOOD SCOUT AWARDS: Norfolk County Sheriff Michael BelloUi (left, with award) and 
Quincy attorney Thomas Williams (right, with award) received the 2000 Good Scout Awards 
from the Boy Scouts of Quincy at the Mayor's annual Boy Scout Breakfast held recently 
aboard the USS Salem. Congratulating Bellotti and Williams are, from left: Event Co- 
Chairman James Barbieri; Event Co-Chairman and City Council President Paul Harold; and 
Mayor James Sheets. (Quincy Sun Photo/Tom Gorman) 

Health Screening July 12 At Super Stop & Shop 



The Visiting' Nurse As- 
sociation of Boston and its 
affiliate, the Melrose Visit- 
ing Nurse Service, will offer 
a free health screening 
Wednesday, July 12 from 9 
a.m. to noon at the Super 
Stop and Shop, 141 New- 



port Ave., Quincy. 

An agency nurse will be 
available at the screenings 
to monitor blood pressure, 
check glucose levels and to 
answer any questions re- 
garding general health is- 
sues or medications. 



The clinic is open to the 
public and participants do 
not have to be VNA of 
Boston patients to attend. 

For more information, 
call the VNA of Boston at 
(617)464-5161. 



lIlBlcDmB Dr. Kigali 






If! who 



:on^i^^ Street^ 



:% the American 




Compassion 



Oianitv ^ 



IViilton 



92 Highland Strcct/Mikon, MA 02 I 86 617 696-460; 



JlU'l 



i 



Page 10 Tb« Quiaoy Sun Thursday, July (, 2000 




352 On Quincy High Honor Roll 



BRENDAN GAVAGHAN of Quincy, a fifth grade student at 
Sacred Heart School in North Quincy, recently won. first 
place in the Mid-Atlantic Region Fleadh Cheoil 
Championships in the ''button accordion, under 12** 
category at Manhattan College. Brendan will now compete 
in the All-Ireland Fleadh to be held in Enniscorthy, County 
Wexford, this August. Gavaghan is the student of noted 
accordion champion Denis Galvin (in photo). Brendan is the 
son of Al and Susan Gavaghan of Quincy. 

Three Residents Graduate 
Salem State College 



Three Quincy residents 
recently graduated from 

Salem State college. 
They are: 



Karyn Bums, degree in 
psychology; Vanessa Lau, 
degree in nursing; and Ni- 
cole Malhi, degree in nurs- 
ing. 



Sonshine Pre-School 

OPEN REGISTRATION 
for Boys & Girls 

3 and 4 Year Olds 

Meets Mondays-Fridays 

Mornings or Afternoons 

Call 472-2345 for information 

Or sign up At the Salvation Army 

At the Comer of Elm 

and Baxter Streets, Quincy 



Quincy High School lists 
352 students on the fourth 
term honor roll: 

They are: 

DISTINCTION 

Grade 9: Stacey An- 
drew, Jason Bedore, Imani 
Benjamin, Carlos Rock, 
Jessica Buckley, John 
Caballero, Elizabeth Camp- 
bell, Kenneth Campbell, 
Theresa Canale, Alicia Cap- 
pellano, Priscilla Chan, Que 
Chan, James Chiocchio, 
Danielle Christie, Steven 
Coletti, Brendan Conley, 
Ryan Conley, Alaina Conso, 
Megan Davis, Christina 
Diep, Robert Donovan, 
Heather Duffy, Steven 
Ekunseitan, Siham EI- 
hamoumi, Syreeta Essex, 
Stephen Farrell, Stephanie 
Fiandaca, Keith Flaherty, 
Shaun Gibbons, Shaun Gi- 
udici, Jennifer Gropp, Erin 
Herlihy, Allison Hunt, Lau- 
ren Krueger, Judy May 
Kwan, Matthew Lacorte, 
Nicholas Lawrence, Shuling 
Li Tifa, Sixin Lu, Malcolm 
Lynn, Khin Maylin Ma, 
Matthew MacNeil, Robert 
McEvoy, Erica McWalter, 
Meaghan Mooney, Jason 
Moore, Karen Mui, Clara 
Narvaez, Kristine Nelson, 
Sara Neumann, Titi 
Nguyen, Jeffrey Onyeokoro, 
Francis Orlando, Shannon 
Paine, Ashley Peterson, 
Courtney Peterson, Jeanette 
Pimentel, Courtney Rand, 
Anthony Sandonato, Nicole 
Swimm, Jennifer Tan, Hai 
Dang Tran, Bao Truong, 
Lisa Turowski, Khanh Vo, 
Christopher Walker, Li Bing 
Wang, Alycia Weiner, 
Melanie Wolfe, Kenneth 
Yates, Xue Ru Zheng. 

Grade 10: Greia Amarra, 
Lorena Asllanaj, Makena 

Cahill, Kimberly Centeio, 
Wei Foong Chong, Amy 
Chow, Nicole Coleman, 
Matthew Conso, Alyssa 
Costello, Cara Cullen, Mi- 
chael Doyle, Ivan Esposito, 
Kebing Gao, David Ger- 
main, Sara Gordon, Jacque- 
line Greaves, David Grogan, 
Alisa Haidul, Jill Halvorson, 
llda Hanxhari, Tian Hu. 



Hankun Huang, Deshauna 
Johnson, Tsz Kwan Lam, 
Kevin Livingston, Qi Wen 
Michelle Mei, Justine 
Mitchell, Nicole Morrissey, 
Kristin Nelson, Casey Neu- 
mann, Lisa Ng, John 
Mguyen, Minh-Nhat 
Nguyen, Ericks Nieves, 
Z!hristine Niosi, Katrina 
Surmenniemi, Sarah 
D'Neil, Kelly O'Neill, 
Charlene Pascua, Patria 
Peguero, Erika Pettinelli, 
Genesis Quemuel, Bridget 
Reaney, Krystal Rideout, 
Tressa Rogers, Christina 
Roosa, Andrew Ross, Lucy 
Ross, Jennifer Russo, John 
Ryan, Michelle Sheehan, 
Andrew Smith, Albana 
Sula, Jennifer Symonds, 
Peter Tusi, Aline Venturin, 
Vanessa Wong, Weining 
Alan Zheng. 

Grade 11: Leia Amarra, 
Amanda Bagarella, Thomas 
Costa, Kerri Coyne, Patrick 
Delval, Christopher DiCe- 
sare, Michael Gibbons Jr., 
Bidan Huang, Shi Yu 
Huang, Sibiao Huang, 
Stephanie Hutchins, EUaine 
Legaspie, Piro Lera, Ka 
Leung, Jacqueline Lewis, 
Ting Li, Zhen Da Li, Kathy 
Lin, Yin Yin Lin, Kwok 
Lui, John Lupo Jr., Tony 
Mai, Tern McAdam, Mat- 
thew Mormino, Patrick 
Mullen, Brian Neenan, 
Huong Thi Nguyen, Jac- 
queline Niosi, Meredith 
Oldfield, Andrea Pelletier, 
Elton Prifti, Silvia Rios 
Nunez, liana Saxe, Michelle 
Shea, Robert Siqeca, Ben- 
jamin Su, Cheuk Tam, Ngon 
Tran, Svetlana Tur, Shirley 
Wan, Dennis Wong, Ying 
Wu, Dingzhbng Zhang, Bei 
Zhou, Feng Zhu. 

Grade 12: Lawrence 
Antonellis, Robert An- 
tonius. Holly Archer, 
Christopher Baker, 
Geovanina Barros, Fatmata 
Braima, Michelle Catram- 



bone, Xiao Shan Susan 
Chen, Li Ching Chong, 
Charles Clarke, Samantha 
Cohen, Patrick Creedon, 
Jazelle Derbes, Patrick 
Dunner, Marie Fadden, An- 
gela Fu, Thomas Gaeta, 
Amy Gordon, Kerry Gor- 
don, Samuel Green, Jennifer 
Hettman, Changyi Huang, 
Laura Juffre, Michael Kel- 
ley, Jennifer Kern, Ervis 
Kosho, Anisa Kosta, Amy 
Ngar Mei Lai, Katie Larson, 
Wendy Lee, Ching Leung, 
Kathryn Lewis, Betsey 
Livingston, Amanda Loos, 
Vinh Ly, Dianne Lynch, 
Shiara Maher, Jacquelynne 
Maloney, Kaitlyn 
McLaughlin, Ming Lee 
Mui, Jennifer Myers, Pam- 
ela Nevins, Nina Niamkey, 
Caitlin Nichol, Maura 
O'Brien-Ali, Christopher 
O'Connell, Jeffrey 
O'Connell, Carol O'Neill, 
Roy Papkey, Timothy Pez- 
zulo, Kinh Quan, Kelly 
Raymer, Christopher Re- 
gens, Stephen Saluti, Tho- 
mas Slowe, Cherylann 
Smith, Annora Strauchon, 
Katelyn Sullivan, Trang Ta, 
Kimberly Taylor, Howing 
Tracy To, Kenneth Tom, 
Phuc Michael Tran, Annie 
Tse, Katherine Urbati, 
Jenny Wan, Gordon 
Webber, Betty Weng, Cath- 
erine Wong, Vivian Wai 
Yu, Susan Zhen, Shanshan 
Zhou. 

HIGH HONORS 
Grade 9: David Boncek, 
Fen Chen, llham El- 
hamoumi, Diane Gilbody, 
Justin Gray, Jennifer Hall, 
Stephen Hawko, Hayad Is- 
mail, Christopher Jackson, 
Patrick Kelley, Paul 
Krystyniak, Lloyd Mandrell, 
Meghan Oldham, John Sul- 
livan, Jeff Tam, Oanh Tang, 
Qiaoxia Zhang, Ying 
Zheng. 

Grade 10: Celina 
Buczkowski, Michael 



Deery, Uyen Ho, Pamela 
Jacobs, Scott Kelley, Yan 
Lin, Daisy Lo, Jerome 
McBride, Shane Newell, 
Filgen Prifti, Nga Man Tam, 
Noel Vickery, Kelly 
Walker, Michelle Xian. 

Grade 11: Jacquelyn 
Goguen, Cedric King, Kun 
Wai Lam, Nadeam Nahas, 
Daniel Walker. 

Grade 12: Jacqueline 
Chapman, John Cooper, 
Nicholas DiStasi, Ying Ah 
Duong, Sean Fitzpatrick, 
Kimberly Gannon, Kristen 
Lavery, Jill Miller, Christina 
Milone, Russell Mullen, 
James Shea, Courtney 
Tandy, Emily Wallace. 
HONORS 
Grade 9: Juliana Araujo, 
Geizon Demoura, Jason 
Ford, David Gao, Dale 
Hayden, Dorina Kosho, 
Thomas Lynn, Melissa Ma- 
honey, Andre Mai, Stephen 
Malloy, Michael Moody, 
William Moran, Brittany 
Pickering, Erald Sejdini, Joy 
Vignoni. 

Grade 10: Anthony 
Celata, Amy Che, Xing 
Chen, Helen Cheng, Zelinda 
Da Cruz Dos Santos, Wil- 
liam Eisan, Michael Kalell, 
Yong Liu, Jena Maze, 
Douglas Murphy, Cameron 
Payne, Blake Stefanelli, 
Gioi Tang, Edward White. 

Grade 11: Aline Contao, 
Rachel Holt, Maldi Kellici, 
AdrianneNull. 

Grade 12: Joseph 
Brooks, Kaleena Chase, 
Amanda Coleman, Michelle 
CouU, Kristi Coyne, Va- 
nessa Downer, Jilaine 
Foley, Natalie Frustaglia, 
Shamus Hannon, Marie 
Hutchins, Richard Kellam, 
Christelle King, Bridget 
Lanphere, Nichole Leone, 
Melissa Magnoli, Suzanne 
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Interpretative Wayside Dedicated At Abigail Adams Statue 



Representatives from the 
National Park Service, the 
Quincy Partnership, and the 
City of Quincy were on 
hand Friday to officially 
dedicate the Abigail Adams 
Statue Interpretative Way- 
side across the street from 
City Hall. 

The statue itself, featur- 
ing Abigail Adams with her 
hand upon the shoulder of a 
10-year old John Quincy 
Adams, has been at the site 
for two years but now bears 
a colorfiil marker inscribed 
with a passage from one of 
Abigail's letters to her son 
while he was in Europe with 
his father John Adams. 

The passage reads: 
"Improve your understand- 
ing for acquiring usefuU 
(sic) knowledge and virtue, 
such as will render you an 
ornament to society, an 
Honour to your Country, 
and a Blessing to Your par- 
ents ... your ever affection- 
ate Mother, AA." 

Bemice Mader, adminis- 
trative assistant to Mayor 
James Sheets and his repre- 
sentative that day, remarked 
how appropriate it was that 
dedication ceremonies were 
taking place so close to July 
4, given Abigail Adams' 
status in history as on of 
America's first champions 
of the independence of 
women. "She was one of the 
most singularly individual 
thinking women of that time 
period, a period where 
women couldn't own prop- 
erty and were even consid- 
ered property in most of the 
colonies," Mader said. "So 
this is quite timely." 

Marianne Peak, superin- 
tendent of the Adams Na- 
tional Historic Site, said the 
inscription "helps tell the 




BERNICE MADER, administrative assistant to Mayor 
James Sheets, thanks all those who helped make the new 
inscription at the base of the Abigail Adams Statue possible, 
including the National Park Service and the Quincy 
Partnership. Mader said dedication ceremonies so close to 
July 4 were appropriate for one of America's first 
champions of rights for women. 



THE QUINCY PARTNERSHIP includes, from left: Robert Curry, Marianne Peak, Mark 
Bertman, Sandra Williams, James Mullaney, Edward Keohane, Michael McFarland, and 
Thomas Koch. 



story of Abigail Adams and 
her relationship with John 
Quincy Adams" and that its 
message of education and 
national service was as im- 
portant at the turn of the 
millennium as it was at the 
dawn of the 19th century. 
"She always directed her 
children to do the right 
thing," Peak said of Adams. 

Ward 5 Councillor Ste-' 
phen Durkin represented the 
City Council, commending 
the Quincy Partnership on 
their efforts over the past 
two years and calling Abi- 
gail Adams "a very forward 
thinking person." 

Durkin, who pointed out 
that the young John Quincy 
Adams would grow up to be 
not only the sixth president 
of the United States but a 



distinguished congressman 
after his presidency, said the 
new inscription would help 
to ease the confusion among 
tourists who have admired 
the statue but, in some 
cases, have been in the dark 
as to just who the striking 
Hgures are. 

Mark Bertman, owner of 
Rogers Jewelry in Quincy 
Center, spoke on behalf of 
the eight-to-12 member 
Quincy Partnership, thank- 
ing the city, the National 
Park Service, and the hard 
work of his fellow partner- 
ship members. 

Bertman called the 
members of the partnership 
"unnamed, unknown, but 
very active in this city." 

The efforts of Peak and 
the National Park Service 
were lauded by every 



i^..- * 



Abigail Adams 

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THE INTERPRETIVE WAYSIDE beside the AbigaU Adams Statue helps residents and 
tourists aUkc understand Abigail Adams and the relationship she had with son John Quincy 
Adams, who would later emulate his father and become president of the United States. 



speaker at the ceremonies, 
most notably Mader, who 
emphasized just how large a 
contribution the NPS made 
to the culture of Quincy. 
"They really know their 
stuff," said Mader. 



The ceremonies ended 
when children were invited 
to release red, white, and 
blue balloons into the sky as 
a tribute to Adams and her 
son. 

The Abigail Adams 



Statue is located next to the 
United First Parish Church 
(Church of the Presidents), 
where Abigail, husband 
John, son John Quincy, and 
daughter-in-law Louisa 
Catherine are entombed. 




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Page 12 Tlf Qiiincy Sim Thursday, July 6, 2000 



Leaving To Teach At 
University Of Michigan 

Manet Health Honors 

Dr. Karen Musolf 
For 12 Years Service 



The Manet Community 
Health Center, Inc., recently 
recognized Karen Musolf, 
M.D., for her 12 years of 
service to the center at a 
gathering of 70 colleagues, 
patients, and friends at the 
Neighborhood Club. 

Dr. Musolf has accepted 
a teaching position at the 
University of Michigan. 

Dr. Musolf, who re- 
ceived her undergraduate 
and medical degrees from 
the University of Wisconsin 
and completed her family 
practice residency at Duke 
University, came to work as 
a family practice physician 
in Houghs Neck and the 
Snug Harbor Germantown 
sites of Manet Community 
Health Center in 1986. 

Dr. Musolf and her asso- 
ciates care for 2,700 patients 
at Snug Harbor, providing 
6,600 primary care visits 
annually. 

Dr. Musolf was recog- 
nized by Fred Dolgin, M.D., 
medical director of Manet 
CHC. Dr. Dolgin praised 
Dr. Musolf for her "high 
quality of care, comprehen- 
sive knowledge of medicine, 
and dedication to her pa- 
tients." 

Mary Sweeney of 
Quincy Medical Center pre- 
sented Dr. Musolf with the 
Historic Quincy Sites 
Health Education Founda- 
tion Print. Sweeney com- 
mented on the contributions 
Dr. Musolf had made over 
the years to the entire 





KAREN MUSOLF, M.D., (center) says good-bye to associates from Manet's Snug Harbor 
location. Front row, from left, are Jacquelyn Foye, RN, and Beth Archambault, FNP. Back 
row, from left, are Claire Petrie; Ginny Morgan, RN; Hafer; Ellen MacDonald, LAB; and 
Susan Andrea, FNP. 



KAREN MUSOLF, M.D., thanks guests for honoring her at 
a reception held by Manet Community Health Center at the 
Neighborhood Club. After 12 years as a family practice 
physician in Houghs Neck and Germantown, Dr. Musolf has 
left to a teaching position at the University of Michigan. 
Shown with her is Ellen Hafer, executive director of Manet 
CHC. 




Quincy Medical Center 
community and recognized 
her for her dedicated work 
bringing quality care to a 
community-based practice 
in Germantown. 

Barbara Morris, presi- 
dent of the Manet CHC 
board, and Judy Kolson, 
representing patients, spoke 
of the high regard Dr. Mu- 
solf s patients have for her. 

Dr. Musolf has concen- 
trated her practice at the 



Snug Harbor site for the 
past three years. 

In accepting the gifts and 
recognition. Dr. Musolf re- 
marked that her "colleagues 
and patients had become a 
family to her" as she 
brought family practice 
medicine to the community. 
She also said she would 
miss providing care in such 
a close-knit community as 
she moves into a teaching 
role but promised to keep in 
touch with her colleagues 



and patients. 

Dr. Musolf added that 
she was pleased to have had 
some time to work with Dr. 
Meera Mathew, the family 
practice physician who has 
filled her position. 

Dr. Mathew brings nine 
years of experience to her 
new role, having worked in 
community-based practices 
with affiliations at commu- 
nity and teaching hospitals, 
most recently in Baltimore, 
MD. 



6 Quincy Residents On 
U-Mass Dartmouth Dean's List 



MARY SWEENEY of Quincy Medical Center presents Dr. 
Karen Musolf with a Quincy Sites Health Education Print as 
Manet Executive Director Ellen Hafer looks on. 



The University of Mas- 
sachusetts at Dartmouth 
announces that six Quincy 
residents are on the dean's 
list for the Spring 2000 se- 
mester. 

They are: Leah Alves, 
Psychology; Dennis Kohut, 

English/Drama, Film Stud- 
ies; Rebecca Mackey, Soci- 
ology; Amanda McKenna, 
Liberal Arts Undeclared; 



Danielle Robertson, Sociol- Raymond Wong, Computer 
ogy/Social Services; and & Information Systems. 

Siobhaun Maus Graduates 
From Saint Anselm 



Siobhaun P. Maus of 
Quincy earned a bachelor of 
arts degree in Business at 
the recent 107th annual 
commencement exercises at 



Saint Anselm College in 
Manchester, N.H. 

She is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. John C. Maus 
of Piermont St., Quincy. 



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Thursday, July 6, 2000 



P»gel5 



State Street Donates 

$250,000 To Germantown 

"Neighborhood Center 



By CRAIG SALTERS 

"Build it, and they will 
come." 

Ward 1 Councillor and 
Germantown native Gregory 
Hanley echoed this famous 
line from the movie Field of 
Dreams at ceremonies 
Thursday at the Snug Har- 
bor School, trying to ex- 
press just how grateful he 
and his neighbors were for 
State Street Corporation's 
$250,000 gift to build a new 
Germantown Neighborhood 
Center. 

Coupled with a $270,000 
commitment from the city, 
the State Street donation, 
part of its worldwide Mil- 
lennium Gift campaign to- 
taling $1.8 million, makes 
what once was the hope of a 
permanent community cen- 
ter a reality or, as Hanley 
put it, "a dream come true." 

Kathy Quigley, executive 
director of the neighborhood 
center, said planners were 
still exploring locations and 
construction details for the 
project but that it would 
most likely continue to run 
out of the Snug Harbor 
School, only with brand 
new facilities and increased 
services. 

According to State 
Street, the current plan calls 
for a 1,500 square-foot ad- 
dition to be built at the Snug 
Harbor School to create a 
permanent home for the 
center, which provides such 
community services as af- 
ter-school/drop-in services 
for local youths, daycare, 
and adult learning programs. 

Hanley -- speaking 
alongside Mayor James 
Sheets, State Street Chair- 
man Marshall Carter, State 
Street Vice President of 
Community Affairs George 
Bowman, and Ann Marie 
Hanley, president of the 
Germantown Neighborhood 
Council and wife of the 
councillor ~ detailed for the 
crowd his own experiences 
growing up in Germantown 
and how the three institu- 
tions of the Snug Harbor 
School, St. Boniface 
Church, and the German- 
town Service Center pro- 
vided the framework for 



both his family and others 
like it to better themselves 
and grab their share of the 
American Dream. 

Specifically, Hanley 
praised the efforts of his 
mother, who made use of 
education and job opportu- 
nities to eventually graduate 
from Curry College and 
become a paralegal. 

And like his family's 
success story, Hanley told 
State Street's Carter that the 
new neighborhood center 
would become a similar 
"field of dreams," enabling 
future generations to escape 
situations of poverty or 
hopelessness. "And much 
like that movie, little voices 
of the heart have whispered 
to many to bui^ this com- 
munity center," Hanley said. 
"That's why I stand before 
you, Mr. Carter, and those 
from State Street, and say 
thank you." 

Mayor Sheets also 
thanked Carter for the com- 
pany's generous donation 
and reminded the audience 
that "communities are not 
built by bricks and mortar 
and concrete, but by peo- 
ple." 

The new community 
center, said Sheets, would 
become as important to the 
community as the nationally 
recognized Snug Harbor 
school next to it. "We're 
creating a center where peo- 
ple can meet, associate, 
share their burdens, and 
plan," the mayor said. "It 
will strengthen this commu- 
nity." 

Carter, who said State 
Street had worked on a 
smaller scale with the 
neighborhood center in the 
past and realized their im- 
pact in the community, said 
the Millennium Gift was 
part of the company's con- 
tinued commitment to 
Quincy, where it employs 
roughly 12,000 workers, 

and to international efforts 
where the company does 
business. "It's really our 
honor to be here and to help 
the neighborhood center," 
said Carter. 

Carter said the $1.8 mil- 
lion Millennium Gifts, dis- 



tributed to 11 locations 
worldwide, were in addition 
to the company's annual 
charitable donations of 
roughly $8 million annually, 
or one and a half percent of 
State Street's pre-tax profits. 
Of that annual $8 mil- 
lion, Carter emphasized, 
close to 75 percent is tar- 
geted to the Greater Boston 
area. "This is our home," 
Carter said simply. 

State Street, Carter said, 
was founded in 1792 in 
Boston and gave out com- 
memorative donations 
similar to the Millennium 
Gifts in 1992 to celebrate 
the company's 200th anni- 
versary. 

The Snug Harbor cere- 
monies were well attended, 
especially by some of the 
boys and girls fr(Mn the 
center, and there was a 
dance routine performed by 
the Germantown Neighbor- 
hood Center Cheerleaders, 
who are instructed by Erica 
Limoncelli of Squantum. 

The highlight of the 
ceremonies came when a 
front-end loader rode onto 
the grass carrying the over- 
sized check from State 
Street. "I had to catch my 
breath, it was so exciting," 
Mnn Marie Hanley re- 
marked. 

Ralph Yohe, president of 
the South Shore YMCA, 
which has partnered with 
the neighborhood center and 
runs the organizational as- 
pects of the program, called 
the event "a real partner- 
ship" among such groups as 
the YMCA, the center, the 
city, the School Department, 
and private groups such as 
State Street, adding that it 
was just the natural growth 
of already strong relation- 
ships. "The Germantown 
neighborhood is a special 
place, where people are al- 
ways willing to help each 
other out, and we're very 
proud to be involved," Yohe 
said. 

An involvement which 
Hanley was quick to add 
was vital to the neighbor- 
hood. "Without the YMCA, 
there would be no neighbor- 
hood center," said Hanley. 




SPECIAL DELIVERY: State Street Corporation used a front end loader to make its 
$250,000 donation for construction of a new Germantown Neighborhood Center at 
ceremonies held Thursday at the Snug Harbor School. From left are: Ward 1 Councillor 
Gregory Hanley; George Bowman, vice-president of Community Affairs State Street; Anne* 
Marie Hanley, president of the Germantown Neighborhood Council; Mayor James Sheets; 
and Chairman of State Street Marshall Carter. (Bethany Versoy Photos) 




THE GERMANTOWN Neighborhood Cheerleaders performed cheers and dance routines 
Thursday as part of a big neighborhood thank-^ou to State Street Corporation, which is 
donating $250,000 to build a new neighbortiood center as part of its $1.8 million worldwide 
Millennium Gift program. From front row left are: Shari Murray, Heidi Van, Lauren 
Adams, Shannon Carey, and Sarah Constabioe. From back row left are: MicheUe O'Leary 
and Elizabeth Gruchy. 



During his remarks. State 
Street's Bowman discussed 
the 10 other recipients of the 
Millennium Gift, which 
include, among others, 
$300,000 for a demonstra- 
tion food kitchen at Boston 
Medical Center, $250,000 
for a Habitat for Humanity 
project in Kansas City, 
$50,000 to train over 500 
Red Cross workers in Hong 
Kong; and $50,000 to un- 
derwrite Project Orbis' 
three-week mission to pro- 
vide medical training and 
conduct blindness-curing 
operations in China. 

Elizabeth Harrington, 
principal planner for the 
city's Planning Department, 



explained that plans for the 
Germantown Neighborhood 
Center would be 
"integrated" into the $30 
million plus Hope VI Proj- 
ect application, awaiting 
HUD notification in Sep- 
tember. Despite that con- 
nection, Harrington sees no 
problem with the neighbor- 
hood center moving for- 



ward, Hope VI or no. "This 
project has a momentum of 
its own," Harrington said. 

The Germantown section 
of Quincy has the lowest per 
capita income in the city 
and contains 1,000 units of 
public housing. According 
to recent statistics, single 
mothers head 65 percent of 
households. 



Christopher Gorham 
Receives Academic Honors 

Christopher Gorham of P^er Gorham and Stephanie 

Quincy was recently hon- Gorham, was recognized for 

ored for achieving academic achieving honors. Honors is 
honors for the final quarter 

of the year at Belmont Hill 8^^"^^^ ^° s^"'*^"^^ averag- 

SchooL *"S a B in a four or five 

Gorham, son of Christo- '^^^^ program. 





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Page 14 Tl&e QuiiMsy Sun Thursday, July 6, 2000 




Affordable Homebuying Programs Offered By MHFA 



As the homebuying sea- 
son heats up, prospective 
homebuyers in Quincy and 
surrounding communities 
may be able to take advan- 
tage of the affordable home 
purchase programs available 



from the Massachusetts 
Housing Finance Agency 
(MHFA), the 

Common wealth' s affordable 
housing bank. 

That was the message de- 
livered by local and state of- 



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Sandra Fennelly Beverly Joyce Ernie Light 



ficials who gathered recently 
at Quincy City Hall. Mayor 
James Sheets was joined by 
local lenders, homebuyer 
counseling agencies, other 
local officials, and MHFA 
Executive Director Steven 
Pierce to outline MHFA's 
lending programs available 
to help low and moderate in- 
come Quincy residents real- 
ize the American dream of 
homeownership. 

"Quincy has always been 
on the cutting edge in the 
creative use of MHFA fund- 
ing," said Sheets. "I strongly 
urge all those people eager to 
share in the pride of owning 
their own home to learn more 
about all the great MHFA 
programs." 

Sheets emphasized the 
importance of 

homeownership as a way to 
strengthen the city's neigh- 
borhoods. "There is no one 
more energized and commit- 



ted than the first-time 
homebuyer," Sheets said. 

Since it began operations 
in 1970, MHFA has invested 
over $42 million in financ- 
ing for low and moderate in- 
come first-time homebuyers 
in Quincy. The agency has 
also provided over $8 mil- 
lion in funding for 334 units 
of rental housing in 4 multi- 
family housing develop- 
ments located in the city. 

Pierce said it was particu- 
larly important for people to 
be aware of the housing as- 
sistance programs provided 
by the Commonwealth as the 
summer home-buying season 
moves into high gear. "As 
the state's affordable hous- 
ing bank, MHFA has devel- 
oped programs designed to 
meet the needs of young 
working couples, single par- 
ents, and the range of others 
seeking to buy their first 
home," said Pierce. "We es- 





I As a long time resident of Quincy, I om proud to 
announce my affiliation with ERA Central Reol 
Estate. If you have been thinking of buying or 
selling your home, please let me assist you. 

I Spring is finally herel If s time to come out of 
hibernation. Call me now for a free professional 
maricet analysis. 

Bill INiltoii at 617-306-0668, Notary 

ERA CENTRAl REAL ESTAH 

128 Mayor McGrath Highway, 
|-i^ A Quincy, MA 02169 

iLKA 617-328-1312 Fax:617-328-6775 




-CENTURY 21 

ANNEX REALTY, INC. 

49 BEALE STREET, QUINCY, MA 
472-4330 1-800-345-4614 

Across from Blockbuster & Quincy T 




QUINCY 

Feel right at home in this neat two family. Located on well kept 
side street close to shopping and schook, it offers a great 
opportunity for first time landlord. Seeing is believing. $214,900 



Onlug; 



21 



Century 21 sells a house every minute. 

When you're #1 you can do thmgs others can't 

See all our listiiigs at: www.c21aniiex.coiii 



pecially focus on the needs 
of city residents to help them 
get into the homes that will 
assist in building strong, vi- 
tal neighborhoods." 

MHFA's first-time mort- 
gage funds are loaned 
through participating lend- 
ers on a first-come, first-serve 
basis to buyers who have 
signed a Purchase and Sale 
Agreement or an Offer to 
Purchase. Borrowers must 
meet regional income guide- 
lines and properties must 
meet federally established 
price limits. To be approved 
for a three percent 
do wnpayment option, poten- 
tial buyers must complete 
MHFA's Homebuyer Coun- 
seling Program before their 
home purchase. 

While the average 30-year 
conventional mortgage inter- 
est rate has risen to 8.52 per- 
cent — its highest level in 
five years — MHFA is offer- 
ing rates as low as 7.65 per- 
cent for eligible first-time 
homebuyers. A loan of 



PMl - (iONE 



Licensed 

Appraiser will 

remove your 

PML 
Call Art Foley 

at Century 21 
Annex 

472-4330 



$150,000 with a market in- 
terest rate of 8.50 percent 
would cost a homeowner 
$1,153.37 per month. The 
same loan with an MHFA 
rate of 7.99 percent would 
cost the homeowner only 
$1099.60 per month, a sav- 
ings of $53.77 per month. 
Over 30 years, the home- 
owner would save $19,356 
by using MHFA financing. 

MHFA currently offers 
30-year fixed rates of 7.99 
percent with zero points, 7. 80 
percent with one point, and 
7.65 percent with two points. 

Pierce pointed out that 
MHFA programs also reach 
out to those who can afford a 
home mortgage but who have 
not been able to save enough 
money for the up-front costs 
of buying a home. He noted 
there are also programs that 
provide funding assistance to 
current homeowners for im- 
provements and necessary 
repairs and for people in ru- 
ral communities who are 
striving to own a home. 

"MHFA has worked to 
make it easier to coordinate 
with city homeownership 
program efforts," said Pierce. 
"We've simplified and 
streamlined the mortgage 
application process while 
continuing to offer lower in- 
terest rates, three percent 
downpayment options, flex- 
ible underwriting ratios, and 
statewide availability of 
mortgage funds throughout 
the calendar year. All of these 
improvements are designed 
to make it easier for low and 
moderate income peoples to 

(Cont'dOn Page 16) 




When Bmiiii^ or Sclliiii^. Think. 




GUSCONFALONE 
Real Estate Consultant 



Annex Realty, Inc. 

49 Beale St, Quincy, MA 02170 
617-472-4330 ext 310 
Call Gus for a FREE 
Market Evaluation 
of your property 



Centurion 
Broker 



a 



FLAVIN & FLAVIN 
!■ REALTY 

Complete Real Estate Service 
Since 1925 

Committed To Property Ownership 

SALES • RENTALS 

APPRAISALS 

FREE PMI CONSULTATION 

YOU MAY NOT NEED PMI!!! 




vwp 



i««i 



Thursday, July ^2000 



Sun Page 15 



M .if^L 



For All Your Real Estate N^dit 

Our Service is 



Take a Look at These Ail-American Properties,.. 






Washington Street... 2,700+ SF 
office space with 6,800+ SF 
warehouse, 2 overhead doors, 
10,000+ SF lot. For Lease at 
$11 /SR Call Scott Buffington. 



"^ifmiwimmi i..]iiiii.iimiiiii|i|imiiii 

mJf. 



Hancock Street... 5,000+ SF 
office building, great 
visibility, close to shopping 
area, high traffic volume. 
For sale at $399,000. Call Kam Lee. 



Victory Road... New water- 
front construction at Marina 
Bay! 1,150+ SF of Class A office 

space available, great amenities. 

Attractive lease terms. Call Dan Flynn. 




Commercial/Industrial Properties Office Space Available 




— ••'^C- 



QUINCY... New office/retail development, up to 19,000+ subdivtdable SF, great 
visibility and traffic, ample parking. Please call for lease terms. 

HANOVER - 33,833+ SF industrial facility, 2 tail boards, 18 ft. average clear height, 
campus setting, on-site parking. For lease at $2.95/SF. 

WEYMOUTH... High visibility comer on Route 3A, 4 lots totaling 23,979+ SF of 
land, with additional space possible, Neighborhood Center District zoning. Please call 
for sale or lease information. 

JAMAICA PLAIN... Office /warehouse building with 21,536+ SF, 49,429+ SF of 
combined tot size, security fencing, ample parking, Hyde Park Avenue location. 
For lease at $15/SF. 

SOUTH BOSTON... Development opportunity in red-hot South Boston real estate 
market, 2 lots of undeveloped land totaling 3,021+ SF, plus 5,000 SF auto repair 
building on 5,400+ SF lot, 3F 2,000+ zoning. UNDER AQREEMENT! 



WEYMOUTH... New medical office space located directly across from South Shore 
Hospital. Please call for lease terms. 

QUINCY... 2,350+ SF office space and 1,250+ SF warehouse, near highway, parking 
available. For Lease at $12/SF NNN. 

DORCHESTER... New office space with open floor plan, 1,875+ SF per floor (2nd 
& 3rd floor available), great location close to highway. Available Spring 2,000+ 
For lease at $I7/SR 

HANOVER - 9,600+ SF office building featuring outstanding interior finishes and 
treatment... a renovation masterpiece! Glass doors throughout, elegant reception area, 
luxury fixtures, hardwood trim and shelving and more! For sale at $1,150,000. 

HINGHAM... Quality office space in North Hingham featuring 1,243+ square feet of 
space. Ample oti-site parking. For lease at $17/SF, plus utilities. 

NORTH QUINCY... 2,200+ SF of quality office space. On-site parking. 
For lease at $15/SR 

JAMAICA PLAIN... 2 buildings, 1,000+ SF vacant restaurant & 3,000+ SF leased 
office space, 5,600± SF lot, on-site parking, $32,000 income/year. For sale at 
$489,000. 



II I i / ii jjj iiiiiii ii i ii i iii i ii n i |ui ! | iiii , |i| | i _ yiii»pypppw 



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QUINCY CENTER... Quincy Center Storefront! 3,500±SF next to Quincy municipal ROCKLAND.. PrinMsietaUdevelopoMjnt site in growing retaU area, prominent 
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Call 617-479-9000 Today! 

Visit these and other great properties at www.djflynn.com. 




Daniel J« 
Flvnn & Co. Inc. 



^A f. 



COMMERCIAL SALES AND LEASING, 

RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE, 

& REAL ESTATE AUCTIONS 

32 Chestnut Street • Quincy • MA • 02169 

tel 617.479.9000 • fax 617.770.0443 

www.djflyim.com 



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*',4'<-*> — -■«» 



Page 16 T1e» Qulsicy gum Thursday. July 6, 2000 



121 On Sterling Honor Roll 



Sterling Middle School 
ists 121 students on the 
lionor rool for the fourth 
lerm. 

They are: 
HIGH HONORS 

Grade 6: Rachel Pish- 
man, Kimberly Lesslie, 
Candice MacLeod, Khanh- 
Nhat Nguyen, John Or- 
lando, Ashley Quan. 

Grade 7: Kelly Almon- 
acid, Matthew Breslin, 
James Callalian, James 
Contrino, John Folino, 
Kerin Frawley, Kathleen 
Frawley, Kevin Larkin, Ed- 
ward Laura, Nicole 
O'Sullivan, Ramkumar 
Palaniappan, Steven Pris- 
cella, Anthony Iran, Trevor 
Vallone, Katie Walker, Eric 
Wilson. 

Grade 8: Nora DiBona, 
Heather Flanagan, Matthew 
Germain, Christine Gill, 
Antonella Gulla, Daley Hil- 
lier, Jessica Jordan, Sherry 
MacKenzie, Michael Merlis, 
Andrew Patten, Joseph Pris- 
cella. 



HONORS 
Grade 6: Julie Bernstein, 
Gregory Burrows, Melissa 
Chamness, Ian Champion, 
Colleen Corbett, Robert 
Costello, Samuel Crosby, 
Deborah Dunstan, Valentina 
Espinola, Donald Gaxho, 
Jennifer Geraghty, William 
Gilcoine, Phung Ha, 
Stephanie Harvey, Leanna 
Lam, Stephanie Lombardi, 
Ronald MacKenzie, Ryan 
Martinez, Daniel McCarthy, 
Elizabeth McManus, Alex- 
ander Mendez, Briannah 
Newsom, Jonathan Pelletier, 
Jennifer Pimental, Jade 
Pina, Dakota Rose, Melissa 
Sacchetti, Kevin Scanlan, 
Daniel Scribi, Daniel Vil- 
lena. 

Grade 7: Luz Alicea, 
Eric Astrella, Ryan Baker, 
Angel Cooper, Julie 
Deitsch, Michael Dunbar, 
Zachary Eaton, Lisa Fer- 
nandez, Sarah Gardikis, 
Peter Gilcoine, Gary Hillier, 
Paht Juangphanich, Timothy 
Lally, Wendy Leung, 



Samantha Mailles, Ray- 
mond Marchand, Tara 
Marino, Amanda Maze, 
Kevin McPherson Jr., Pat- 
rick Mullen, Daniel Nutley, 
Tanya Pettinelli, Andrea 
Pettinelli, Angela Picone, 
Kaitlyn Pudder, Jean Rich- 
ard, Joseph Salvucci, Steven 
Sullivan, Rachel Sullivan, 
Michelle Thatcher, Jared 
Tusi, Michael Valente, 
Nancy Yee. 

Grade 8: Jennifer Bal- 
dock, John Banks, Nancy 
Bedore, Robert Cavallo, 
Daniel Clark, James Collins, 
Jennifer Correia, Brendan 
Craig, Brendan Crowley, 
Edward DeWitt, Ryan Ger- 
aghty, Bonnie Hirtle, 
Christopher Kirschner, An- 
thony Leung, Ryan Little, 
Scott McConville, Coren 
Monahan, Hoang Nguyen, 
Phuong Nhat Nguyen, Ste- 
phen Ohlson, Ledion Proto, 
Danielle Testa, James Van- 
stavern, Angelo Venturin, 
Maria Villena. 



p{vi Union Congregationd Cfiwcfi 

iMay Tfie Lord'Bkss you & ybuTjamUy 

Vacation Bible School 

July 17-21, 9aiii-noon 




Rev. John Carl Swanson, Pastor 

Comer of Beach Street & Rawson Road, 

Wollaston, MA 02170 • 617-479-6661 




Out program includes traoBpoitatian, the 
■ervices (tf a nnne, a home cooked ?iiiich and 
gnacksprovidedCraftB, exercise, games and 
weekly field trips to make the days fun and 
enjo fable again. 

=> Location: The Salvation Army, 

=» at the corner of Elm & Baxter Si, Qnincy 



FornKife infimnation or to ammge a visi^ 
please can (617) 479-3040 




Adult Day Health Care Program 



Affordable Homebuying 
Programs Offered By MHFA 



(Cont'd From Page 14) 

become homeowners in 
Massachusetts." 

The Fresh giftte Program 
is the agency's newest state- 
wide affordable housing pro- 
gram. It offers up to four per- 
cent of the loan amount for 
downpayment and closing 
cost assistance in the pur- 
chase of a 1-4 family home. 
The program is not restricted 
to first-time homebuyers and 
features 30-year fixed rate 
loans at Federal Housing 
Administration (FHA), Vet- 
erans Administration (VA), 
and Rural Housing Services 
(RHS) maximum mortgage 
limits, and expanded MHFA 
income limits which are (for 
the Boston Market Area) 
$75,000 for a 1-2 person 
household and $86,000 for 
three or more persons. 

To assist people as they 
purchase a home, MHFA's 
Homebuyer Counseling Pro- 
gram offers homebuying help 
and guidance through com- 
munity based organizations. 
These organizations provide 
homebuyer counseling in- 
cluding discussion of the 
mortgage application pro- 
cess; downpayment and clos- 
ing cost requirements; credit 
evaluation; making an offer 
to purchase; home inspec- 
tions; and post-purchase is- 
sues. All borrowers wishing 
to purchase a two, three, or 
four-family residence, and 
those with downpaymentsof 
less thanS percent, must com- 
plete an approved counsel- 
ing class to be eligible for 
MHFA financing. 

Lead paint poisoning is 
one of the greatest hazards 
facingchildren undertheage 



of six, with long-term expo- 
sure often causing permanent 
leamingdisabilities and brain 
damage. Although lead paint 
was banned in 1978, over 
5,300 children have been di- 
agnosed with lead paint poi- 
soning since 1990. It is esti- 
mated that one million homes 
in Massachusetts still con- 
tain lead paint. 

MHFA'sGet the Lead Out 
Program funding is available 
for one, two, three, or four- 
family structures for up to 20 
years, with a minimum of 
five years. 

To qualify for the pro- 
gram, total household income 
may not exceed $46,000 for 
one-to-two-person families 
and $52,000 for households 
of three or more people. 

The Homeowner Septic 
Repair Loan Program offers 
below-market interest rates 
to eligible homeowners, con- 
dominium owners, and con- 
dominium associations with 
failed sewage disposal sys- 
tems statewide under the 
Commonwealth's Title 5 re- 
quirements. 

Homeowner septic repair 
loans are available at interest 
rates of zero percent, three 
percent, and five percent de- 
pending on income guide- 
lines for loans ranging in size 
from $1,000 to a maximum 
of $25,000. Loan terms range 
from three to 20 years and 
must be paid in full upon 
sale, refinancing, or transfer 
of the property. 

The septic repair program 
is the result of the combined 
efforts of the MHFA, the 
Massachusetts Executive 
Office for Administration 
and Finance, and the Massa- 



chusetts Department of En- 
viropmental Protection 
(DEP). There are 34 partici- 
pating lenders in the program. 

To help spur the construc- 
tion of new affordable homes, 
MHFA's Acquisition and 
Development Financing 
Loan Program assists small- 
teale homebuilders that may 
not be able to access conven- 
tional sources of construc- 
tion financing. 

Last year MHFA an- 
nounced the establishment of 
a $1,000,000 fund called 
"The Habitat Project." 
Money from this fund is 
loaned to Habitat for Human- 
ity affiliates throughout the 
Commonwealth to assist 
them with the construction . 
of affordable housing. 

The first loan commitment 
was made to the South Shore 
Habitat for Humanity Chap- 
ter for $200,000. To date. 
Habitat for Humanity Inter- 
national has built 70,000 
houses around the world, pro- 
viding more than 350,000 
people with safe, decent, af- 
fordable shelter. 

MHFA is the leading pro- 
vider of affordable housing 
in Massachusetts. Since 
1 970, the agency has invested 
nearly $6 billion across the 
state helping tens of thou- 
sands of low and moderate 
income people buy their first 
homes, make home improve- 
ments, or rent affordable 
apartments. 

For more information on 
MHFA's homepwnership 
programs, call the Single 
Family Consumer Line at 
(6 1 7) 854- 1 020 or access the 
agency's web site at http:// 
www.mhfa.com. 



Toastmasters Speaker's Bureau 
To Meet Tonight 



A planning meeting of a 
Speaker's Bureau of Toast- 
masters International will 



We need you. 



American Heart 
AssodationJ 







WE'RE FIGHTING FOR YOUR LIFE 



meet tonight (Thursday) at 
7:30 p.m. at Quincy City 
Hall's 2nd floor conference 
room. 

The public is welcome to 
attend. 

The mission of a Toast- 
masters club is to provide an 
environment where mem- 
bers can develop communi- 
cation and leadership skills. 



The mission of a 
Speaker's Bureau within 
Toastmasters is to encour- 
age members to make them- 
selves available as speakers 
to the community. 

Toastmasters Interna- 
tional is a worldwide, non- 
profit organization. 

For more information 
about the meeting, contact 
Steve Rudnick at (617) 773- 
3422. 



ATTENTION 

Quincy Sun Mail Subscribers 

If you are moving, please inform us of your new address at least 
two weeks before. The Post Office will not forward your copy of The 
Sun. 

To prevent delivery of your copy from being interrupted, please fill 
out the form below or notify us by telephone (617) 471-3100. 



PRESENT ADDRESS 



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Street . 
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State 



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Name 

Street 



) 



ZIP Code 



City or Town 
State . 



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Send to The Quincy Sun 

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1 
I 
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I 
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I 
I 
I 



■5«»' 



mmm 



Thursday, July 6, 2000 The QulBLoy Sim Page 17 



Sports 



Morrisette 
Bats Burn Out 



By CHRIS POISSON 

A week ago, the 
Morrisette American Legion 
baseball team showcased its 
holiday fireworks display by 
pounding out a season-high 
20 hits in a 13-1 rout of 
Braintree. 

It has come up with noth- 
ing but duds since. 

Sunday night, Morrisette 
managed only three hits as it 
fell to Weymouth, 3-1, in 10 
innings, wasting a sensational 
pitching performance by 
Keith Doherty. 

The loss was the third 
straight, dropping 

Morrisette' s record to 8-5 
with seven games left in the 
season. After a two-day break 
for the Fourth of July, 
Morrisette played Canton 
yesterday (Wednesday) and 
it takes on rival Quincy to- 
day (Thursday) at 8 p.m. 

Morrisette, even with its 
Red Sox-like offense, hung 
around thanks to the left arm 
of Doherty, who went all 10 
innings, allowing three runs 
on six hits with 16 strikeouts. 

By the 10th, it was clear 
he had no more after he 
walked the first two men, the 
No. 8 and 9 hitters. After 
getting the next batter to 
ground into a fielder' s choice, 
Dan McMann tattooed him 



in relief in the seventh, es- 
caped the jam by getting the 
next batter to bounce into a 
1-2-3 double play on a 3-1 
count. 

Weymouth took a 1 -0 lead 
in the second inning by touch- 
ing up Doherty for a single 
and double with two outs. 

In previous action, 
Morrisette gave up three un- 
earned runs in Saturday's 3- 
2 loss to Milton in extra in- 
nings. Milton scored the 
game-winning run on a 
throwing error in the eighth 
inning. 

Milton went up 2-0 in the 
fifth, scoring both runs on 
wild pitches. Joe Rynn got 
the start and went 5 2/3 in- 
nings, giving up just two hits 
and three walks while strik- 
ing out seven. Rob Celata 
pitched two inning in relief. 

Keith Doherty went 2 for 
2 with two doubles and Brian 
O'Hanley went 2 for 4. 
Bregoli and Chris Doherty 
each had RBI singles. 

Against Braintree Friday, 
Morrisette again squeezed 
out only three hits in a 4-1 
loss. T.J. Bell tossed six in- 
nings, giving up four runs on 
nine hits with seven 
strikeouts. John Gavin col- 
lected two of the three hits 
and Flynn had the other. Chris 



for the game-winner, a two- Doherty drove in the run with 

run double that snapped a 1 - a sacrifice fly in the sixth. 
1 tie. In the 13-1 win over 

Morrisette had its chances Braintree last Thursday, Dan 

to steal a win. In the bottom O'Toole (2 for 3, 5 RBI) 

ofthe seventh, it tied the game belted a grand slam in the 

when the Weymouth right first irming to power the of- 

fielderdropped Pat Bregoli 's fense. Bregoli and Gavin 

(2 for 4) fly ball with one out, each had three hits and two 

allowing Doherty (walk, sto- RBI. O'Hanley stroked a 

len base) to score from sec- two-run double and Adam 

ond. On the ensuing pitch, Goodrich gathered three hits. 
Bregoli, who reached third Matt McCann went the 

on the error, was tagged out distance to pick up the win. 

at home as Morrisette The only run he gave up was 



botched a squeeze attempt. 
The batter then grounded to 
second to send the game into 
extra innings. 

The real heartbreaker 
came in the bottom of the 
ninth when Morrisette loaded 
the bases with one out. But 
Drew Locke, who came on 



a homer to Nick Angelini in 
the second inning. 

Last Wednesday, 

Morrisette put together a 
four-run fifth inning against 
Braintree ace Mike Crane to 
take a 5-2 win. Celata notched 
the victory by giving up one 
run in 5 2/3 innings. 




THE DERBES FAMILY was chosen recently as Alumni 
Family of the Month by the Friends of Quincy High School 
Alunmi Association. From left are: Richard "Hus" Derbes; 
Richard Derbes; Frank Derbes; QHS Principal Robert 



Keuther; Cindy Ohison; "Kim" Derbes; Robert Derbes; Chris 
Barrett, president of the Alumni Association; and Michael 
Derbes. (Presidential Camera Photo/John Black) 



Derbes Family Honored 
By Quincy High School 



T 



he Friends of 
Quincy High 
School Alumni 
Association recently se- 
lected the Derbes family as 
its QHS Alumni Family of 
the Month. 

The family was chosen 
for its longtime community 
involvement and its strong 
connection to Quipcy High 
School: nine family mem- 
bers, including five broth- 
ers, are all QHS graduates. 

The five Derbes broth- 
ers are: Robert Derbes, 
class of 1954; Richard 
"Hus" Derbes, class of 
1956; Toffee Derbes, class 
of 1959; Frank Derbes, 
class of 1960; and Kimal 
Derbes, class of 1 974. 

Founded in 1 957 by the 
family, Derbes Bros., Inc., 
and Derbco Automotive 
started out with one 1938 
one-ton dump truck, one 
1934 Chevy pickup truck. 



one 1/2-ton roller, and hand 
tools. 43 years later, they are 
now the South Shore's larg- years as a backfield coach for 



also Wentworth Institute for 
engineering. He spent two 



est road and paving contrac- 
tor with inventory of $2 mil- 
lion in heavy highway road 
building equipment. 

While at QHS, eldest 
brother Robert participated 
in football and baseball. He 
also attended night classes at 
South Shore School of Re- 
frigeration and Air Condi- 
tioning. After graduation he 
attended Wentworth Institute 
for estimate and plan read- 
ing. He is the treasurer of 
QH/NQH Football Hall of 
Fame and was the 1997 
Quincy Sun Cifizen of the 
Year. 

Richard "Hus" Derbes 
was an all-star in both foot- 
ball and track and was of- 
fered a full football scholar- 
ship to Indiana University. 
However, he chose to attend 
Northeastern University and 



a semi-pro team, the Varsity 
Club. 

Frank Derbes graduated 
from "Quincy Trade" in 1960 
specializing in Automotive 
and Electronic Theory. As 
was Derbes tradition, Frank 
played QHS football. After 
graduation he was drafted 
and served in Vietnam, at- 
tached to the 82nd Airborne. 

Fourteen years later, in 
1974, Kimal Derbes became 
the last of the five brothers 
to graduate from QHS. Once 
again there was a Derbes on 
the QHS football team. In 
fact, Kimal had a 67-yard 
punt against Weymouth and 
was offered a full scholarship 
to West Point as a punter and 
place-kicker. However, he at- 
tended Ferrum in Virginia on 
a football scholarship and 
later attended the Dallas 



Cowboys camp for try- 
outs. He played semi-pro 
for the Plymouth Rocks. 

Other Derbes QHS 
graduates are: Robert 
Derbes, Jr., class of 1977; 
Frank Derbes, Jr., class of 
1986; Michael Derbes, 
class of 1987; and Rich- 
ard Derbes. 

Family accomplish- 
ments include: DARE 
Sponsors; PAL Sponsors; 
Senior Citizens Olympics 
Sponsor; Special Olym- 
pics Sponsor; Archdio- 
ceses of Boston; Rosie's 
Place Sponsor; Pine Street 
Inn Sponsor; USS Salem 
Plank Members; Thomas 
Crane Library Fund; His- 
torical Committee Fund; 
Quincy Youth Hockey 
Sponsor; Quincy First 
Night Sponsor; Ward II 
Civic Association; Boys 
Town Sponsor. 



DPW Fishing Tournament July 15 Benefits Nancy Gorman 



The city's Department of 
Public Works (DPW) will 
hold its fifth annual "Great 
Fishing Fiasco" Saturday, 
July 15, leaving from the 
Quincy Yacht Club. 

A portion of this year's 
proceeds will benefit Quincy 
native and 1981 North 
Quincy High School gradu- 
ate Nancy Gorman, who has 
battled with Quadriplegia CP 
since birth and needs to raise 



funds to pay for her highly 
trained assistance dog Daisy. 

A story on Nancy and 
Daisy appeared in the June 
15th issue of The Quincy 
Sun. 

In the past the fishing 
tournament, which is open to 
all who register, has raised 
between $1000 and $1500 
and donated to such causes 
as the Kevin Moore Schol- 
arship Fund and the battle 



against Lou Gehrig's Dis- 
ease (ALS). 

Tournament start time is 
7 a.m. and finishes with a 2 
p.m. weigh-in to determine 
$250, $150, and $100 prize 



wmners. 



A check presentation to 
Gorman and a cookout for 
all participants and family 
follows immediately after 
the tournament. 

Entry fee is $20 per per- 
son and covers the cost of the 



cookout and a T-shirt. Those 
registering the day of the 
event will not be able to re- 
ceive T-shirts. 

Tournament organizers 
are DPW Water Distribution 
Supervisor Brian Carlisle 



and DPW Timekeeper Tho- 
mas Travis. 

For more information, or 
to register for the tourna- 
ment, call 376-1914 £md ask 
for Thomas Travis or leave a 
message. 



Quit 


WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 

American Heart f^ 
AssodationJ^^ 


Smoking. 



Star baseball camp 

INSTRUaiON & HiniNG CAMPS 

Ages 6, 7, 8 Form League 
Ages 9- 12 Little League 

Age 13 Babe Ruth 

Weelcl: July 10-14 

Week?: July 17-21 

Location: Eastern Nazarene College 
Baseboll Complex - Quinqf 

3 Batting Cages • 2 Baseball Fields 




FOR 



ROUND BALL 
HOOP CANP 

POa BOYS & CIRLS 

INSTRUCTION AND CillNSS 

JULY dl-AUCiUST 4 RMS 6-11 

RUCillST 7-11 RCCS 12-16 

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INFORMATION, CAM PAUL BESTON 471-1846 

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Page 18 Tl&e Qulney Sun Thursday, July 6, 2000 



m 




BILL ALLEN, the overall men's champ. 

(Other photos will appear in July 13th issue.) 



DAWN McCLOUD, the overall women's win- 
ner. (Quincy Sun Photos/Joseph Curran) 



69 Runners Compete 
In Sauantum Road Race 



The annual Squantum 
Road Race was held Sunday 
with 69 runners participat- 
ing in this year's event. 

Bill Allen finished as the 
overall men's winner and 
Dawn McCloud was the 
overall women's winner. J.J. 
Downs took the top spot in 
the boys' division and Kelsey 
Keener finished No. 1 in the 
girls' division. 



Here are the top winners 
for each division: 

1 3 and Under Boys: Dave 
Allen, Jr., Billy Kiley, Shawn 



Don Clancy, Michael 
McDonald. 

Men 35-45: Steve Baeir, 
Bill Kiley, John Green. 



Grogan. Girls: Kayla Mar- Women: Nancy McDonald, 



tin, Christine O'Toole, Al- 
exandria Keener. 

Men 14-25: Matt Moran, 
Gerald Fernandez, Tim 
Mahoney. Women: Sine 
Callanan and Nancy Martin. 

Men 26-34: Jack Burke, 



Annette Roberts, Ann 
Adducci. 

Men 46 and Over: Paul 
Duddy Jr., Jay McRitchie, 
Michael Moran. Women: 
Evelyn Kiley. 



Babe Ruth Baseball 



Golden Print ended its Fire opened the game with ahead by three and third-in 



Granite Ready To Rock 
Eastern Football League 

By CHRIS POISSON 

Last year when the Quincy 
Granite was looking to enter 
into a league, the expansion 
team had its sight set on the 
well-established Eastern 
Football League. 

For co-founders Sean 
Halpin and David Harris, 
landing in one of the nation' s 
top semi-professional foot- 
ball leagues would' ve been 
like eating Oreos instead of 
Hydrox, or drinking Moun- 
tain Dew instead of Moun- 
tain Mania. 

But the EFL's Randolph 
Oilers feared that Quincy' s 
entry would take away some 

of its players and fan sup- strength. league. We have to go out 

port, so they voted against The defensive line, led by and bang with people for the 
Quincy stating it would be ^1 Casey and Jason Vega, entire season. If we do that, I 
violating the league's 25- should pressure the quarter- think we'll be all right. I re- 
mile radius territorial right. back, and Ryan Craig, one of ally do. I have a good feeling 
Well, it took a little longer the league' s top linebackers, about this group." 

will anchor the middle of the There' s one X-factor that 
defense along with Halpin may hurt — the back-to-back 
Offensively, the Granite byes in weeks 5 (Aug. 5) and 
is strong at the skilled posi- 6 (Aug. 12). 
tions but shaky on the offen- "Awful, awful, awful," 
sive line. If the line can hold McPhee said. "We're the 

only team in the league that 
has that." 

Actually, the Hyannis 
Hurricanes also have the mis- 
fortune of a two-week hia- 
tus. When informed of the 
Hurricanes' schedule, 
McPhee said, "It's still aw- 
ful." 

"It hurts you for a couple 
of reasons," he said. "Num- 



Q' 


iiincy Granite Schedule ] 


Sat. 


7/8 


BOSTON COWBOYS 


7:00 


Sat. 


7/15 


@ Hyannis Hurricanes 


4:00 


Sat. 


7/22 


MASS HAVOC 


7:00 


Sun. 


7/30 


@Charlestown Townies 


3:00 


Sat. 


8/5 


BYE (exhibition) 


TBA 


Sat. 


8/12 


BYE 




Sat. 


8/19 


MAINE 


7:00 


Sat. 


8/26 


@New Hampshire 


TBA 


Fri. 


9/1 


©Randolph Oilers 


8:00 


Sat. 


9/9 


©Marlboro Shamrocks 


7:30 


Sat. 


9/16 


MIDDLEBORO COBRAS 


7:00 


Sat. 


9/23 


PROVIDENCE PROWLERS 


7:00 


*Directions to away games will be posted on the team's 




website at www.eteamz.com/granite 













than expected, but after one 
season in the New England 
Football League, Quincy is 
finally a member of the EFL. 
Look out Randolph. 

"The level of play in the 
EFL is head and shoulders 
above the NEFL," said 44- 
year-old place kicker Paul 
Doherty. "The EFL is the 
league we want to be in." 

"It's an upgrade cer- 
tainly," said coach Ken 
McPhee. "Week in, week out, 
it'sgoing to be tough. There's 
much more talent from top to 
bottom. I think the best teams 



up, Quincy should be able 
move the chains and punch 
the ball into the end zone for 
six points. 

"The question mark is the 
offensive line," McPhee said. 
"But we have the ingredients 
so we'll see what happens." 

In the backfield Quincy is 
loaded with bodies. Bernard 
Lynch, Will Felix, Jackson 



, K u .• ^"-"i-'"-— 6— -— a,.cau uy uucc oiiu umu-iu- • ... .^j... ,._ .^wxjEFL) Vetiac, Greg Harty and ber one, your fan base starts 

regular season by beating four runs on singles by An- ning hits by Ed Laura and '" ^^^^ other league (INthL) J to ^et used to not being where 



Quincy Fire, 11-4, in recent thony Boyle, Chris Marinelli 

Babe Ruth action. and Jeff Bossart. Print came 

CatcherJustinThorleyand back on hits by Steve Pizzi 

first baseman Mike and winning pitcher Paul 

McLaughlin each scored McAteertotiethescoreat4. 
three runs. Matt Germain 
smacked two singles and 

scored two runs. and Matt McNeil put Print 




by Tony Centorino, Kevin McGioarty and Bill Staride 

SENSING TROUBLE 

As theirname implies, the sen- culprit, 
sors in today's vehicles function Our ASE Certified service 
as sensing devices that provide technicians at LEO & WALT'S 
the computer with information SUNOCO will do their part in 
such as the chemical content of making sure your car is properly 
exhaust gases and speed rota- maintained for maximum perfor- 
tion, among other data. Thus, mance and efficiency. Here at 
sensors act as input devices for 258 Quincy Ave., E. Braintree 
the computer. The coolant sen- (781-843-1550), we look fon^ard 
sor serves a similar function to to meeting you and to giving your 
the carturetor choke. It enriches car the same level of personal 
the mixture when cold and leans attention we give our own. We are 
the mixture when hot. In the event "A Place Where Your Car Can 
that a coolant sensor goes bad, it Live Longer." We're your local 
can adversely affect the air-fuel source for propane for grills, mo- 
ratio and ignition timing by not tor homes and converted vehicles, 
accurately infomiing the computer HINT: Today's vehicles have 
of the engine operating tempera- computer systems with self-diag- 
ture. When performance prob- nosis capability, meaning that the 
lems crop up, the coolant sensor computer can scan or locate prob- 
is one of the sensors the techni- lems and inform the technician of 
dan will look at as the possible specific malfunctions. 

HoMi Of we AB/CPnoPMe 

(Division of Leo & Walt's Sunoco) 

BOTTLES FILLED BY THE POUND 

No flat rate, you get what you pay fori 



Germain added two more 
runs. 

McAteer gave up only five 
hits and two walks while fan- 
ning seven in the win. Kevin 
Singles in the second in- Holleran played well in left 
ning by Germain, Thorley field for Fire. 

Golden Print — 13 
Quincy Police — 5 
Matt Germain, Ryan 
Feldhoff and Mike 
McLaughlin each had two 
hits and scored three runs. 
Josh Hersey, Steve Pizzi and 
Matt McNeil also had two 
hits each. Germain shined in 
center field and Pizzi was 
solid at shortstop. 

For Police, John Folino hit 
a triple and Frank McKenna 
a double. 
Golden Print — 14 
Barry's Deli — 1 
Stephen Pizzi picked up 
the win, allowing five hits 
while walking two and strik- 
ing out seven. Matt Germain 
went 3 for 3 and scored four 
runs. Mike McLaughlin, Jus- 
tin Thorley, Adam O'Hara 
and Jeff Green all had two 
hits. Josh Hersey stroked a 
single and scored three runs. 
For Barry's Deli, Mookie 
De Angelo had an R 3] double 
that scored Brian Lee for its 
only run. Dean Sandonato, 
Chris Villanueva and Bill 
Cosgrove added singles. 



could compete in this 
league." 

Quincy, one of the top 
teams in the NEFL last sea- 
son, will compete in the EFL. 

It returns most of the players Will Epps splitting the du- 
ties. 

"Do we have a talented 
backfield? Without ques- 
tion," McPhee said. "Prob- 
ably the most talented group 
of kids I have ever had on the 
field." 

Liam Higgins returns as 



from a year ago and has 
sprinkled in some new tal- 
ent. Also, there is no limit on 
the roster size in the EFL so 
the Granite should have more 
depth than last year. 

"The nucleus is the same," 
McPhee said. "We've added 
some skilled kids and some 

young kids. But the nucleus ^^ ^^ ^ome targets to throw 
of the team is back and that's 
important. In this league, 
continuity makes a big dif- 
ference." 

The defense, which al- 
lowed only 10.7 points per 
game last season, will once 
again be asked to lead the 
team. McPhee said his "tal- 
ented" secondary — Louis 



Ogaldez should all see ac- to get used to not being where 
tion. Farouk Brown, a bruis- you want them, and that' s at 
ing 5-foot- 11 -inch, 250- the stadium. Number two, 
pound fullback out of Bos- you have guys in the middle 
ton College, will start with of the season not playing. 

These guys only have so 
many hits in them and you 
don't want them hitting each 
other. I really don't like bye 
weeks." 

Quincy, though, knows 
the schedule is something it 
can't control so it won't pay 
much attention to it, except 



the starting quarterback and for the teams it's playing. 

And some of those teams 

to in wide outs Bill should turn into potential ri- 

MacDougall, Charlie vals. 

McCall, Matt Fratarillo, "Our rivalries should be 

Epps, Parks and tight end Jeff Randolph, Charlestown and 

Powers. If Higgins is unable the Boston Cowboys," 

to play for some reason, McPhee said. "Randolph has 

Quincy has a capable backup to be. They're going to bring 

in JR Rendle who played well their fans and we' re going to 

in a couple of starts last year, bring our fans. 1 think it will 




■1 iu. i- *-L im .L 



Leo & Watt's Sunoco 
843-1SN 






1 i. i J 



"We want to do well in 
Boullard, Felipe Ogaldez, *is league," said McPhee 
Derrick Epps. John about his team's goals. "We 
Skiebekis, Troy Parks, John want to be representative of a 
Murphy will be the semi-pro football team in this 



beagoodrivalry.Ican'twait" 
Friday, Sept. 9 at 8 p.m. 
has been circled on the cal- 
endar — look out Randolph. 



Steve Sullivan Grand Slam 
Powers Nationals, Wins MVP 



Steve Sullivan crushed a 
mammoth grand slam to 
power the National League 
over the American League in 
the recent Junior League All- 




TfT 



American Heart 
AssodatyMiJ 

r ' fff rr s "g - ' t 



« 



Star game at a packed McCoy 
Field. 

Sullivan's heroics earned 
him the MVP award for the 
National League. Ray 
Marchand pitched two score- 
less innings to picked up the 
win. 

Drew Loud's defensive 
skills earned him MVP hon- 



ors for the American League. 
He also belted two doubles 
and scored two runs. Zack 
Eaton pitched the final in- 
ning without allowing a hit. 
In the Home Run Derby, 
Eaton hit six round trippers 
tocapture the crown. Sullivan 
finished second and Loud 
was a finalist. 



^^" 



Thursday, July 6, 2000 Tbe Quiioicy Sun Page 19 



Old Timers Recall 
Sox' 1918 Champs, 

Babe Ruth And 
Local Big Leaguers 

From John Rudderham to Dick Donovan 



By TOM HENSHAW 

The recent "baseball night" 
at the Quincy Historical So- 
ciety stirred memories for 
Ed Spargo, one of the few fans who 
can remember 1918, the year the 
Sox last won the World Series, and 
John Noonan, who saw his first Sox 
game in 1927. 

Spargo, 92, was 10 years old 
when the Red Sox beat the Chicago 
Cubs, four games to two, for the 
title in that war-shortened season, 
and Noonan. who just turned 80, is 
the longtime director of the Quincy 
Council on Aging. 

The baseball night at the Adams 
Academy headquarters of the His- 
torical Society featured a talk by 
Lee Springer, co-author of the book 
"The Year the Red Sox Won the 
Pennant." 

As an added attraction. Society 
Director Ed Fitzgerald conducted 
a contest to see who could "name 
as many major leaguers as you can 
who had any sort of a Quincy con- 
nection." 

Spargo won, barely edging out 
Noonan. 

Included in Spargo's list were 
Quincy natives like Dick Donovan, 
who pitched 15 years in The Show, 
Quincy residents like Derek Lowe, 
who hurls currently for the Red 
Sox, and big leaguers who played 
in Quincy in the twilight of their 
careers. 

Quincy natives: 

• Dick Donovan, who pitched 
and won two World Series games 
for the Chicago White Sox against 
the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1959 
and won 122 games in all. 

"I had the honor of interview- 
ing Dick Donovan on Quincy 
Cable TV about his career," said 
Noonan. "He hit 1 5 home runs dur- 
ing his career, which was pretty 
good for a pitcher in those days." 

• Ted Olson, who played three 
years in the late '30s for the Red 
Sox, winning one and losing one 
of a total of 18 games. 

• Bill Ferrazzi (not the former 
police chief), who got into three 
games for the Philadelphia Athlet- 
ics, forerunner of the Oakland A's, 



in 1935 with a 1-2 record. 

• Pete Varney, who caught 69 
games for the White Sox and At- 
lanta Braves from 1973 to 1976 
with a batting average oif .247. 

• Foster Pine (call me "Babe") 
Ganzel, who hit .3 1 1 for the Wash- 
ington Senators while patrolling the 
outfield in 1927-28. 

• John Rudderham, who 
roamed the outfield for the Boston 
team in the Union Association for 
one game in 1 884. Only Ed Spargo 
would recall the major league 
Union Association, let alone 
Ruddeiiiam. 

Quincy residents, in addition to 
Derek Lowe: 

• Bill Vargus, who pitched 15 
games for the Boston Braves (re- 
member them?) in 1926-27. 

• Steve White, who pitched 6 
2/3 innings in four games for the 
Siinators and Braves in 1912. 

• Sam Mele, the Sox right 
fielder alongside Ted Williams and 
Dom DiMaggio, and later managed 
the Minnesota Twins to the Ameri- 
can League pennant. 

• Charlie Ganzel, Babe's father, 
who caught for Boston's National 
League team during a 14-year ca- 
reer that began with St. Paul of the 
Union Association. 

• Tim Naehring, the recent Red 
Sox infielder whose promising ca- 
reer was cut short by injury. 

Big leaguers who played in 
Quincy: 

• Jim Lonborg, the Red Sox 
pitcher in the 1967 season whose 
career was hobbled by a skiing in- 
jury. He later became a Scituate 
dentist and played against many 
South Shore teams at Adams Field. 

• Blondie Ryan, who graduated 
from Holy Cross and played third 
base for the Fore River team in the 
New England League in the '30s 
before joining the New York Giants 
and Yankees as well as the White 
Sox and the Philadelphia Phillies. 

"If you count the major leagu- 
ers who worked at the Fore River 
shipyard and played baseball for 
the Fore River team," added 
Noonan, "Shanty Hogan, Rabbit 
Maranville, Deacon Danny 




RED SOX stars of the past get together in Quincy's Neighborhood Club a dozen years ago to honor Sam Mele, a 
longtime Quincy resident. Left to right: Ted Williams, Mele, Bobby Doerr, Dick Donovan, Eddie Pellegrini, Ted 
Lepcio, Eddie Yost, Marty Barrett, Johnny Pesky and Frank Malzone. All but Donovan, a Quincy native who 
pitched for the Chicago White Sox in the 1959 World Series, played for the Red Sox. 

(Quincy Sun file photo by Robert Bosworth) 

MacFayden and Hank Gowdy of game must be completed by 5 p.m.. aggregation under Manager Ed 

the Braves would be included as I had the thrill of seeing Babe Ruth Barrow, a crew of banjo hitters with 

local ties during the first Weorld in two games on one day for 50 only Babe Ruth batting .300. But 

War." cents. I later saw Ruth in 1935 superior pitching and airtight field- 

Noonan also recalled Elbie when he finished his career with the ing carried them to the series where 

Fletcher, the old Braves and Pitts- Braves. pitchers Ruth and Carl Mays scin- 

burgh Pirates first baseman, who "I also remember attending a tillated with two victories each and 

played many games in Quincy game between the famous House ERAs of 1.00 for Mays and 1.06 

while growing up in his native of David and Colored Giants teams for the Babe. 

Milton. at upper Merrymount Park way "In sharp contrast to today when 

Some othei'major leaguers who back years ago." a club usually uses three pitchers 



Builders Licensing Summer Course 



undoubtedly played games in 
Quincy included: 

• Dan Howley, the light hitting 
(. 1 25) East Weymouth catcher who 
played for the Phillies and later 
managed the Cincinnati Reds for 
six years in 1927-32. 

• Ezra Sutton of Braintree, 
whose career spanned the five years 

• of the National Association (1871- 
75). He had a career average of 
.327 for Cleveland and Philadel- 
phia teams. 

• Jack Manning of Braintree, 
who played for Boston, Baltimore 
and Hartford in the National Asso- 
ciation. He hit .282 as an infielder- 
outfielder and had a 17-17 record 
as a pitcher. 

• Jack Cameron, Canadian- 
bom but a resident of Braintree. 
who started the 1906 season with a 
Braintree semi-pro team and 
wound up that September playing 
the outfield for the Boston Nation- 
als. 

Noonan recalled his first en- 
counter with big league baseball. 

"My father took me to my first 
major league baseball game in 1 927 
to see the Red Sox versus the New 
York Yankees at Fenway Park in a 
doubleheader on a Sunday after- 
noon," he said. 

"There were no lights then and 
the Sunday Blue Laws stated that 



Noonan and Spargo had some per game, every Sox starter in the 



good-natured fun involving the Sox 
famed Ted Williams. 

"I saw Ted Williuams hit his last 
home run at Fenway Park," recalled 
Noonan. 



series went the distance, except for 
one game when Joe Bush relieved 
winning pitcher Ruth in the ninth 
inning. 

""The bombshell that ended the 



"My late wife and son Billy also Sox dynasty and started a most re- 
saw that Ted Will iams homer with markable Yankee domination came 
about three million others who after the scandal-scarred 1919 sea- 
claim they were at Fenway that son when owner Harry Frazee ru- 
day," said Spargo. ined a championship club by sell- 

"I recall the crowd of 1 0,000 ing first Babe Ruth and Carl Mays,. 

gave Ted a standing O for 10 min- and later pitchers Waite Hoyt, Joe 

utes but he refused to tip his cap. Bush, Herb Pennock, Sad Sam 



Today he regrets that he didn't." 

Spargo had "a flood of bitter- 
sweet memories of our beloved and 
frustrating Red Sox" in that Series- 
winning season 82 years ago. 

"Euphoria over the Red Sox tri- 
umph was dampened by the loss of 
thousands of American boys who 
sacrificed their lives 'to make the 
world safe for democracy' and 
countless millions of lives lost in 
the worst influenza epidemic in his- 
tory," he said. 

"The war-shortened season of 
1918 was also marked by a play- 
ers' strike for more money. You will 
find it incredible that the victori- 
ous Sox players received a paltry 
$890 and each member of the Cubs 
$535 as their shares of the series 
receipts — after deductions for war 
charities. 



Jones and George Pipgras and 
catcher Wally Schang to the 'damn 
Yankees.' 

"Sad to relate, the 1918 cham- 
pionship ended the glory days for 
our Sox, who had qualified for five 
World Series and, believe it or not, 
had won all five. 

"A World Series championship 
was registered in 1903, when they 
were called the Boston Pilgrims, 
until club owner John 1. Taylor of 
the Boston Globe's Taylor family, 
changed the name to the Red Sox 
the following year. 

"The Sox then rattled off four 
pennants in seven years (1912, 
1915, 1916 and 1918) and tri- 
umphed in all four World Series. 

"And 82 years later, we're still 
yearning for another world's cham- 



"The 1918 Sox were a strange pionship flag." 



The Builders Association of 
Greater Boston announces the next 
Builders Licensing Course will be- 
gin Monday, July 10 at its Quincy 
location, 700 Congress St. 

Classes held each evening from 
7 to 10 p.m. and continue for seven 
weeks with a mock exam given 
during the last class. Certificates 
issued upon completion of course. 

The next state exam is Sept. 9. 
Deadline to register for the exam 
is Aug. 11. Contact the Board of 
Building Regulations & Standards 
at (617) 727-7535 for license eli- 
gibility requirements. 

BAGB has been reconmiended 



by many building inspectors and 
other professionals as a source of 
review of the Massachusetts State 
Building Code Book and prepara- 
tion for the MA Construction Su- 
pervisors Licensing Exam. This 
course is a review of the sixth edi- 
tion code. 

The course is approved for five 
continuing education credits for 
Massachusetts building officials. 

Interested builders and 
remodelors can call (617) 773-6004 
or (617) 773-1300 for more infor- 
mation on registration and dates of 
weekly classes. , , 



■ ■ ■ ■ ■ I SUBSCRIPTION FORM ■■■■■■ 

FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 



1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 
CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 
[ ] 1 YEAR IN QUINCY $16.00 

[ ]1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY $18.00 [ ] CHECK ENCLOSED 
[ ] 1 YEAR OUT OF STATE $22.00 [ ] PLEASE BILL ME 



___-#^U^ 



r 



Page 20 



Thursday, July 6, 2000 



Dr. Christine Hulwr 
Chiropractor 

You've heard how good Chiropractic care is for you. 
Discover for yourself just how good you can feel. 

1250 Hancock Street, Quincy 

at Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates 
(617) 774-0595 or (617) 774-0611 

Provider for: Harvard Pilgrim, T\ifts, Blue 

Cross, Neighborhood Health, Medicare, 

Mass Health, Motor Vehicle, 

Worker's Compensation and others. 




Summer's Here: Better Safe Than Sorry 



By JOANNE GOLBURGH, 
NP 

The smiles on the faces of 
your children can only mean one 
thing: school's out for summer. 
Kids have more free time on 
their hands to play outside in 
pools, parks, fields and streets. 
Exercising certain precautions 
will help keep your kids safe 
and healthy. 

Below I speak of some corn- 



Children 

Teens 



ROBERT AZRAK, Ed.D. 

Licensed Psychologist 
Mass Bay Counseling, 36 Weston Ave., Quincy 

(617) 786-0137 

www.psyrca.com 



Adults 
Families 



mon culprits for summer injury 
or illness and how to combat 
them: 

Sun 

The American Academy of 
Pediatrics (AAP) and most der- 
matologists reconimend the lib- 
eral use of sunscreen containing 
a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) 
of 30. There is no benefit of 
using an SPF higher than 30. 
Sunscreens are safe for use over 
the age of 6 months, and can be 
used minimally in small areas of 
the body for infants under 6 
months old. 

Sunscreen should be applied 
a half hour before exposure to 
the sun so it can be absorbed by 
the skin. It should also be re- 
applied after swimming (even if 
the sunscreen claims its water- 
prooO, and sweating. Don't for- 



get to use sunscreen on hazy as 
well as sunny days, as the sun's 
ultraviolet rays are powerful. 
The use of sunglasses and hats 
are also recommended. 
Bicycles, In-line Skates 
Riding a bike or using in- 
line skates are both extremely 
popular among children, and 
even more so during the sum- 
mer. The same precaution ap- 
plies to both: wear a helmet. 
Some statistics indicate that 50 
percent or more of all bicycle 
riders, especially the 10-16 age 
group, don't regularly use a hel- 
met, and that's asking for 
trouble. 

Most of my patients under 
the age of 12 usually wear a 
helmet while bicycling but once 
they reach middle school age 
and beyond they say peer pres- 



COMPLETE FAMIIY HEALTH CARE SERVICES 

• Treatment of Colds, Flus, etc 

• Annual Physical Examinations 

• Minor Bmergemy Care 
' Immunization/Pre-Marital Testing 

• Preventive Health Screening 

• Occupational Health Services 



South Shore Health Center ij>c(iu;n> 

759Granit8St.,Braintree,MA02184 Cnutin-PUud 

(781)848-1950 i<> iluM.nniinn^<^ 

DAVID S. EGILMAN, MD, MPH, MEDICAL DIRECTOR 




Chiropractic 
Update 

by 

AAark C. Jaehnig D.C. 



Manet 
Community 
Health Center, Inc 




Est.1979 



Providing Family Practice 
primary health care for all ages 
for the insured and the uninsured 

Medical, Lab. Nutrition, Smoking and HIV Services 

Accredited by At 

• Houghs Neck 

Snug Harbor 
North Quincy 
JoM Commlstioii Hull Medical 

on AccmtlMon ol Healthcan Organizatiotts 



WHAT IS A SLIPPED DISC? 

The term "slipped disc" has been used commonly, by doctors 
and patients alike, to generally describe an injury to one of the 23 
"jelly-like" shock absorbers found between each of the bones or 
vertebrae of the spine. These intervertebral discs are ligaments 
wfiich actually consist of a "jelly-like" middle surrounded by rings of 
cartilage. While these discs do not actually "slip" from between the 
spinal bones, they can be worn, compressed, bulged, or ruptured 
causing pressure on the adjacent spinal nerves. It is this bulged or 
ruptured disc that pressures or "pinches" the nerve which actually 
causes the severe back and/or leg pain that may result. Often 
times, muscle spasms will accompany a disc injury as the body 
attempts to stabilize or splint the damaged lower back or neck. 

While the intervertebral discs may lose some of their height and 
resiliency and dry out slightly over the years, the final straw of a disc 
injury may be a sudden twist or slip, an improper lift, or a seemingly 
minor accident. 

Chiropractors are well qualified in the prevention and/or treat- 
ment of disc injuries and often employ the modern technology of 
MRI or Catscan to ensure accurate diagnosis. Chiropractors use 
a drugless, non-surgical approach which may include manipula- 
tion, forms of therapy, proper exercise and bed rest. 

If you have any questions or would like to make an appointment 
please call Dr. Mark Jaehnig, a lifelong Quincy resident, at Quincy 
Chiropractic Office, 110 Billings Road, N. Quincy, 773-4400. 



sure is the reason they no longer 
wear one. 

I also recommend the use of 
elbow pads, knee pads and wrist 
guards, as wrist fractures are the 
most common injury suffered 
by skaters. 

Heat 

Even with young children 
and infants, increasing fluid in- 
take, particularly water, is the 
best medicine against the heat. 
Stay indoors during the sun's 
peak hours of 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., 
especially on hot and humid 
days. 

Insects 

In general, use of repellents, 
such as Skintastic and Skeedadle 
that contain Deet concentration 
of less than 10%, are safe and 
effective for children against 
black flies and mosquitos. They 
can also repel deer ticks that can 
cause Lyme disease. Ticks are 
usually found in tall, grassy ar- 
eas and the woods, and it's best 
to wear long pants tucked into 
socks, a long-sleeved shirt, shoes 
and a hat when in known tick- 
infested areas. 

Insects like bees, hornets and 
wasps sting; the best way to 
treat the bite is to apply ice im- 
mediately on the affected area 
and to administer a dose of oral 
Benadryl. If the swelling from 
the sting begins to spread and 
hives or respiratory distress de- 
velop, you should call 911 or 
visit the Emergency Room im- 
mediately. 

Pools, Swimming Spots 

Most water accidents occur 
in pools. Extreme caution needs 
to be taken to ensure that a young 
child does not have access to a 
pool. Children should not be left 
unattended in a pool area. The 
AAP suggests that swimming 
lessons before ihe age of 4 may 
give a child a false sense of 
security regarding his ability to 
swim. It is, however, recom- 
mended that older children learn 
to swim. 



Smoking. 



American Heart 
AssodationJ 

WE'RE FIGHTING FOR YOUR LIFE 







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O C I A T E S 




400 Washington Street, Suite 301 

Braintree, MA02184 

781-356-4544 

specializing in 

childrea adolescents 

and 

persons with 

special needs 



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Hearing aid 




Stephen P. Tobias 

Board Certified Hearing 

Instmment Specialist 



"Tips from Tobias" 

will a hearing aid 
correct my loss right 
away? 

Not You will notice an 
immediate difference in 
volume and some sounds will 
be clearer but it takes time to 
re-leam how to hear with a 
hearing aid. Your maximum 
potential may not be reached 
for a ful' year. Hearing is a learned process, the brain 
needs to store infonnation received from the ear . When 
you first get a hearing aid, it is foreign to the brain. The 
brain wants to hear and will learn to the best of its 
ability, if you give it enough practice. Try to be patient, 
practice , and keep in touch with your Hearing 
Instrument Specialist for adjustments and fine tuning. 
Don't wait too k)ng to get help. The longer you wait, the 
more difficult it is for the brain to re-leam how to hear 
again. This is a major reason why a hearing aid C€ui end 
up in a desk drawer instead of an ear. There are other 
reasons, most of whk:h can be overcome If your 
Specialist is dedicated to your successi If you carefully 
select ycMjr Specialist, he or she will carefully select 
your hearing instrument. 

Now yoc/ go and spread the newsl -Steve 

Stephen Tobias Hearing Center 

488 Quincy Ave, Quincy, MA 02169 (next U) shipyard) 

Have any toptes for upcoming 

Tiper? Write or call 617 770-3395 



Miill 



Thursday, July 6, 2000 Tbe Qulntsy Suit Page 21 







leicN 



Rev. Frederick Barr New 
Star Of Sea Parish Pastor 



United Methodist 



A new pastor, the Rev. 
Frederick L. Barr. will take 
over the Star of the Sea Par- 
ish in Squantum on July 10. 

He will replace the Rev. 
Charles R. McGahey, the 



pastor for three years, who 
resigned June 10 for reasons 
of health. 

Father Barr has been tem- 
porary parochial vicar at St. 
Patrick Parish in Natick. 



Bethany Congregational 



Bethany Congregational 
Church, Spear and 
Coddington Sts., will have 
morning worship services 
Sunday at 8:30 and 10 a.m. 

The 8:30a.m. service will 
take place in the Bethany 
Chapel on Spear St. 

Rev. William C. Harding 
will conduct both services. 



At the 10 a.m. service the 
scripture reader will be Jean 
ross. Music for this service 
will feature The Friends of 
Bethany singers with Tom 
Boyer, organist. 

Greeters will be Russell 
and Olive Hodgkins. 
Childcare will be available 
for infants and toddlers. 



Houghs Neck Congregational 



Dr. Peter V. Corea will 
preach the sermon "Life's 
True Rewards" at the 9:30 
a.m. worship service Sunday 
at Houghs Neck Congrega- 
tional Church, 310 Manet 
Ave. 

The service will be con- 
ducted by Rev. M. Alicia 



Corea. 

Music by organist Arden 
Schofield. 

Deaconess Joyce Bishop 
and Junior Deacon Mark Paul 
will serve. 

Coffee hour will follow 
the service. 

All are welcome. 



Vacation Bible School 
At Union Congregational 



Union Congregational 
Church, 136 Rawson Rd., 
Wollaston, will sponsor a 
"Very Exciting Bible 
SchooF"" program for the 
kids of Quincy. 

Outback Games™ is the 
Vacation Bible School pro- 



gram being hosted by Union 
Congregational July 17-21 
from 9 a.m. to noon. 

Outback Games^"^ is an 
interactive learning experi- 
ence for kids ages 3-12. For 
more information, call Union 
Church at 479-6661. 



Free Tree-Identification 
Guide Book Available 



"What Tree Is That?", a 
pocket guide for identifying 
trees, is available free-of- 
charge from The National 
Arbor Day Foundation. 

The 72-page guide will 
help you identify 135 differ- 
ent trees found in the eastern 
and central U.S. 

Well-known trees are in- 
cluded: oaks, maples, 
spruces, and pines. Also spe- 
cies such as horsechestnut 
and mockemut hickory, sas- 
safras and shadbush, persim- 
mon and pawpaw and 
pagodatree and pecan. 

Dozens of drawings illus- 
trate the trees' leaves or 
needles and acorns, berries, 
seed pods, cones, etc. "What 



Tree Is That?" is organized 
to make it easy to identify 
trees in a simple step-by-step 
fashion. 

"Helping people enjoy 
and appreciate trees is cen- 
tral to die educational mis- 
sion of the Arbor Day Foun- 
dation," said John Rosenow, 
the Foundation's president. 
"Being able to identify trees 
is important to knowing how 
to care for them and how to 
plant the right tree in the right 
place." 

To obtain your free tree 
ID guide, send your name 
and address to "What Tree Is 
That?", The National Arbor 
Day Foundation, Nebraska 
City, NE 68410. 



Adult Immunization Topic July 11 



Ruth Jones, R.N., health 
educator from the Quincy 
Health Department, will give 
a presentation on Adult Im- 
munization Tuesday, July 1 1 



at 10 a.m. at Quincy Medical 
Center, 114 Whitwell St., 
conference room D. 

Refreshments will be 
served. 




WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



American Heart 
AssociationJ 



« 



Elizabeth Bucella will be 
the guest speaker at the 10 
a.m. worship service at 
Quincy Community United 
Methodist Church, 40 Beale 
St., Wollaston. 

Her sermon topic will be 
"Do What You Have the 
Power to Do." 

Music will be by the 
women's chorus, accompa- 



nied by Marlene Briggette at 
the piano and Drucilla 
Madigan at the organ. Cathy 
Emerson will be the lector. 
Shiriey Foore will be the 
greeter. John O'Connor and 
William Morrissey will serve 
as ushers. The coffee hour 
will be hosted by Joanne 
Nolan, Dorothy Noguiera, 
and Bonnie Mann. 



Ice Cream Smorgasbord 
At Covenant Church 



Quincy Covenant Church, 
315 Whitwell St., will hold 
an Ice Cream Smorgasbord 
Sunday, July 9 at 3 p.m. 

For $4, those attending 
can have all the ice cream 
they can eat. 

The event will help raise 
funds to send youngsters to 



summer camp. 

For more information or 
directions, call 479-5728. 



WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



American Heart 
AssociationJ 







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Sl-RVICES & ACTIVITIES 




158V\tishington ^tTQuincy 

phone: 773-9797 

Rev. Gregory E. Wheaton, PsiStor 

New Summer Schedule 

Morning Worship 

8:30 & 10:30 AM 

4Youth & Children's Ministry 

A*Contemporary Worship 

■■ •Man'iage & Family Group 

■I •International Fellowship 

^ ^, •DivorceCare 






Our Lady Of Good 
Counsel Parish 

227 Sea St., Quincy 
(617)472-1408 

MASSES 

Saturday 4:30 p.m. 

Sunday 

9AM& 11AM 

Daily Mass 9 AM 



Church Of St John 
The Baptist 

44 School St., Quincy 
773-1021 

MASS SCHEDULE: 

Daily 8:00 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 

Saturday 4 p.m. 

Sunday 7, 9 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 

1 1 a.m.-Family Liturgy 

Confessions In Chapel 

Saturday 3-3:45 p. m. 

Rectory: 21 Gay St. 

Handicapped Accessib/e 

St. Joseph's Church 

550 Washington Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

617-472-6321 

SUNDAY MASSES: 

4 p.m. (On Saturday) 

8:30, 10, 1 1 :30 a.m. & 5 pm 

Weekday Masses 9am 

CONFESSIONS: Saturday, 3:15-3:45 pm 

Handicapped accessible & 

Handicapped parking, side entrance 

air conditioned 



Sacred Heart Church 

'A Roman Catholic Community walldng together 

in Faith, Worship, Education and Sen^icx' 

386 Hancock St., 

North Quincy, MA 02171 

(617) 328-8666 

Sunday Masses 

- 4pm (Sat.) 7:45am, 9am (Family Liturgy) 

10:30am (with Choir) 12 noon and 5pm 

Weel(day Masses 

Mon.-Fri 7am and 9am, Sat. Sam 

Han<£capped Accessible 

Confessions 

Sat. 3-3:45pm in Saint Joseph Oratory 






SSSSISW^K 



STAR OF THE SEA CHURCH 
Squantum, MA 328-0866 

Sunday Mass (4:00PM Saturday) 

8:30 & 10AM Sunday 

Daily Mass 9:00AM 

Confessions 3:00-3:45PM (sat) 

Baptisms every Sunday at 1 1am 



Saint Ann 's Church 

757 Hancock Street Wollaston • 479-5400 

Pastor: Rev. Monsignor Robert P. Deeley 

Weekend Mass Schedule: Sat 4:00 & 7:00 PM, 

Sunday 7:00, 8:45, 11 :00AM 

Daily Masses: 9:00 AM 

Handicapped Chairlift Available 



St Mary's Church 

95 Crescent St., Quincy • 773-0120 

Masses 

Saturday, 4pm, Sunday 7, 9:30 

& 1 1:30am, Weel<days 9am 

Handicapped Accessible 

New Members Welcome! 




HOUGHS NECK . 
CONGREGATIONAL 
CHURCH 

310 Manet Ave., Quincy 

Sunday Service Of Worship 

9:30 AM Summer Schedule 

life's True Rewards' 

Dr. Peter V. Corea Preaching 

Wheelchair accessible 

Air conditioned 

Use And Obseive 

The Sabbath. 

Keep It Holy. 

Or Lose It! 



Epi$co|>al 



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QUINCY POINT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

444 Washington Street • 773-6424 
10AM Worship Service 

Rev. Leighton Foss, 
Interim Pastor Preaching 



UNION CONGREGATIONAL 
CHURCH 

Beach St & Rawson Rd,Woilaston 
479-6661 



BETHANY CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

Corner of Spear & Coddington Sts., 

Quincy Center •479-7300 

8:30 a.m. Chapel Service 

10 a.m. Sunday Worship 

Rev. William Harding Preaching 

Summer Church School 

CtjildcareAmiatilB. 



St. Chrysostom*s 
Episcopal Church 

Corner of Hancock & Linden Sts. 

Wollaston • (617) 472-0737 
Sunday 8 & 10am 
Holy Eucharist 
Sunday School 
& Nursery at 10am 

Thrift Shop open 
Wed-Fri I0am-4pm 
Everybody Welcome 



The Lord's Planting 

Quincy Foursquare Church 

Corner of Newbury Ave. & 

Sagamore St., N. Quincy 

847-4444 

Sunday Services 9:30 & 1 1am 







^ 



QUINCY COMMUNITY 
UNITED METHODIST 
CHURCH 

40 Beale St., Wollaston • 773-3319 

10 AM Sunday Worship 
Elizabeth Bucella - Guest Speaker 
'Do What You Have the Power to Do' 




Wollaston 
Church Of The Nazarene 

37 East Elm Ave., Wollaston, 472-5669 

Interim pastor Neale McLain 

Rev. Samuel Chung: Pastor 

Quincy Chinese Church of the Nazarene 

Sunday Services, 8:30am Holy Communion 

9:30am Cantonese Worship (Shader Hall) 

9:45am Christian Education (all ages) 

1 1 am Morning Worship Celebration 

* Nursery Care and Children's Churdi through grade 4 

6pm Evening Sewice (contemporary) 

The Wollaston Church of the Nazarene is 

air corxHtiaKd and wheelchair accessible. 

Ml ARE WELCOME 




THE SALVATION ARMY 

6 Baxter St., Quincy • 472-2345 

9:45 SUNDAY SCHOOL 

11AM WORSHIP SERVICE 

6PM PRAISE SERVICE 

7PM TUES WOMEN'S FELLOWSHIP 

7:15PM WED. BIBL^ STUDY 








First Spiritualist 
Church of Quincy 

40 West St., Quincy, MA 02169 
(617) 770-2246 

Sen/ice Wednesdays 8pm 
Pastor Rev. Rita S. Berkowitz, C.H.CM. 



TO ADVERTISE IN 

THIS DIRECTORY, 

CALL 471-3100 



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'..! if.-><<iPi'>»t»i«'»<^' 



Page 22 Thm Qulaoy Sun Thursday, July 6, 2000 



•^♦t»t'' 



Eleanor B. Seely, 86 

Homemaker 



Thomas F. Galligan, 51 

Self-employed Carpenter 



Marjorie A. Henry, 74 

student Loan Officer 



Funeral services for 
Eleanor B. (Campbell) Seely, 
86, a lifelong Quincy resi- 
dent, a homemaker, were held 
July 1 at Fort Square Presby- 
terian Church, 16 Pleasant 
St. 

She died June 27 at home 
after a brief illness. 

Mrs. Seely had worked as 
a telephone operator for New 
England Telephone Com- 
pany. She was a lifelong ac- 
tive member of Fort Square 
Presbyterian Church and was 
a member of the Penn's Hill 
Senior Citizens. 

She was educated in 



Quincy schools and was a 
graduate of Quincy High 
School. 

Mrs. Seely is survived by 
her husband, John W. Seely; 
a son, John B. Seely of 
Quincy; and a daughter, 
Bonnie L. Seely of Quincy. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Sweeney Brothers 
Home for Funerals, 1 Inde- 
pendence Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to Fort Square Presbyterian 
Church, Missions Fund, 22 
Pleasant St., Quincy 02169. 



A funeral service for Tho- 
mas F. Galligan, 51, a life- 
long Quincy resident, a self- 
employed carpenter, was 
held July 1 at Dennis 
Sweeney Funeral Home, 74 
Elm St. 

He died June 28 at home 
after a long illness. 

Mr. Galligan was a mem- 
ber of the Town River Yacht 
Club. 

Bom in Boston, he was 
raised and educated in 
Quincy. He was a graduate 
of Don Bosco High School 
and Newman Preparatory 
School. He attended Suffolk 



University. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Gail (Gordon) •Fenton 
Galligan; his mother. Myrtle 
(McGilvray) Galligan of 
Quincy; a brother, Timothy 
Galligan of Quincy; a step- 
son, Michael Fenton; a step- 
daughter, Susan Fenton; a 
granddaughter and four neph- 
ews. 

He was the son of the late 
Thomas F. Galligan. 

Burial was private. 

Donations may be made 
to Hospice of the South 
Shore, 100 Baystate Dr., 
Braintree 02184. 



A funeral Mass for 
Marjorie A. (Johnson) Henry, 
74, of Wollaston, a student 
loan officer at Capital Bank 
and Trust in Boston for 18 
years, was celebrated July 1 
at St. Ann's Church. 

She died June 27. 

Born in Boston, Mrs. 
Henry lived in Dorchester for 
20 years before moving to 
Wollaston 10 years ago. 

Wife of the late John E. 
Henry, she is survived by two 
sons, James T. Henry of 
Randolph and William C. 
Henry of Westwood; three 
daughters, Helen A. Travers 



of Wollaston, Marianne 
Mann of West Yarmouth and 
Elizabeth B. Wenefowicz of 
Westboro; 12 grandchildren 
and two great-grandchildren. 

She was the mother of the 
late Michael J. Henry and 
John E. Henry Jr. 

Burial was in St. Joseph's 
Cemetery, Boston. 

Funeral arrangerfients 
were by Alfred D. Thomas 
Funeral Home, Milton. 

Donations may be made 
to Caritas Good Samaritan 
Hospice, 3 Edgewater Dr., 
Norwood 02062. 




SCOTT DEWARE 



4 Vfovefrr 

Ever wonder why people will remain loyal 

to one product or one firm over another? We 

feel that the biggest reason is service...There 

still remains a vast difference in the quality of 

the services offered by different firms. We are 

well aware that the public knows this, and 

here at Deware, each family is considered 

special. Our service is always personalized, 

NEVER ROUTINE. Your wishes and needs are always first in our thoughts 

and whatever they may be, you can depend upon us to give them our closest 

attention. 

A quote by Calvin Coolidge comes to mind : "No enterprise can exist for 
itself alone. It ministers to some great need; it performs some great service, 
not for itself, but for others; or failing therein, it ce&«es to be profitable and 
ceases to exist" 

If you should wish any additional information regarding our service, 
please contact us anytime...This, of course, is without cost or obligation... 

Deware Faimly Funeral Homes 

Serving All Faiths & Nationalities 



Wollaston Chapel 
576 Hancock Street 
Quincy, MA 02 170 



Hannel Chapel 

86 Copeland Street 

W. Quincy, MA 02169 



A (617) 472-1137 
Affordability Plus Service 
Advanced Planning • Cremation Service Available 
Services Rendered To Any Distance 



Ruth F. Colleton, 90 

Retired Clerk 

A funeral Mass for Ruth had lived in North Quincy 

F. (Fitzgerald) Colleton, 90, before moving back to Bos- 

of Boston, formerly of North ton 40 years ago. 

Quincy, a retired clerk, will She is survived by a son, 

be celebrated today (Thurs- Francis X- Colleton of 

day) at 1 1 a.m. at Keohane Florida; a daughter. Celeste 

Funeral Home, 785 Hancock M. Colman Of North Quincy; 



Edward H. Zdankowski, 77 

Retired Electronics Engineer 



St. 

She died July 1 at 
Neponset Circle Skilled 
Nursing & Rehabilitation, 
Boston. 

She worked at Traveler's 
Insurance Co. in Boston for 
25 years, retiring in 1966. 



12 grandchildren and eight 
great-grandchildren. 

She was the mother of the 
late Charles F. Colleton and 
the sister of the late John J. 
Fitzgerald. 

Burial will be in Mt. 



Bom in Cambridge, she Wollaston Cemetery. 

James McGahan, 42 

A funeral service for of Lourdes Church in Boca 

James Patrick McGahan, 42, Raton, 
of Boca Raton, Fla.,forrnerly Bom in Boston, he lived 

of Quincy, was held June 30 in Quincy for many years 

at the Babione Funeral Home before moving to Florida 1 



A funeral Mass for Ed- 
ward H. Zdankowski, 77, of 
Quincy, a retired electronics 
engineer, was celebrated 
Monday at St. 
Church. 

He died June 30 at South 
Shore Hospital in 
Weymouth. 

Mr. Zdankowski worked 
for Raytheon for 25 years, 
retiring in 1984. 

He was a World War II 
Army veteran. 

He was a member of the 
St,.Nlary's Churcl) Senior's 
Club. 

Bom in Boston, he had 
lived in Dorchester for mov- 
ing to Quincy 40 years ago. 



Zdankowski; two daughters, 
Nan M. Jones of Braintree 
and Paula Carroll of Sharon; 
a sister, Mary Greene of 
Mary's Quincy; five grandchildren 
and three great-grandchil- 
dren. 

He was the brother of the 
late Marion Zdankowski, 
Stanley Zdankowski and 
Alfred Zdankowski. 

Burial was in KnoUwood 
Memorial Park, Canton. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 

Donations may be made 
to WWII Memorial Fund, 
Attn.: GR048, P.O. Box 



in Boca Raton. 

He died June 27 in Florida. 

A funeral Mass was cel- 
ebrated June 30 at Our Lady 




Grandma loved 
classic poetry, 

traveling, 
and Grandpa. 

Your memories are precious. That's why, at 
Keohane Funeral Service, we take the time to 
find out what made your loved one special. 
Whether it's reading classic poetry or 

compiling a memory 
board of her favorite 
travel photos, you can 
count on us to help 
you plan a service that 
wall be just as unique as the person you love. 



785 Hancock Street • Quincy • 817-773-3561 

Kfgmber l»f Imritation f^^ NatiotuU SeUded Mortkiem 





years ago. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Judith C. Mezzetti of Boca 
Raton, Fla.; his parents, 
James A. McGahan and Mar- 
garet P. McGahan, both of 
Boca Raton; four stepsons, 
Robert Mezzetti, Paul 
Mezzetti, Scott Mezzetti and 
Marc Mezzetti, all of Quincy ; 
two brothers, Patrick Michael 
McGahan of Wellington, 
Fla., and Joseph Paul 
McGahan of Gardner; three 
sisters, Kathleen Hyde of 
Northboro, Maureen 
McGahan-Supple of 
Weymouth and Margaret 
Mezzetti of Wellington; eight 
nieces and nephews and 
many aunts, uncles and cous- 
ins. 



He is survived by his wife, 96074, Washington D.C. 
Mary T. (Gorski) 20090. 

Paul F. Tobin, 87 

Retired Auto Mechanic 



A funeral Mass for Paul 
F. Tobin, 87, of Quincy, a 
retired auto mechanic, will 
be celebrated today (Thurs- 
day) at 9 a.m. at Sacred Heart 
Church. 

He died July 1 at Quincy 
Medical Center. 

Mr. Tobin worked at H.P. 
Hood's in Charlestown for 
30 years, retiring in 1976. 

Bom in Beverly, he had 
lived in Quincy for the past 
60 years. 

Husband of the late Ethel 
M. (Bishop) Tobin, he is sur- 
vived by three sons, Thomas 
P. Tobin of New York, Paul 



F. Tobin Jr. of Weymouth 
and Arthur E. Tobin of 
Quincy; 11 grandchildren 
and three great-grandchil- 
dren. 

He was the father of the 
late Carol Weed. 

Burial will be in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 

Donations may be made 
to Quincy Medical Center 
Health and Education Foun- 
dation, 114 Whitwell St., 
Quincy 02169. 



Over 50 Years of Personalized Service 

SWEENEY BROTHERS 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 

JEFFREY F. SWEENEY 

1 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE 

QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 02169 

17) 472-6344 



. .A ■■ 



y 



■IHI 



Thursday, July 6, 2000 Tbe Quinoy Sun Page 23 



James G. Carroll, 90 

Braintree Civil Defense Director 



S 



Ruth M. Carlson, 90 

Retired Housemother 



Jo-Ann M . Clapp, 56 

Worlced At The Former Bargain Center 



A funeral Mass for James 
G. Carroll, 90, former Civil 
Defense director for the 
Town of Braintree, was cel- 
ebrated today (Thursday) at 
9 a.m. at the Church of St. 
Thomas More by the Rev. 
James J. McCarthy. 

Mr. Carroll died July 1 at 
Harbor House Nursing and 
Rehabilitation Center in 
Quincy after a period of de- 
clining health. 

He was a lumber yard 
manager with Grossman'sin 
Braintree and later with its 
successor company, Evans 
Products. He also worked for 
the Maytag Co. in Cam- 
bridge. 

He was a longtime mem- 
ber of the Church of St. Tho- 
mas More in Braintree and a 
member of the Knights of 
Columbus, Braintree Coun- 
cil 1462. 

Mr. Carroll was a gradu- 
ate of Boston Latin School 
and Holy Cross College, 
Class of 1934. 

Bom in Boston, he had 
lived in Braintree 55 years 
before moving to Quincy less 



than a year ago. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Catherine J. (McCarthy) 
Carroll; three sons, James E. 
Carroll and William V. 
Carroll of Hanover, and 
Charles A. Carroll of Hawaii; 
two daughters, Susan 
O'Gorman of Hawaii and 
Sheila M. Kelley of North 
Andover; a brother, John 
Carroll of Ware; two sisters, 
Rita Carroll of Needham and 
Gertrude Donovan of 
Marlboro; 15 grandchildren; 
4 great-grandchildren; and 
many nieces and nephews. 

He was the father of the 
late Catherine Foley of 
Westport, Conn. 

Burial will be in Holyhood 
Cemetery, Brookline. 

Visiting hours were 
scheduled Wednesday from 
4 to 7 p.m. at Mortimer N. 
Peck-Russell Peck Funeral 
Home, 516 Washington St., 
Braintree. 

Donations may be made 
to the Church of S^ Thomas 
More, 8 Hawthorne Rd., 
Braintree. 



A funeral Mass for Ruth 
M. (McGahey) Carlson, 90, 
of Quincy, a retired house- 
mother for the former Quincy 
City Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, was celebrated June 30 
at St. John the Baptist Church. 

She died June 27 at 
Quincy Medical Center after 
a brief illness. 

Mrs. Carlson had been the 
night housemother at the 
nursing school's Gordon 
House for 14 years, retiring 
20 years ago. 

She was a member of St. 
John' s ChurctxLadies Sodal- 
ity. 

She was bom in Boston, 
educated in South Braintree 



and had lived in (^incy since 
1932. 

Wife of the late Frank W. 
Carlson, she is survived by 
two daughters, Lucille M. 
Costello of Phoenix, Ariz., 
and Ruthann Giacobbe of 
Weymouth; 10 grandchildren 
andfour great-grandchildren. 

She was also the mother 
of the late Doris L. Larkin. 

Burial was in St. Mary's 
Cemetery, Randolph. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Sweeney Brothers 
Home for Funerals, 1 Inde- 
pendence Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to charity. 



Robert P. McDonald, 68 

Retired Quincy, North Quincy Mailman 



A funeral Mass for Rob- 
ert P. McDonald, 68, who 
wodced for the Post Office 
for 32 years, was celebrated 
Wednesday at St. Agatha's 
Church. 



Columbus, Council 5027 of 
South Weymouth,* and 
Braintree American Legion 
Post 86. 

Bom and raised in Milton, 
he attended public schools 



A funeral Mass for Jo- 
Ann M. (O'Shaughnessy) 
Clapp, 56, of Quincy, who 
worked at the former Bar- 
gain Center in Quincy Square 
for more than 20 years, will 
be celebrated today (Thurs- 
day) in St. Jerome's Church. 

Mrs. Clapp died July 1 at 
(Juincy Medical Center after 
a long illness. 

After working at the Bar- 
gain Center, she was em- 
ployed at Bradlee's and 
Shaw's Supermarket. 

She enjoyed roller skat- 
ing and was a member of the 
Skating Club at the Roll-Land 
Skating Rink in Norwood. 

Bom in North Weymouth, 
she was raised and educated 
in North Weymouth. She 
lived in North Quincy for 22 
years. 

She is survived by her 



husband, Roger W. Clapp; 
her parents, John and Kay 
(McArdle) O'Shaughnessy 
of North Quincy; three broth- 
ers. Jack O'Shaughnessy of 
Norwell, Robert 

O'Shaughnessy of 

Marshfield and Neil 
O'Shaughnessy of Halifax; 
three sisters, Kathy Rawdon 
of Braintree, Denise Mazzola 
of Kingston and Sheila 
Walter of Colorado; and 
many nieces and nephews. 

Visiting hours were 
scheduled fro 2 to 4 and 7 to 
9 p.m. Wednesday at the 
McDonald Funeral Hoihe, 40 
Sea St., North Weymouth. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Leukemia 
Society, 495 Old Connecti- 
cut Path. Suite 220, 
Framingham, MA 1 70 1 . 



Blood Pressure Clinic 



Mr. McDonald died July there. He lived in Quincy the 
1 at C^incy Medical Center, past nine years. 



Karin Erlandson-Russell, 81 

Received Swedish Medal Of Honor 

AfiineralserviceforKarin She was the wife of the 

Linnea (Berg) Erlandson- late Ralph Erlandson. She is 

Russell, 81, of North Quincy survivedbyherhusband,Bert 

and formerly of Dorchester, Russell; two sons, Lee 

a recipient of the Swedish Erlandson and Jay Erlandson 

Medal ofHonor, will be con- of Texas; three daughters, 



He was a mailman in 
Quincy and North C^incy 
until his retirement in 1987. 

He was an Army veteran 
of the Korean War and was a 



He is survived by two 
brothers, Francis B. 
McDonald of North Quincy 
and Richard J. McDonald of 
Warren; a sister, Ann M. 



Blood pressure clinics are 
offered at 10 a.m. on the sec- 
ond and fourth Tuesday of 
each month at Hancock park 
Adult Day Health Center 
(part of Hancock Park Reha- 
bilitation and Nursing Cen- 



ter) located at 164 
Parkingway, Quincy. 

The public is welcome to 
a free blood pressure check 
by a nurse from Managed 
Health Care Systems. 



member of many veterans' Steigner of Canton; and a 
organizations, including the special friend, Hilda 
American Legion and Kickham of Quincy. 




ducted today (Thursday) at 
11 a.m. at Faith Lutheran 
Church, 201 Granite St., 
Quincy. 

Mrs. Erlandson-Russell 
died July 1. 

She received the Swedish 
Medal of Honor from Carl 
Gustav XVI, King of Swe- 
den, for her efforts in Swed- 
ish-American relations and 
customs. 

She loved ballroom and 
Swedish folk dancing. She 
was a 1935 graduate of 



Kaarin O'Brien of Scituate, 
Linnea Erlandson-Smith of 
Randolph and Elsa Cook of 
Maine; a brother, Bruce 
Brusberg of Sweden; six 
grandchildren, two great- 
grandchildren and many 
nieces, nephews, great and 
great-great nieces and neph- 
ews. 

Visiting hours were 
scheduled Wednesday from 
2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. at 
McDonald Funeral Home, 
809 Main St., South 



AMVETS. 

He was a longtime mem- 
ber of St. Agatha' s Church in 
Milton. 

Mr. McDonald was a 
member of the Knights of 



Burial was in Knollwood 
Memorial Parte, Canton. 

Funeral arrangements 
were made by the Alfred D. 
Thomas Funeral Home, 
Milton. 



Eivera F. Bates, 93 

Secretary And Boolikeeper 



Chariestown High School Weymouth, 
and a member of the South Donations may be made 
Shore Viking Association. to the Alzheimer's Founda- 
She worked for tion.l Kendall Square, Build- 
Dorchester Savings Bank ing 200, Cambridge, MA 
before retiring many years 02139. 
ago. 

Jean L. Seitz, 80 

Former Clerk In Quincy Tax Department 



A funeral Mass for Eivera 
F. (Firmani) Bates, 93, of 
Clearwater, Fla., formerly of 
(Quincy, asecretary and book- 
keeper at the former Stocker 
Lumber Co. for many years, 
was celebrated June 29 at St. 
John the Baptist Church. 

She died June 5 in 
Clearwater after a long ill- 
ness. 

Bom and raised in (^incy, 
she was a graduate of Quincy 
High School. She lived in 



(Juincy most of her life be- 
fore moving to Clearwater 
20 years ago. 

Wife of the late Henry E. 
Bates, she is survived by a 
son, Henry E. Bates Jr. of 
Fort Bragg, Calif.; and sev- 
eral grandchildren. 

Burial was in Mt. 
WoUaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Sweeney Brothers 
Home for Funerals, 1 Inde- 
pendence Ave. 



Thomas C. Walsh, 34 



A funeral Mass for Jean 
L. (DiBona) Seitz, 80, of 
Quincy, a former clerk in the 
City of Quincy tax depart- 
ment for eight years, will be 
celebrated today (Thursday) 
at 9 a.m. in St. John the Bap- 
tist Church, 44 School St., 
Quincy. 

Mrs. Seitz died June 30 at 
Massachusetts General Hos- 
pital, Boston. 

She previously worked at 
the (Juincy Chamber of Com- 
merce for several years. 

She was a member of 
Stella del Nord and the 
Quincy High School Class 
of 1939 Reunion Commit- 
tee. 

A lifelong Quincy resi- 
dent, she was a graduate of 

yl> c ^> c <.»vi. <>.v c*:* c^.>.> «> 



Wilfred Beauty Academy of 
Boston. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Robert D. Seitz; a 
son, Leonard R. Seitz of 
Quincy; two daughters, 
Jacquelyn Seitz Loud of 
Quincy and Kimberiy Jean 
Donlan of Hingham; a sister, 
Annette DiBona of Quincy; 
five grandchildren; and many 
nieces and nephews. 

Burial will be in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Visiting hours were 
scheduled Wednesday from 
4 to 8 p.m. at Sweeney Broth- 
ers-Home for Funerals, 1 In- 
dependence Ave., Quincy 
Center. 

Donations may be mad& 
to charity. 



A funeral Mass for Tho- 
mas C. Walsh, 34, of Quincy, 
was celebrated June 29 at St. 
Mary's Church. 

He died June 25 atCaritas 
Good Samaritan Hospital in 
Brockton after a long illness. 

Bom in Portland, Maine, 
he was raised and educated 
in Quincy, and lived there 
for many years. He was a 
resident of New England 
Sinai Hospital in Stoughton 
for the past 12 years. 

He is survived by his par- 
ents, Thomas "Knobby" 
Walsh and Mary J. (Coletti) 



Walsh, both of Quincy; a sis- 
ter, Cheryl Walsh Barter of 
Quincy; two nephews, 
Michael Barter and Shawn 
Barter, both of Quincy; and 
many aunts, uncles and cous- 
ins. 

Burial was private. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Dennis Sweeney 
Funeral Home, 326Copeland 
St. 

Donations may be made 
to the New England Sinai 
Hospital, 150 York St., 
Stoughton 02072. 




WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



American Heart 
AssodadonJ 



i 







«l»4M>MiMh»aMiMI 



Early Retirement? 
Think Twice! 

By LAURIE ZASTROW 

If you are married, have been the primary wage earner 
in your family, and are thinking about filing for early 
retirement, there are some things you should consider. 

Most people know they can collect reduced Social 
Security retirement benefits as early as age 62. However, 
most people don't know that collecting Social Security 
before their full retirement age can reduce the benefit 
amounts paid to their survivors. 

Consider the following couple ~ Tom was bom in 1938 
and has just turned 62. His wife, Shirley, has woiiced, but 
Tom has been the primary wage earner in the family. Tom 
is thinking about when he should start collecting Social 
Security. ^"^ 

Social Security will compute a "basic benefit" for Tom. 
His basic benefit depends on how much he has earned over 
his lifetime. If Tom waits until his full retirement age to 
collect Social Security, he will receive 1(X) percent of his 
basic benefit every month for the rest of his life. For 
someone bom in 1938, such as Tom, the full retirement age 
is 65 years and 2 months. 

If Tom collects Social Security before this age, his 
monthly benefit will be reduced. For example, if he 
collects Social Security starting at age 62, his monthly 
benefit amount will be about 79 percent of his basic 
benefit. 

Tom's choice of when to start receiving Social Security 
not only affects how much he gets each month, but also 
affects how much Shirley will get from Social Security if 
Tom dies before she does. When Tom dies. Social Security 
will pay Shiriey a widow's benefit. 

If Tom waits until his full retirement age to collect 
Social Security, Shiriey's benefit will be 100 percent of 
Tom's basic benefit. If, however, Tom received early 
retirement benefits, her widow benefit will be lower. In 
general, the longer Tom waits to collect Social Security, 
the higher Shirley's widow's benefit will be. 

According to Social Security, there are currently three 
million widows and widowers who have less income 
because they were married to people who filed for early 
retirement benefits. 

A representative at your local Social Security office can 
talk with you and your spouse about your specific situa- 
tion. When you are fully informed, you can make the 
decision that is right for both you and your family. 
(Laurie Zastrow is Social Security manager in Quincy^ 



Page 24 Tl&« Quinoy Sun Thursday, July 6, 2000 



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ARIES (March 2 1 to April 

19) You feel ready to face up 
to a major change, although it 
might involve some risks. A 
once-dubious family member 
comes around and offers sup- 
port and encouragement. 

TAURUS (April 20 to 
May 20) Move forward with 
your plans, despite discour- 
aging words from those who 
underestimate the Bull's 
strong will, your keen 
instincts will guide you well. 

GEMINI (May 21 to June 

20) A misundentanding is 
easily cleared up. Then go 
ahead and enjoy some fun 
and games this week. A 
Libra might have ideas that 
merit serious consideration 
fw the future. 

CANCER (June 21 to 
July 22) You might feel as if 
you're in an emoticMial pres- 
sure cooker, but the situation 
is about to change in your 
favor. Take time out for 
some well-earned fim. 

LEO (July 23 to August 
22) A shift in your work- 
place responsibiUties creates 
resentment among some co- 
workers. Deal with it before 
it becc»nes a threat to your 
success on the job. 

VIRGO (August 23 to 
Sqptember 22) Expect some 
surprises in what you 
thought was one of your typ- 
ically well-planned sched- 
ules. Deal with them, and 
then enjoy some light-heart- 
ed entertainment 

LIBRA (September 23 to 
October 22) Be careful: What 
appears to be a solid financial 
opportamty might have some 
hidden risks attached. A hazy 



personal matto- needs to be 
cleared up. 

SCORPIO (October 23 to 
November 21) It's a good 
time to strengthen ties with 
family and friends. You 
might feel unsure about a 
recent, workplace decision, 
but time will prove you did 
the right thing. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov- 
ember 22 to December 21) 
Just when you thought yow 
relationship was comfortable 
and even predictable, your 
partner or spouse could 
spring a potentially life- 
changing surprise on you. 

CAPRICORN (Decem- 
ber 22 to January 19) Your 
usually geno-ous self is 
overshadowed by your 
equally strong suspicious 
nature. You might be judging 
things too harshly. Keq) an 
open mind. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 
to February 18) Love and 
romance dominate the wedc. 
Married Aquarians enjoy 
domestic harmony, while 
singles could soon be wel- 
coming ovotures from bv- 
ingLeos. 

PISCES (Febniary 19 to 
March 20) An old health 
problem recurs, but it is soon 
dealt with, leaving you eager 
to get back into Ihc swing of 
things. A favorable travel 
period starts this week. 

YOU WERE BORN 
THIS WEEK: You have an 
independent spirit that 
resists being told what to do. 
But you're also wise enough 
to appreciate good advice. 

O 2000 King Features Synd, be. 



Wishing ib Well® 



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Tkunday, July 6,2000 TIm Qnlnoy Sua 9mgt2S 



John Boucher President, 
COO At South Shore Savings 



Anthony Agnitti Receives 
Chamber's *Spirit Award* 



Arthur R. Connelly, 
chairman and chief execu- 
tive officer of South Shore 
Savings Bank, announces 
the promotion of John C. 
Boucher of East Bridgewa- 
ter to the newly created po- 
sition of president and chief 
operating ofHcer. 

The move was voted 
unanimously by bank trus- 
tees and corporators at their 
annual meeting. 

"Over the years, I have 
watched John develop into a 
superb banker in the true 
sense of the word," said 
Connelly. "He understands 
and appreciates the flnancial 
services industry, but he has 
the ability to view it through 
the lens of the community 
and the customer. 

"It is that type of vision 
and leadership that will pro- 
pel South Shore Savings 
Bank to new heights," Con- 
nelly added. "John Boucher 
is the perfect one to carry 
that torch going forward/' 

Boucher joined South 
Shore Savings Bank in 1973 
and has held positions of; 
increasing responsibility, 
most recently as executive 
vice president and chief 
operating ofHcer, in charge 
of planning and policy im- 
plementation in the areas of 
retail banking, human re- 




JOHN BOUCHER 

sources, marketing and fa- 
cilities. 

In addition to acting as 
clerk of the bank's Board of 
Investment, he is a member 
of the executive committee 
and also serves on the 
Community Reinvestment 
Act (CRA) committee and 
the technology committee. 
He is also a corporator of 
South Shore Savings Bank. 

Boucher is also involved 
in a number of civic and 
community activities. He is 

a director of the South 
Shore Chamber of Com- 
merce, a member and past 
chairman of the Weymouth 
Business Council, and an 
overseer of South Shore 
Hospital. In addition he 
serves as trustee of the 



Bridgewater State College 
Foundation, chairman of the 
Mass. Bankers Association 
Group Insurance Trust, and 
is a member of the Mass. 
Bankers Association Health 
Advisory Committee. He is 
a director and past president 
of the Weymouth High 
School Alumni Association. 
Boucher was president of 
his Weymouth High School 
graduating class,. 

He holds the Bachelor of 
Science degree from Boston 
State College and has also 
completed studies at the 
Massachusetts School for 
Financial Studies, the 
Graduate School of Banking 
at Fairfield University, and 
the Executive Development 
Program at Fairfield Uni- 
versity. He is married and 
the father of three children. 

Connelly, former presi- 
dent and CEO, is now 
chairman and CEO. 

South Shore Savings 
Bank, which operates under 
an 1833 state charter, has 
offices in the South Shore 
communities of Quincy, 
East Bridgewater, Hanover, 
and Weymouth, including 
an Educational and Training 
Facility at Weymouth High 
School. The hank is a mem- 
ber of the FDIC/DIF. 



Anthony L. Agnitti, 
owner of Agnitti Insurance 
Agency Inc., of Quincy and 
Agnitti Property Manage- 
ment, was recently honored 
at the South Shore Cham- 
ber's annul breakfast. 

Agnitti was presented 
with The Spirit of the South 
Shore award and recognized 
for his service as a Board of 
Director and active member 
of the South Shore Commu- . 
nity. 

"Tony is a tremendous 
positive example of a local 
business person working for 
a strong business while sup- 
porting his community, a 
good man to work with!" 




ANTHONY AGNITTI 

said Dean Rizzo, head of 
Community Development 
for the Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

Agnitti is on the Board of 



Horizon Bank, Chairman of 
the Advisory Board for the 
Salvation Army, past presi- 
dent of Quincy Kiwanis, 
Chairman of the Quincy 
Business Council and is 
involved in several charities 
in Quincy. 

He sponsors Quincy 
youth teams and is active on 
several scholarship boards. 

Agnitti 's philosophy is: 
"We are all one and inter- 
related; citizens, businesses 
and communities. Service to 
the betterment of the com- 
munity not only forges fu- 
ture leaders, but allows us as 
a great city to continue to 
have a high quality of life." 



President's Wreath 

To Commemorate 

John Q. Adams Birthday 



A wreath from the White 
House will be placed on the 
tomb of President John 
Quincy Adams in a cere- 
mony Monday, July 10 at 
noon at United First Parish 
Church, also known as 
"Church of the Presidents," 
1306 Hancock St., Quincy 



Center. 

The wreath laying cere- 
mony marks the 233rd 
birthday anniversary of the 
sixth President of the United 
States. 

Commander Charles 
Wiseman of the Naval Re- 



$6,500 In Houghs Neck 
Scholarships Awarded 



Houghs Neck Commu- 
nity Council scholarships 
totaling $6,500 will be 
given to five high school 
graduates and six college 
students at an open meeting 
Tuesday, June 20, at 8 p.m. 
at the Houghs Neck Com- 
munity Center. 

This will make a total of 
$115,470 given to qualify- 
ing students since the first 
award was given in 1964. 

Awards are based on 
qualifying scholastic rec- 



ords. 

Scholarship Chairman 
David DIBona will present 
awards to the following 
high school graduates: 
Amanda Loos, entering 
Mass College of Liberal 
Arts; Caitlin Nichol, enter- 
ing Northeastern University; 
Timothy Pezzulo, entering 
Northeastern University; 
Nicole Boudreau, who will 
choose among UVM, Roger 
Williams, or Quinnipiac 
University; and Colleen 
Nichol, entering Assump- 



tion College. 

College students re- 
ceiving awards include: 

Katrina Skayne, sophomore 
at UMass-Amherst; Tina 
Katsarikas, senior at 
UMass-Amherst; Colleen 
Clarke, senior at Bridgewa- 
ter State College; Nicole 
Goldrick, sophomore at 
Curry College; Pamela 
Gray, junior at Providence 
College; and Dennis Kohut, 
senior at UMass-Dartmouth. 
All have lived in Houghs 
Neck for five years or more. 



North Quincy Students Win 
State Street, BFDS Art Awards 



Edward Callahan 
Joins Army Reserve 

Edward J. Callahan has diers receive advanced indi- 

joined the U.S. Army Re- vidual training in their ca- 

serve under the Delayed reer job specialty. 
Training Program. • Callahan, a 2000 gradu- 

. ate of Bridgewater- 

He will have the oppor->Raynham High School, 

tunity to become eligible to Bridgewater, will report to 

receive more than $7,000 port Benning, Columbus, 

toward a college education, Qa., for basic training. 
$20,000 for repayment of He is the son of Kathleen 

college loans, and a maxi- m. Houten of 86 Main St., 

mum $5,000 cash bonus. Quincy, and Edward J. Cal- 

After completion of basic jahan of 570 Plymouth St., 

military training, most sol- Bridgewater. 

Jennifer Akoury On Dean's List 

Jennifer A. Akoury of spring semester. 

Quincy has been named to She is in the Class of 

the Dean's List at Framings 2001, majoring in clothing 

ham State College for the and textiles. 



serve Center in Quincy will 
present the wreath on behalf 
of President Clinton. Mayor 
James Sheets, City Council 
President Paul Harold, 
Quincy Historical Society 
Director Edward Fitzgerald 
and Rev. Sheldon Bennett, 
minister of the church, will 
offer brief remarks. 

After the ceremony, a 
tour of the church and the 
crypt will be offered. The 
public is invited and admis- 
sion is free. 






GRANITE 
lOCKCO 



SERVICE 



MOBILE 



AUTO • HOME • BUSINESS 

•KADeommSTAUID 
•LOOSREKEVED 
•DONOOSEB 
•PANKHAIOWiUtE 
' •AUTO KEYS FITTED 
VISIT OUR SHOWROOMl 
755 SO. ARTERY, QUma 

472-2177 



t 



im- 



State Street South and 
Boston Financial Data 
Services (BFDS) have an- 
nounced the winners of their 
annual People's Choice Art 
and Photography Awards. 

Students from North 
Quincy High School sub- 
Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



mitted a sample of their 
work in either art or photog- 
raphy. Employees of the 
two companies then voted, 
with the winners receiving a 
cash prize in one of two 



<^tegories. 

The winners are: Megan 
Cassidy, Aaron Allen, Re- 
becca Wall, Alex Harris, 
Ryan Minezzi, Natalie 
Barahona, and Brian Clark. 



Poor Credit? 

Divorce? 
Banluiiptcy? 

We can finance a home 

and give you A BETTER 

RATE AND LOWER 

FEES than other tough 

credit lenders. 

WELLS FARGO 

HOME MORTGAGE 

#1 in America 

Call Michelle Solomon at 

781-356-4600 

MA Lie #1147 

til 

Equal Housing Lender 




36 Eliot 
Bar 8c Bistro 

Bistro & Al Fresco Dining 

Live Entertainment 
Fuactions for All Occasions 

Dinner Served Wed-Sun. 5- 10pm 

36 Eliot St., mitoti. MA 02186 

6 1 7-696- 1116 Fax 6 1 7-696-4998 

Located in the Historic Milton Hill House 
Milton - Lower Mills Dorchester Town Line 





BREAKFAST 

7 days a week 

all day 



Early American Restaurant 

Since 1988 

1054 Hancock Street, Quincy • 328-8225 

Open Daily at 7am 
HOUSE SPECIALTY - Our Famous Homemade Corned Beef Hash 




Will Be Closed Saturdays 
During July and August. 

Have A Nice, Safe Summer. 



' -* x'jAmi^wi ->■■ mat wtfw '■ 



; ^^'«j|«-<iM'i»»^ '<«Mft^i A «»»^ '. 



Page 26 Tbe Qixinoy Sun Thursday, July 6, 2000 




FOR THE EASTERN 

DISTRICT OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

Bankruptcy Case 
No. 94-10312 WCH 
Adversary Proceeding 
No. 00-1282 
In re DIMITRIOS K. 
SPILIAKOS 
Debtor 

ANASTASIA ROZANITIS, 
CHAPTER 1 1 PLAN ' 
TRUSTEE, Plaintiff 
V. 
MARIA SPILIAKOS (a/k/a 
Maria Spiliakos Katsiada) 
Defendant 
SUMMONS IN AN 
ADVERSARY 
PROCEEDING 
AND NOTICE 
BY PUBLICATION 
To the above-named 
defendant: 

A Complaint fias been 
entered in the U.S. 
Bankruptcy Court,. 

Massachusetts District, to 
Sell Property of the Chapter 
1 1 Estate in which you have 
an interest as Co-Owner, to 
wit: 2-8 Ebbett Av, Wollaston, 
MA 02170. You are hereby 
summoned and required to 
submit a motion or answer to 
the Complaint, a copy of 
which is on file with the Court 
and at the Office of the 
Plaintiff's Attorney, listed 
below. Said Motion or 
Answer must be delivered to 
the clerk of the bankruptcy 
court within 30 days after the 
date of Publication of this 
Notice, except that United 
States and its offices and 
agencies shall submit a 
motion or answer to the 
complaint within 35 days. 

Address of the Clerk: 
UNITED STATES 

BANKRUPTCY COURT, 
THOMAS P. O'NEILL 
FEDERAL BUILDING, 10 
CAUSEWAY STREET, 11TH 
FLOOR, BOSTON, MA 
02222. 

At the same time, you 
must also serve a copy of the 
motion or answer upon the 
plaintiff's attomey Name and 
Address of Plaintiff's 
Attorney: BRIAN E. 
DONOVAN, 18 RUSSELL 
PARK,QUINCY, MA02169. 
If you make a motion, your 
time to answer is governed 
by Bankruptcy Rule 7012. 

IF YOU FAIL TO 
RESPOND TO THIS 
SUMMONS, YOUR 

FAILURE WILL BE 
DEEMED TO BE YOUR 
CONSENT TO ENTRY OF A 
JUDGMENT BY THE 
BANKRUPTCY COURT 
AND JUDGMENT BY 
DEFAULT MAY BE TAKEN 
AGAINST YOU FOR THE 
RELIEF DEMANDED IN 
THE COMPLAINT. THE 
ANSWER IS DUE AUGUST 
8, 2000. A PRETRIAL 
HEARING WILL BE 
SCHEDULED WHEN THE 
ANSWER IS FILED. 

JAMES M. LYNCH 

CLERK OF THE BANKRUPTCY 

COURT 

DATED: JUNE 22, 2000 

JOAN M. DWYER, DEPUTY 

CLERK 

7/6/00 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 

Here's a chance to 

earn extra money 

by building a Quincy 

Sun home delh^ery 

route. 

Telephone 
4 . 471-3100 



wncE 

iOHiMiiJMHiUliiiidtiaiiiiliiiMMi 

COf^MONWEALTH OF 




MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 00P1 55 1EP 
In the Estate of 
JAMESJ.MCHUGHAKA 
JAMES J. MCHUGH, JR. 

Late Of QUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
Date of Death June 9, 2000 

NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

To all persons interested 
in the above captioned 
estate, a petition has been 
presented praying that the 
last will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
JAMES J. MCHUGH III of 
DUXBURY in the County of 
PLYMOUTH and PATRICIA 
ALONSO of MASHPEE in 
the County of BARNSTABLE 
be appointed executors, 
named in the will to serve 
without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO 
OBJECT THERETO, YOU 
OR YOUR ATTORNEY 
MUST FILE A WRITTEN 
APPEARANCE IN SAID 
COURT AT NORFOLK ON 
OR BEFORE TEN 
O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00 AM) ON 
August 9, 2000. 

In addition, you must file 
a written affidavit of 
objections to the petition, 
stating specific facts and 
grounds upon which the 
objection is based, within 
thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
NORFOLK this day, June 28, 
2000. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/6/00 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 92P1939E1 

Notice Of Fiduciary's 
Account 

To all persons interested 
in the estate of John R. Burr, 
late of Quincy, in the county 
of Norfolk. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rule 72 that the first and final 
account of Patricia A. 
Cleasby as Executrix (the 
fiduciary) of said estate has 
been presented to said Court 
for allowance. 

If you desire to preserve 
your right to file an objection 
to said account, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before the 
twenty-sixth day of July, 
2000, the return day of this 
citation. You may upon 
written request by registered 
or certified mail to the 
fiduciary, or to the attorney 
for the fiduciary, obtain 
without cost a copy of said 
account. If you desire to 
object to any item of said 
account, you must, in 
addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, file 
within thirty days after said 
return day or within such 
other time as the Court upon 
motion may order a written 
statement of each such item 
together with the grounds for 
each objection thereto, a 
copy to be served upon the 
fiduciary pursuant to Mass. 
R. Civ. P. Rule 5. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this fifteenth day of 
June, 2000. 

THOMAS PATRK:K HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
7/6/2000 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 00P1523EP 
In the Estate of 

ALFRED K. MAGGIANI 

Late Of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

To all persons interested 
in the above captioned 
estate, a petition has been 
presented praying that the 
last will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
MICHAEL A. MAGGIANI of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK and ROBERT K. 
MAGGIANI of WEYMOUTH 
in the County of NORFOLK 
be appointed executors, 
named in the will to sen/e 
without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO 
OBJECT THERETO, YOU 
OR YOUR ATTORNEY 
MUST FILE A WRITTEN 
APPEARANCE IN SAID 
COURT AT NORFOLK ON 
OR BEFORE T^ 
O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON ( 1 0:00 AM) ON 
August 9, 2000. 

In addition, you must file 
a written affidavit of 
objections to the petition. 
Stating specific facts and 
grounds upon which the 
objection is based, within 
thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
NORFOLK this day, June 21 , 
2000. 

THOMAS PATRK;K HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/6/00 



June 5, 2000 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 2000-172 
ORDERED: 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy, that the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Quincy, 1 993, as amended, t>e further amended as follows: 

In Title 10: Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10.12.040 Stop Signs-Authorized where: 



ADD THE FOLLOWING: 
Watson Road Broadway 



p m eQT ioN 

Westbound 



TYPE OF REGULATION 

STOP 

A TRUE COPY 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

Clerk of Council 



Classified 



X-Ray Technician 

with some medical assis 
tant experience - per 
diem/part time. Fax re- 
sume (781) 356-4887 



7/6 



Gardener Wanted 

Squantum yard seeking 
person who likes gardening 
and perennials for regular 
plant care. Will pay hourly. 
Call 786-9435 



7/13 




7/6/00 




INVITATION TO BID 

CITY OF QUINCY MASSACHUSETTS 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
1305 HANCOCK ST, QUINCY MA 02169 
Invites sealed bids/proposals for furnishing and delivering to the City of Quincy: 



PARK DEPARTMENT 
SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



GRAVEL 
SCHOOL BUSES 



,, 



Detailed specifications are on file at the office of the Purchasing Agent, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, Quincy, 
Massachusetts, 021 69, between the hours of 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. 

Bids must state exceptions, if any, the delivery date and any allowable discounts. Bids/Proposals must be in a sealed 
envelope (which is supplied). The outside of the sealed envelope is to be clearly mari<ed "BID ENCLOSED" with time/date 
of bid call. 

Firm bid prices will be given first consideration. Bids/Proposals will be received at the office of the Purchasing^gent until 
the time and date stated above, at which time and date they will be publicly opened and read. Late Bids/Proposals, delivered 
by mail or in person, will be rejected. 

If applicable. Bids shall be in accordance with Chapter 149 of the M.G.L. as amended. M.G.L., Chapter 39, section 39A, 
39B and 39F-R. M.G.L. Chapter 149, Section 26, 27, 29, 35 and 44A-44M. 

The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to accept any part of a bid or the one deemed best for the City, and waive 
any informalities in the bidding, if it is in the best interest of the City to do so. 

James A. Sheets, MAYOR 
, .,. ^ Alfred J. Gra2ips9.,J/, p^|^fi^V),^ljsJ,(^Q^iyj, ^ 

•716/00 *■ 



Divine & Pearson Wins 
Four Public Relations Award 

Devine & Pearson received quadruple honors at 
Communications, a fully- the 31st annual Bell Ringer 
integrated communications Awards, 
agency based in Quincy, The awards were 

presented by the Publicity" 
Club of New England, 
recognizing excellence in 
the field of public relations. 
Honors received by 
Devine & Pearson include a 
Bell Ringer Award in the 
category of "Product/ 
Service Publicity" on behalf 
of the National Turkey 
Federation; a Bell Ringer 
Award in the category of 
"Special Publications" on 
behalf of the Starwood 
Hotels & Resort Worldwide, 
Inc.; a Merit Recognition 
Award in the category of 
"New Product Launch" on 
behalf of Starwood Hotels & 
Resorts Worldwide and a 
Merit Recognition Award in 
the category of "News 
Release -- Regional" on 
behalf of Codman, a 
Johnson & Johnson 
company. 

Horizon Bank 

Re-elects 
Five Directors 

Horizon Bank of 
Braintree has re-elected five 
directors to serve three-year 
terms on the Bank's Board. 

They are: 

Stephen C. Alexander, 
president of Alexander and 
O'Keefe of Braintree; 
Edmund J. Corvelli, Jr., 
former owner, president and 
CEO of New England Book 
Company, Inc.; Phyllis P. 
Godwin, chairman and CEO 
of Granite City Electric 
Supply of Quincy; Kevin G. 
Rooney, president of K. 
Rooney, Inc., of Weymouth; 
and Brian Williams, 
president of Williams Coal 
and Oil Company of 
Braintree. 

Also, at the annual 
meeting. Horizon 

announced its first profitable 
quarter since opening in 
June of 1998 for the quarter 
ending March 3 1 , 20(X). For 
the first quarter of 20(X), the 
bank realized a profit of 
$96,472, compared to a loss 
of $205,586 for the same 
period last year. 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 00P1 51 SEP 
In the Estate of 

RUTH N. HENDERSON 

Late Of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

To all persons interested 
in the above captioned 
estate, a petition has been 
presented praying that the 
last will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
DONALD P. READY of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
executor, named in the will to 
sen/e without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO 
OBJECT THERETO, YOU 
OR YOUR ATTORNEY 
MUST FILE A WRITTEN 
APPEARANCE IN SAID 
COURT AT NORFOLK ON 
OR BEFORE TEN 
O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00 AM) ON 
August 2, 2000. 

In addition, you must file 
a written affidavit of 
objections to the petition, 
stating specific facts and 
grounds upon which the 
objection is based, within 
thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITfsJESS, Hon. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
NORFOLK this day, June 21 , 
2000. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/6/00 



JULY 20, 2000 d 10:30 A.M. 
JULY 20, 2000 9 10:45 A.M. 



'«. T I. ». . ».' .» 
'*. -t* ». ^. •-**»*• • 



».i. .' J r t' .'!• *-i w .•'.' ■• 



WE'RE 
FIGHTING 

FOR 
YOUR LIFE 



AnKiican 



Heart gj^ 



Thursday, July 6, 2000 The Qttlncy Sim Page 27 




A NEW HALL 

Elks Lane, off 254 Quarry St. 

For Weddings, Showers, 

Meetmgs arid Banquets. 

QUINCY ELKS 

847-6149 



TF 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy 
K of C Building 

5 Mollis Avenue 

For Information Please Call 

767-0519 



TF 



The Bryan Room VFW 

24 Broad St., Quincy 

2 newly renovated 
function halls available. 

Large room 400+ 
small room 1 50 guests. 

1-800-474-6234 tf 



HERITAGE HALL 

American Legion Post #114 
Weddings, Meetings, All 

Occasions 

114 Granite Ave., Milton 

617-696-3836 



TF 



Be A Newscarrier! 
Call 471-3100 



HAND TOOLS WANTED 

Wood or steel planes. Also, 
chisels, clamps, tool chests, 
old handtools, all trades (ma- 
chinist, pattern maker, watch- 
maker, etc.) shop lots. Also, 
antiquarian books, frames, 
paintings, crocks, lanterns. 
Antiques in estate lots. 

1-617-558-3839 tf 



REALltTATE 



Marim. Bay area 

600 sq. ft. office /w 

parking $475/mo. 

617-328-1443 

328-0102 r. 



...^'^., ^^...^f^^t.^.^.. 



Prayer and understanding of 
God, also called Spirit, Truth, 
Mind, Soul and Love in the 
Bible, brings us into natural 
health as we realize our own 
native spirituality. Anyone can 
be helped in prayer and heal- 
ing - phone Finn (617) 448- 
1053, 6-7am, 8-10pm or 
weekends. 



Wallpaper and Painting 

hy the Paperboy 

Gerard Shea 

Graduate of US School of Profes- 
sional Paper Hanging, Rutland, VT 
617-471-5089 



Roman Electric 

Residential, Commercial, Maim Systems, 
AC Installations, Fast Response, Free 
Estimates. Fully insured. Lie ^37566. 
781-601-6302 or 1-877-41-ROMAN 

visit us at www.Romanelectric.net tf 



Weddings 

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMES 

Weddings from $998 

James Kazolias 

Osslpee, N.H. 
1-800-322-0454, evenings 



7/22 



S'^^l'WWf""^^!?^^ 



'*■ ^ 



EAT ALL DAY 
& MELT AWAY! 

Call (617) 696-8358 

Email: 

weightloss @ma. freei. net 

7/20 



Precision Heating & Air Conditioning 

Tie Om ^tof £twie* CtmfiMuf 

We Service & Install 

• Oil/Gas Heating Systems • Oil/Gas Water Heaters 

• Oil/Gas Burners • Residential Air Conditioning 

• Oil Tanks Removed & Replaced 

Service . . . It's Our Only Business 

Annual Tune Ups $70, Includes nozzle & oil filter 

617-472-8641 24 hour Emergency Service Jerry LaFlamme 



TF 



Timothy J. O'Brien 

Building & 

Remodeling 

Decks, Dormers, 

Additions, Siding, 

Windows, Repairs 

479-6685 

Licensed, Insured 
Free Estimates 

MA Reg. #116180 



TF 




Seeking LICSW to facili- 
tate educational groups 
for victims of domestic 
violence. Candidate 
should possess at least 
5 years experience lead- 
ing DA/ groups and have 
related work experience 
in a law enforcement 
setting. Send resume to 
Sheila Craven, Norfolk 
D.A's Office, PC Box 
380, Canton, MA 02021 



7/6 



Victims Advocate - 
Seeking bi-lingual ad- 
vocate to work with 
Asian victims of crime. 
B.A. required. Work in 
a law enforcement set- 
ting and participate in 
community activities. 
Send resume to Sheila 
Craven, Norfolk DA's 
Office, PO Box 380, 
Canton, MA 02021 7/6 



$9.00/HOUR TO START 



• RGIS INVENTORY SPECIALISTS IS LOOKING FOR SELF- 
MOTIVATED INDIVIDUALS LOOKING FOR WORK IN A FAST- 
PACED ENVIRONMENT. 

• NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY 

• RGIS HAS IMMEDIATE OPENINGS FOR INVENTORY 
AUDITORS 

•ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE RIGHT PEOPLE 

• DAY AND NIGHT/WEEKEND POSITIONS AVAILABLE. 
AVERAGE HOURS DEPEND ON YOUR SCHEDULING 
AVAILABILITY. 

• PAID TRAINING FOR QUALIFIED APPLICANTS. 

• MUST BE 18 YEARS OF AGE. 

• WILLING TO WORK IN/AROUND GREATER BOSTON AREA 

• HAVE ACCESS TO TRANSPORTATION. 

• MOST LOCATIONS T ACCESSIBLE. 

CALL THE BOSTON CENTRAL OFFICE AT 
. 617-484-1788 MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 9AM-4PM 
WE ARE AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 
RGIS INVENTORY SPECIALISTS a/31 



93 T Bird Super Coupe 

$6995 

92 Lincoln T. Car 

$9995 

90 Chev Conv. Van 

$2995 

98 Windstar Cargo Van 

$11,995 

90 Isuzu Trooper 4x4 

$2495 

86FordPUF150 

$995 
88 Chev. Blazer 

$995 

90 Olds Cierra V6 

$2495 

South Street Auto Sales 

577 South Street 

Quincy, MA 
617-773-5642 



7/6 



Save Gas & Money.. 
Sfiop Locally! 



Computer Support 

Are you computer savvy or 
need PC guidance? Do you 
need MS office, internet sup- 
port or computer mainte- 
nance? 617-328-4761 7/6 

Lawford Plumbing 

Small Jobs • Faucet 
• Toilet & Heat Repairs 

• Drain Cleaning 

• Garbage Disposals 

Installed 

24 Hour Service. 

Master Lie. #7306 

781-849-6184 9/7 



Windows Wash 
Please call 
328-4819 
328-0726 7/20 



HOUSECLEANER 

Clean by Maria Fatlma 

A professional housecleaner 

10 experience 

excellent references 

Call 508-872-2613 



8/10 



Les Young's 
Complete Handyman Services 

All the Little Things 

Carpentry, Painting, Window 

Repair & Replacement, 

Bathrooms, Tile Work, 

Cabinets/Tops 

617-328-5855 



8A3 



A & T VACUUM 

• $19.95 Overhaul Special 
on any vacuum. 

• Sewing machine repairing 

• VCR repairing and cleaning 

• Sharpening 
(scissors, icnives, etc.) 

• Greek XL Vacuums $249 

• Electrolux w/power nozzle $199 

• Used vacuums $45 & up 

27 Beale St., Wollaston 
479-5066 



TF 



KEITH'S SERVICES 

Gen Building Maintenance 

Call for all your Interior 

& Exterior needs 

Insured, Quality Workmansliip, Great Rates 
617-479-8852 781-254-6769 
781-834-1229 tf 



YARD SERVICES 

LAWNS MOWED, 

RAKING, TRIMMING, 

MULCHING, 

FERTILIZING ETC. 

ODD JOBS 

FREE EST 

CALL 61 7-770-4593 

1-800-670-0868 tf 



H/I&J Residential 
Services 

Interior* Extorior painting, car- 
pentry, gutter services, 
yardworii & all related handy 
man services. Free estimates. 
Milie 328-8648 



7/6 



E & K Construction 

Remodeling, Kitchens & Baths, 
Windows, Finished Wori<, Gen- 
eral Carpentry & Painting. 
Brendan 617-328-6240 
Derniot 617-787-4924 8/31 



Cross Painting & Carpentry 

Commercial/Residential 

Interior/Exterior 

Free Estimates 

617-847-3017 

Email: Bernardcross@yahoo.com 7/6 



Your South Shore 
Headquarters For 
Appliance 
Service 
& Parts 
For All 
Major 
Appliances 



hta 



hancock tire 
& appliance 

115 Franklin Street 
South Quincy 472-1710 




YARD WORK CO. 

• Reliable Lawn 
Mowing Sen/ice 

• Expert Bush & Hedge 
Trimming 

• Yard Cleanup 

• Fertilize Lawn 

• Mulch Work 

Experienced 
FREE Estimate 
Call Bill Fielding 

471-6124 



T. Lynch Electric 

Residential, Commercial 
No job too small. 

Fully insured, lie #39339, 

free estimates 

781-335-4081 m? 



CARPENTRY 

"It's A Little Job" 

Expensive, NO! 

Your price will fix it right 

617-472-0556 a/a, 



O'Meara's 
Painting Co. 

Great Rates 
617-840-4987 , 



POWER WASHING 

Houses - Decks - Walkways 
Stone & Block Walls 

General Cleanup, General 
Maintenance. Also trucks, buses. 
Rich Ryan (B) 617-560-5203 
(H) 471-0761 



7'6 



Sun Classified Ads 
Get Results! 




MtfTim 



LEARN A NEW SKILL - 

CUSTOMER 

SERVICE REP 

FREE Training for 

the Job of Tomorrow. 

If you "like people" and work 

in retail or wor1< as waitstaff 

now is the time to get new 

skills for the new workforce 

of the millennium. 

Customer Service 

Representatives 

Classes are 
beginning NOW! 
Call 'for an appointment or walk in 
(we are directly across from tlie Quincy Center T) 
We also do office clerical and administrative placements. 

Join GSR Solutions Today 

1212 Hancocl< Street, #101, Quincy 

617-472-9009, Fax 617-472-1991 

email: csrsolutions@msn.c9m 



Specializing In S«ndc» Staffing 





MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 

RATES 

IWEEK □ $5.50 for one insertion, up to 20 words, 

100 for each additionah word. 

3-7 WEEKS □ $5.00 per insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 insertions of 

the same ad, 100 each additional word. 

8-12 WEEKS □ $4.60 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 8- 1 2 insertions 

of the same ad 100 for each additional word. 



INDEX 

□ Services 

□ For Sale 
Q Autos 

□ Boats 

□ For Rent 

□ Wanted 

□ Help Wanted 

□ Work Wanted 

□ Pets 

□ Lost & Found 

□ Real Estate 
Q Antiques 

Q Flea Markets 

□ Yard Sales 
G Instruction 

□ Day Care 

□ Personal 

□ Miscellaneous 



13 WEEKS 
OR MORE 



□ Enclosed is $ 
weeks in 

COPY: 



□ $4.30 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 1 3 or more 
insertions of the same ad 100 for each additional word. 

^__ for the following ad to run 



NO REFUND WILL BE MADE .AT THIS CONTRACT RATE IN THE EVENT OF CANCELLATION. 
DEADLINE: MONDAY, 5:00PM. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMBER IN Aa T 



]£Dil 



Pi^28 Tlf Qttiney Sim Thm-Bday, July <, KWt 



House Approves $100,000 
For Town Brook Flood Project 



NQHS Senior Stay-Out Committee 
Awarded Prom Safety Grant 



(Cont 'dfrom page I) 

area's fishing fleet and 
tourism industry; 

• $8.6 million to acceler- 
ate the long-overdue reha- 
bilitation of the Cape Cod 
Canal Railroad Bridge in 
Bourne; 

• $8.8 million to operate 
and maintain the 17.4-mile 



Cape Cod canal and adja- 
cent recreation areas, as 
we!l as the Bourne and Sa- 
gamoic Bridges. 

The funding was part of 
the FY2001 Energy and 
Water Appropriations bill. 
The project involves the 
assistance of the U.S. Army 
Corps of Engineers. 



Delahunt started work on 
these projects last year, at 
the begiiming of the current 
federal budget cycle. Now 
that the Energy and Water 
measure has passed the 
s house, he will continue to 
work closely with Sens. Ted 
Kennedy and John Kerry for 
favorable review 



The North Quincy High 
School Senior Stay Out 
Committee was recently 
awarded a prom safety grant 
by Norfolk County District 
Atty. William Keating. 

The after prom commit- 
tee recently sponsored its 
fifth successful party. 

The Norfolk County 
District Attorney's office 



helps sponsor safe, respon- 
sible and alcohol-free post 
prom activities through 
these grant funds. 

"Tlie Quincy conmiunity, 
particularly high school par- 
ents, should be commended 
for taking such a proactive 
approach to prom safety. 
I'm proud to be able to sup- 
port the community's efforts 



in this small way," Keating 
said in announcing the 
grant. 

"Congratulations again, 
and thank you for your sup- 
port of programs like this 
that help keep our young 
people safe during prom and 
graduation season," he 
added. 




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with VCR 






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Provides up to 6 hours of playing/recording time. 





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Count on people who care» ' 




Clieclcing Out 
Local Beaches 

— Page 3 — 


Spotting A 
Shoplifter 

— Page 19 — 


WEATHER FORECAST 

Friday: Partly Sunny, 80-85 p- ,^ 
Saturday: Chance Of Rain, 70-75 1^1 
Sunday: Chance Of Rain, 75-80 ^ 



The Quizicy 



Historic Quinci;'s Hometown M/eefc/y Newspaper 




VOL.32 No. 42 



Thursday, July 13, 2000 



On Long Island It Was 
Like A Front Row Seat 



fk;. 



wh*- 



y^ 



' .^ 




RUSSIA'S KRUZENSHTERN, a 376-foot barqn?, was Sail Tuesday. And watching the parade from Long Island 
one of the top crowd pleasers In the Tall Ships Parade of was like having a fh>nt-row seat. 




THE THREE MASTED Danmarl^ a 253-foot Class A 
ship fkt>m Denmark, was another bvorite in the Parade of 



(Quincy Sun PhotoslRobert Noble) 
Other photos on page 11 



Granite Rail Could 
Be Park By 2001 

Agreement 

On Need 

To Fill 

Quarry 

By CRAIG SALTERS 

Neighbors who have been plagued down through 
the years with drinking, diving, drownings, and 
murders in the city's qiHlrry area now have the 
support of others in their quest to have the Granite 
Rail Quarry filled in. 
Agreement on that point should be filled in," said 
came at a public meeting Thomas Bonomi of Bates 
held by the Metropolitan Ave, a lifelong Quincy resi- 
District Commission (MDC) dent whose family has 
Monday night at City Hall strong roots in West 
to discuss plans to build a Quincy. "It's the only real 
"safe and accessible urban solution. I'm glad these 



park" there by the spring of 
2001. 

The meeting, run by 
MDC General Counsel 
Thomas Gray, was conten- 
tious at times and there was 



groups (the MDC, the 
climbers, the preservation- 
ists, etc.) are finally working 
together." 

Other residents echoed 
Bonomi's concerns and 



by no means consensus as to warned that, even if only a 

the future role of the park or small amount of water were 

the details of its construe- left in the quarry, there 

tion, but there was general would still be the temptation 

agreement on one issue: the for kids to jump, 
quarry, as is, is a safety haz- The informal meeting, 

ard, responsible for many Gray said, was meant to 

deaths over the years, and gather feedback from resi- 

that hazard must be ad- dents and interest groups 

dressed. before the MDC goes before 
"I think the quarry (Cont'd on page 28) 

Quincy Homestead 

Open But By 
Appointment Only 



Quincy residents and 
tourists can now view the 
interior of the historic Do- 
rothy Quincy Homestead 
after all — but they'll have 
to make an appointment to 
take the tour. 

The Quincy Sun dis- 
closed last week that the 
house at Butler Road and 
Hancock Street where John 
Hancock wooed and won 
his Dorothy has been closed 
to visitors this season- , 



» « * ♦ f 



»♦♦«♦#♦»♦♦♦»»♦♦«*♦♦«*♦ «♦''''■'♦♦**•• 



*««<<«<>»<*•• 



• t i » 4 i 



Not quite so, said Julie 
Guild, chairman of the 
Quincy Homestead for the 
Massachusetts Society of 
Colonial Dames, who oper- 
ate the house under a 99- 
year lease from the MDC, 
the owners since 1904. 

"We are now open for 
tours by appointment only," 
said Guild in a letter to the 
Sun. "This is stated on the 
sign by the gate with our 
»' (Cdnt'Aonpagell) 



Pa{{e 2 Tb* Qiilnoy Sim Thursday, July 13, 2000 




ANNE MARIE REARDON, standing beside Deputy Director of Quincy EmergenQr 
Management Anthony Siciliano, Is a member of the Cotnmunity Emergency Response 
Team (CERT) who is currently serving as the Ship Liaison for the aircraft carrier 
John F. Kennedy during the current Sail Boston 2000 celebrations. Reardon is a 
student at North Quincy High School. (Emergency Management Photo) 



PRABHOD SUNKARA (in blue shirt), a student of Quincy High School and member 
of the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT), serves as the interpreter 
aboard the INS Mysore, an Indian destroyer docked in Boston for the Sail Boston 2000 
celebrations. Here Sunkara is with some of the ship's officers. (Anthony Siciliano Photo) 



Quincy Teens Liaisons Aboard JFK, Indian Ship 



Two Quincy residents, 
both members of the Com- 
munity Emergency Re- 
sponse Team (CERT), are 
serving aboard vessels dur- 
ing the Sail Boston 2000 
celebration. 

Prabhod Sunkara, a 16- 
year old who attends Quincy 
High School, is the Hindi 
interpreter for the Indian 



destroyer INS Mysore, 
which will be docked in 
Boston until July Nth. 
Among Sunkara's many 
jobs are giving instructions 
to the general public and 
interpreting any questions 
visitors may have for the 
ship's captain. 

Erin Marie Reardon, who 
attends North Quincy High 



School, serves as the Ship 
Liaison to the aircraft carrier 
USS John F. Kennedy. 
Reardon shuttles back and 
forth between the JFK and 
the Black Falcon Cruise 
Terminal, reporting on any 
necessary assistance while 
the ship is in port. 

From July 11 to 21, the 
Quincv Emergency Man- 



CALLING ALL PARENTS!!!! 



ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A QUAUTY FULL TME 
PROGRAM FOR YOUR 3 OR 4 YEAR OLO CHILD 
FOR NEXT SEPTEMBER??? 



CALL MRS. SMITH AT 617-479-7980* 

and learn about the new integrated 
preschool program 9t the 

CHILDRENS DEVELOPMENTAL 

DISABILITIES CENTER 

105 Adams Street 

Quincy MA 02169 




To qualify both parents must be working full or 

part time. Sliding fee scale. Applications 

being accepted NOW. 



WOMEN'S HEALTH CARE AT SOUTH SHORE HOSPITAL 



The regions leaders 

in womens health care 

are in your region 

Whether you're thinking about having a baby, approaching 
mid-life, or well into your senior years, here's great news: 
Physicians and midwives affiliated with South Shore Hospital — 
the region's nunnber one choice for women's health care — 
have offices nearby. 

So If you're planning for a new phase of your life or just looking 
for a change, call us today. 

Call 1 -800-325-5454 or visit 

www.southshorehospital.org for a referral 

or for a list of women's health care providers. 



South Shore 
Hospital 



55 Fogg Road at Route 18, South Weymouth, MA • wvvvv.southshorehospital.org 




agement Agency, Commu- working in Boston as Sail messages to locations 
nity Emergency Response Cadets, delivering items and around the city of Boston. 
Team members will be 

QHA Sets Rent Caps 
For Federal Housing 



The Ouincy Housing 
Authority held a special 
board meeting recently and 
approved a new flat rent 
structure for its federal 
housing developments to 
become effective October 1. 

The new maximum caps 
for federal housing are: one 



bedroom, $564; two bed- 
room, $706; three bedroom, 
$883; and four bedroom, 
$1,036. 

The move is intended to 
benefit tenants who now 



must pay 30 percent of their 
income on rent. 

According to the QHA, 
roughly 180 Quincy resi- 
dents live in federal housing 
developments. 



tciDM 



Sara Gordon Graduates From BC 

Sara Gordon of Quincy recently graduated from 

Boston College with a 
bachelor's degree in human 
development. 

She is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Martin H. 
Gordon, Rock Island Rd., 
Quincy^ 



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"T"=^" 



Thursday, July 13, 2000 Tl&e Qulncsy Sun Page 3 



Includes Water Quality Hotline, Locations, Tidal Charts, Plus 

Guide To City's Beaches Now Available 

*^i(K'„* y* **^j-<tJXf, U9wr*4- 



The Quincy Beaches and 
Coastal Commission an- 
nounces the first edition of 
■'A Guide to Quincy's 
Beaches," which is available 
at public libraries, commu- 
nity centers, and various 
shops and restaurants across 
the city. 

Leo Kelly, chairman of 
the commission, said the 
guide was a direct result of 
the commission's recent 
survey, which was returned 
by over 2,000 residents. 

The survey, Kelly said, 
reflected a desire by resi- 
dents for more information 
3n the 27 miles of Quincy 
shoreline. "Residents want 
and need to be informed 
about our area," Kelly said. 

In a letter which begins 
the guide, Mayor James 
Sheets said it was time for 
Quincy residents to once 
again make use of a cleaner, 
improved waterfront. "We 



want to encourage all the 
residents of our great city to 
return to the beaches," 
Sheets said. "There is no 
greater resource than our 
coastline and beaches." 

The guide contains a list 
of shoreline beaches and 
their locations, available 
forms of transportation, and 
other pertinent information 
such as tidal charts, a map, 
and the city's 24-hour Water 
Quality Hotline which is 
(617) 376-1288. 

Kelly said 5,000 copies 
of the guide, which also 
contain a brochure from the 
Quincy Health Department 
on the city's Beach Water 
Sampling program, were 
printed by the city's Data 
Processing Department. 

Along with Wollaston 
Beach, which is considered 
a Quincy beach for the pur- 
poses of the guide although 
it is managed by the MDC, 



the beaches listed are: Nick- 
erson Beach; Orchard 
Beach; Post Island Beach; 
Parkhurst Beach; Rhoda 
Beach; Edgewater Drive 

Beach; Baker/Broady 
Beach; Avalon Beach; and 
Mound Street Beach. 



aid, and Michael Morad for 
their work on the Beach 
Guide Committee. 

Other Quincy Beaches 
and Coastal Commission 
members are: Doug Gutro, 
vice chairman; Monique 
Flaherty; P.J. Foley; Jane 



Water Quality Hotline 

For Quincy Beaches 

376-1288 




Kelly thanked Mayor 
Sheets and the city's Park, 
Health, Data Processing, 
and Planning Departments 
for their efforts on the guide 
and singled out commission 
members Margaret Milne 
(secretary), Anne McDon- 



Gallahue; Bob Galligan; 
Joseph Joy; Bob Lescinskas, 
Sr.; David Murphy; Jack 
Nigro; and Bemie Reisberg. 
Copies of the guide are 
available at the Quincy Sun 
office at 1372 Hancock St., 
Quincy Center. 




ERIKA MOLIGNANO is lucky enoi^h to receive one of the 
first copies of A Guide to Quincy's Beaches, hand-delivered 
by Leo Kelly, chairman of the Beaches and Coastal 
Commission. The free booklet, which contains pertinent 
information on the city's 10 public beaches, is available at 
libraries, community centers, and various businesses 
throughout the city. (Presidential Camera Photo/Dan Cannon) 



Sheets: State Street's Carter TivotaF In Saving Of Hospital 



When Mayor James 
Sheets declared, "Marshall 
Carter and State Street are 
friends of Quincy" at recent 
ceremonies at the Snug 
Harbor School, the mayor 
had more in mind than just 
pleasing political rhetoric. 

And he had more in 
mind, even, than the reason 
for the Snug Harbor cere- 
mony: State Street's Mil- 
lennium Gift pf $250,000, 



presented by its chairman 
Carter, for the construction 
of a new Germantown 
Neighborhood Center. 

What Sheets was talking 
about was the top story of 
1999: the saving of Quincy 
Hospital, now Quincy 
Medical Center. 

Sheets described for the 

audience a Spring 1999 

phone conversation in 

.which Carter, a member of 



the board of Boston Medical 
Center, reminded Sheets of 
that fact and asked if there 
was anything he could do to 
help the situation. 

A few days later, Sheets 
said, the mayor called Car- 
ter and Carter arranged, and 
attended, a crucial first 
meeting between Sheets and 
Boston Medical Center 
CEO Elaine Ullian and Vice 



President Paul Drew. "And 
the rest, as they say, is his- 
tory," said Sheets. 

It was Quincy Hospital's 
affiliation with Boston 
Medical Center which made 
the federal, state, and local 
bailout possible and essen- 
tially saved the hospital. 

"Marshall Carter played 
a pivotal role," said Sheets. 
"He's the one who put us 



together with Boston Medi- 
cal Center and we owe him 
a debt of gratitude." 

Sheets' remarks come as 
high praise, indeed, as 
Sheets is generally consid- 



ered the single most impor- 
tant figure in the saving of 
the hospital. 

State Street Corporation 
employs over 12,000 work- 
ers in the city of Quincy. 



We need 
you 



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FOR YOUR LIFE 



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business, but the way they charge 
and the way they behave have to 
make you wonder. At Colonial 
Federal, we treat customers right. 
We make it easy for you to get your 
checking account with no monthly fee. Our savings & CD rates apply 
equally to new & current customers. And, unlike big banks, we don't 
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Tkiinday,Jdyl3,2tM 



Opinion 




USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Ck). Inc. 

1372 Hancock St.. Quincy, MA 02169 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. Publisher 
Robert H. Bosworth Editor 

35« per copy. $16.00 per year by mail in Quincy 
$18.00 per year by mail outside Quincy. $22.00 out of state. 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Periodicals postage paid at Boston, MA 

Postmaster Send address change to 

The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy MA 02169 

The Quincy Sun asaumos no financial mponsitMlity kx typographicai emxs m 
advwiisefnents bU tMM reprinl thai part o( an advertisefnart in which Itw typographicai 
error occurs. 



Faxon Park Tour 
Reveals History 

Of Stone Benches 



At a recent tour of Faxon 
Park sponsored by the Park 
Department's Environ- 
nental Treasures of Quincy 
Program, Dave Murphy, 
urogram manager at the 
Park Department, explained 
Jie history of the stone 
xnches scattered through- 
3Ut the park. 

The benches. Murphy 
aid, were constructed in the 
I930's by the Works Project 
Administration. The piace- 
nent of the benches and the 
lesign of the park was in- 
luenced by the ideas of 
Frederick Law Olmstead, 
ne nn>i landscape architect 
n the United States. 

In 1870 Olmstead wrote, 
'We want a ground to 
.vhich people may easily go 
ifter their day's work is 
done, and where they may 
itroll for an hour, seeing, 
liearing, and feeling nothing 
Df the bustle and jar of the 



streets, where they shall, in 
effect, fmd the city put far 
away from them. 

"Practically, what we 
want most is a simple, broad 
open space of clean green- 
sward, with sufficient play 
of surface and a sufficient 
number of trees about it to 
supply a variety of light and 
shade." 

To that end, one goal of 
the tour was for participants 
to experience the park as 
one of the few remaining 
oases in the city where resi- 
dents can retreat from the 
noise and stress of urban life 
to enjoy the quiet of a natu- 
ral environment. 

The next walk in the En- 
vironmental Treasures of 
Quincy program will place 
Saturday, July 22, at 4 p.m. 
at Squantum Point Park. For 
more information, contact 
the Park Department at 376- 
1254. 



THEHISTORYCHANNEL 

On July 14, 1099, during the First Crusade, Christian knights 
under Raymond of Toukxise, Godfrey of Bouillon, and Tancrcd 
of Taranto captured JenisaJem after seven weeks of sieging and 
began massacring the dry's MusUm and Jewish population. ... 
On July 12, 1862, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln signed into 
law a measure calling for the awarding of a U.S. Army medal of 
honor, in the name of Congress, "to such noncommissioned offi- 
cers and privates as shall nxist distinguish themselves by their 
galkotjy in acuoD, and other soklier-like qualities dunng the pre- 
sent insurrection." ... On Ju!y U, 1863. during die Civil War, 
major riocs broke out in New York Ciiy against the implementa- 
tioo of the first wartune draft of U.S. civilians in American his- 
tory. ... On Jidy 14, 1881, on a ranch near old Fort Sumnez, 
N.M.. the infamous Weston oudaw known as "Billy the Kid" 
was shot to death by Pat Garrett the sheriff of Lincob) County. 
He was 21 years old. ... On July 10, 1890, Wyoming, whose 
constitutioD was the first in US. histny to guarantee women die 
rigN to vote, was admitted into the Union. ... On July 16, 1918, 
in Yekaterinburg, Russia, Czar Nicholas n and his family, under 
bouse anest by the Bolsheviks, were executed, formally ending 
tfvec centuries of &vc Romanov dynasty. They had been token to 
a cellar under the pretense of tuving their photograph taken 
when Bolshevik Qoops stormed in and shot them to death. ... On 
July 10, 1925, in Dayton, Tenn., the so-calkd "Monkey Trial" 
began with John Thomas Scopes, a young higti-school scioice 
teacher accused of tcachmg evoluticMi, which was in violation of 
a new Tennessee law. ... On Jidy 11, 1979, parts of Skylab, 
Aiixaica's first space station, came crashing down on Austndia 
and into the Indian Ocean five years after the last manned 
Skylab mis.sion etulcd. No one was recorded injured. ... On Jidy 
12, 1984. Waha Mcxidalc, the leading DenKxratic presidential 
candidate, announced that he had chosen Rep. Gerakline Foiaro 
of New York as his running mate. His enthusiastic keynote 
address inauguntfed a convention that saw Fenaro become the 
first woman nonmiatcd by a nuyor party for the vice presidency. 
„. On July 15, 1997, Andrew Cunanan, the gay serial killer who 
was 00 the FBI's Most Wanted List, murdaed world-renown 
Italian fniiian designer Gianni Vnsace on ihc steps outside his 
Kfiami masiaa. 

eaoooicii^riiiLiSywt,hc. 




SmMbestms 



By Henry Bosworth 



Kolson, Cheney Eye Return 




CHENEY 




KOLSON 



Two familiar political names may be back on the 
city election ballot next year. 

Both Michael Cheney and Peter Kelson are think- 
ing about a 
run for city 
councillor 
at-large. 

"I'm 
looking at it 
seriously," 
says Kolson, 
who lost a 
bid for one of 

the three at-large seats last year. And in doing so, gave 
up the Ward 1 seat. 

"I'm giving it some serious thought, 
says Cheney, who left the council three years ago be- 
cause of family considerations that don't exist now. 

An MBTA foreman, Cheney notes he will be retir- 
ing next June after 23 years. 

"That would give me the time to return to the city 
council," he says. 

Cheney served 13 years in the council as Ward 1 
councillor and at-large and did a hitch as council presi- 
dent. 

He now has a private consulting business and says 
one reason he would like to return to the council is 
thai: "There is a lack of common sense in the present 
City Council on business issues." 

Kolson, who held the Ward 1 seat for 10 years be- 
fore giving it up and served four years as council presi- 
dent, says people have been asking him to consider 
running again. 

He says he is watching the council meetings on cable 
TV. 

"I like to keep abreast of things," he says. 

Docs his miss being there as part of it? 

"Yes. 1 like to serve. I like to do things for people. 1 
like to have a voice in decisions affecting the city. I 
really thought I did a pretty good job as a councillor." 

Kolson was active in the community long before he 
got into politics. 

He was president of the Adams Shore Association, 
vice president of the Germantown Neighborhood As- 
sociation and vice president of the Quincy Citizens 
Association. 

He also served on various committees including the 
city's original recycling committee and one that suc- 

Free Smoking Cessation 
Programs At Medical Center 





CAHILL 




Bay State Community 
Services is offering free six- 
week smoking cessation 
programs at Quincy Medical 
Center. 

Charlene McDonald, 
smoking cessation coun- 
selor, will lead the group 
through a series of six 
smoking cessation counsel- 



We need you. 



American Heart 
AssodatioaJ 







WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR UFE 



ing sessions that provide 
education on methods for 
ceasing tobacco use, sup- 
portive counseling during 
the early quitting period, 
information and advice on 
nicotine replacement ther- 
apy and referral to individ- 
ual smoking cessation coun- 
seling. 

The next session, held on 
Tuesday evenings at 6 p.m. 
at the hospital, will begin on 
July 25 and continue 
through Aug. 29. Nicotine 
patches are available as part 
of this program free of 
charge along with counsel- 
ing. 

Call McDonald at (617) 
472-6027, ext 140, to regis- 
ter or for more informaticxi. 



cessfully fought off a proposed waste incinerator. 
Whether Kolson and/or Cheney run remains to be 
seen. 

An open council at-large seat 
would probably bring at least one 
of them back to the campaign trail. 
One possibility of an open scat: 
if Paul Harold wins the Norfolk 
County Register of Deeds post and 
decides not to seek re-election to 
the council. 

But there's nothing that says he 
can't hold both jobs. Tim Cahill 
decided to remain in the council 
after becoming country treasurer 
and has had no trouble handing the 
two jobs. 

If Harold decides to hold onto 
his council seat, and Frank 
McCauley runs for re-election, it 
would seem doubtful that both 
Kolson and Cheney would run. 

That would make four at-large candidates from Ward 
1 which would split a lot of votes and weaken all four 
candidates coming out of the same ward. 

□ 
SPEAKING OF McCAULEY, don't know if he is 
just having a little fun or that it's 
another sign he is actually think- 
ing of running for mayor next year. 
McCauley has a bumper sticker 
on his car left over from the last 
city election. 

It used to read: "McCauley, City 
Councillor." 

It now reads: "McCauley." He 
cut the councillor line off. 
Could it be that he plans to run for mayor and this is 
also a reminder that he knew how to save money when 
he was in that office. And still docs. 

□ 

CHARLES McINTYRE has rejoined the Norfolk 
County District Attorney's office as an assistant dis- 
trict attorney. His boss, Dist. Atty. 
William Keating, has assigned him 
to handle narcotics cases and spe- 
cial investigations. 

Mclntyre served as an assistant 
district attorney from 1994 to 1998 
under Dist. Attys. William 
Delahunt and Jeffrey Locke. 

The son of the late Mayor-Sena- 
tor James Mclntyre, he served 
briefly as a city councillor and observers were predict- 
ing a bright political career for him. 

Now that he's back in the D.A.'s office, it could still 
be there. 

a 

BRIAN McNAMEE is now the treasurer of the 
South Essex Sewerage District, a regional waste water 
treatment authority serving 
Peabody, Salem, Marblehead, 
Danvers and Beverly. Apptiintcd by 
the SESD Board of Directors, he's 
managing the district's funds which 
total over $30 million. 

McNamee, a former candidate 
for the Ward 6 city council scat, 
hasn't lost his interest in local poli- 
tics. Says he's keeping his options open. 



McCAULEY 




McINTYRE 




McNAMEE 



Thursday, July 13, 2000 TIm Quiz&cy Sun Page 5 



Scenes From Yesterday 




THIS IS A LATE 1920's postcard of Klein's drugstore 
on the corner of Beale and Hancock Streets in 
Wollaston Center. A second floor was later added to 
the Klein Building but the first floor remains pretty 
much the same as here. It is now the site of the 
Blackwood Pharmacy Medical Supply which is one of 



the last two independently owned drugstores in Quincy. 
The Klein's name can still be seen in faded paint the 
top of the south side of the building. On the right the 
tall building is the Wollaston Theater which was built 
in 1926. 

From the Collection of Tom Galvin 



Quincy' s 
Yesterdays 



Jttly 13 - 19 
52Y(^rsAgQ 



Ri:ai)i Rs FokiiM 



Historic Quincy And Charles MacGiUiyary 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 
Congratulations once 
again fw The Quincy Sun 
edition of June 29, 2000 with 
the special Historic Quincy 
supplement. This isjiot only 
a valuable historic supple- 
ment, it is also an important 
updated addendum of our 
city's historical past. 

As a cominunity weekly 
newspaper you have captured 
the historical climate of opin- 
ion of past years with that of 
today. Quite often the news- 
papers of today are filled with 
sordid details of negative sto- 
ries about today's society. 
The Quincy Sun through its 
weekly news columns puts 
emphasis on the goodnews 



side 6foiir Quincy neighbor- 
hood communities. 

The Quincy Sun does not 
hesitate' flo^ jshow its patrio- 
tism. Quite unabashedly I 
join hundreds of Quincy resi- 
dents in flying our country's 
flag and by marching with 
fellow veterans in various 
parades to demonstrate that 
patriotism is alive and well 
in Quincy. Your newspaper 
bolsters that patriotic fervor. 

Just recently, coinciden- 
tally, your paper published 
the obituary of Charles A. 
MacGillivary, the local area 
Congressional Medal of 
Honor recipient. That same 
week a motion picture, "The 
Patriot," became a block- 



buster box-offied attraction. 

Charles MacGillivary was 
in reality a true patriot, not 
only for his heroism during 
the Battle of the Bulge in 
World War II, but also for his 
dedication and empathy in 
his later life for all disabled 
veterans,. . , 

When veterans returned 
from World War II afford- 
able housing was a number 
one priority. The cause of 
affordable housing led to the 
establishment of HoUghs 
Neck American Legion Post 
No. 380, which became 
Quincy's first World War II 
Legion Post. 

Charles MacGillivary 
served as mentor to the orga- 



nizers of that post in his ca- 
pacity as a disabled veteran. 
Post 380 leaders played a 
most important role in ob- 
taining affordable koMfmg 
for veterans in Quincy. The 
Quincy Housing Authority 
was established and Snug 
Harbor became the city ' s first 
veterans housing facility. 

That veterans housing fa- 
cility was Charles 
MacGillivary's legacy to his 
veteran colleagues from 
Quincy. He is a true patriot in 
more ways than the heroism 
he displayed during the Battle 
of the Bulge. 

John Noonan 

Alton Rd. 

Quincy 



A 'Thank You' For Jimmy Kennedy Memorial Run 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 
I am writing to thank you 
very much for your support 
of the recent third annual 
Jimmy Kennedy Memorial 
Run for ALS. This year's 
event, held on June 10 in 
Quincy, was a huge success 



with over 600 participants in 
the five-mile race and 2.5- 
mile fitness walk. It was a 
great day. 

Most importantly, ap- 
proximately $30,000 will be 
donated to the Cecil B. Day 
Laboratory at Massachusetts 



General Hospital for ALS 
research. I especially appre- 
ciated the outstanding 
Quincy Sun coverage includ- 
ing Mr. Noble's photos of 
the race and participants. 

Your cooperation was 
greatly appreciated, and I 



look forward to your contin- 
ued support in the future as 
we make the Squirrel Run an 
annual Quincy activity. 

Thanks again. 

Richard P. Kennedy 

Board of Directors 

Squirrel Run 



Boston Firefighters Bike For MDA 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

I would like to extend my 
appreciation to the 
firefighters who enthusiasti- 
cally joined together during 
the Boston Fire Department 
bike-a-thon. 

The bike ride began on 
Wednesday, June 7, in Lee 
and concluded 150 miles later 
in Boston on Sunday, June 
10. 

When the Boston Fire De- 
partment found out that Ed 
McLaughlin, a Boston 
firefighter for 29 years, was 
diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's 
disease, it wanted to support 
him. Throughout the years, 
Ed has selflessly devoted 
himself to the fire depart- 
ment and the surrounding 
community. Therefore, the 



decision to raise funds for recognize a cure for Lou Fire Department, for fight- 

the Muscular Dystrophy As- Gehrig's disease is only made ing much more than justfires. 

sociation was a no-brainer. possible through research Neil Martin 

The Boston firefighters grants. Thank you, Boston Boston Firefighter 

Ladder 15 
■ ■■■■■■ SUBSCRIPTION FORM ■■■■■■■■ 

FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 



1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 
CITY 



STATE 



ZIP 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 

[ ] 1 YEAR IN QUINCY $16.00 

[ ] 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY $18.00 | | CHECK ENCLOSED 

[ ] 1 YEAR OUT OF STATE $22.00 [ | PLEASE BILL ME 



Rotary Design 

To Solve 

Squantum Traffic 

By PAUL HAROLD 

The newly organized traffic committee of the Quincy 
Chamber of Commerce recommended a rotary design to 
solve the Squantum traffic prob- ,i,___,____,,___ 
lem. 

Z. Cranston Smith, the 
committee's chairman, said the ro- 
tary traffic design at East Squantum 
St. and Quincy Shore Drive would 
provide for the smooth flow of traf- 
fic and would resolve the dangerous situation at the inter- 
section. He noted that following a recent accient there the 
ambulance found it difficult to assist victims because of the 
traffic congestion. 

BRADFORD TO ATTEND OUTING 

George Daly, Jr., president of the Quincy Chamber of 
Commerce, announced that Governor Robert Bradford would 
attend the chamber's annual outing at the Braintree Rod and 
Gun Club. 

Ticket Chairman George Goodhue reported a record 350 
reservations for the full day program that included sports 
competitions and a clam bake. 

FUNERAL FOR COMMISSIONER DONOVAN 

A funeral was held at St. John's Church for James 
Donovan, the city's commissioner of public streets who 
worked for the city for nearly 40 years. He began work in 
1^8 under the administration of Mayor William Shea, fol- 
lowing his service in World War I. 

Mayor Charles Ross ordered an official mourning period 
for Donovan, calling his death "a tremendous loss to the 
citizens of Quincy." 

"I know of very few men whose record of public service, 
helpfulness to others, devotion to duty and interest in public 
affiars equals that of Mr. Donovan," Ross said. 
QUINCY-ISMS 

Amelio Delia Chiesa was a last minute entry in the Re- 
publican contest for state representative. Other candidates 
included Atty. Carter Lee of Wollaston on the Republican 
side with Democrats Atty. Robert Manning of North Quincy 
and Irving Coughlin of Quincy Point. . . The Rotary Club 
honored John Duane, founder of the wrecking company, on 
his 70th birthday. The surprise tribute was led by club presi- 
dent Robert Foy, Jr. Duane lived on Curtis Ave. He had five 
sons, two daughters and 23 grandchildren. . . Dr. Ensio 
Ronka, director at Quincy City Hospital, announced an in- 
crease in room rates for Quincy residents from $9 to $10.50 
a day. . . Eddie Easton, owner of Eddie's Diner, announced 
the opening of the Magnolia Room, with a seating capacity 
of 80. One of the opening specials was a five-course lobster 
dinner for $2.50. . . A Wollaston man was arrested for "reg- 
istering bets on the speed of horses." He was arrested in a 
raid on a Wollaston cafe. Two other raids in the city resulted 
in no arrests. Captain George Fallon, head of the detective 
bureau, was in charge of the crackdown on bookmaking. 
Working with him were special officers Thomas Fallon, John 
Fitzgerald, James Fay and Charles Griffin and Lt. Fred Young 
and Sgt. James Mullin. . . Camp Massasoit opened for its 
21st season. . . A son was bom to Mr. and Mrs. Timothy 
Reidy of Whitwell St. at Quincy City Hospital, a son was 
bom to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Williams of Curtis Ave. . . Mayor 
Ross expected that the Squantum School would be completed 
in time for a fall opening. . . Building permits for $7,000 
were granted to Louis Bregoli of Ballou St. and to Carl 
Trillcott on Woodcliff Rd. . . Mrs. Jennie Sandonato of Oak 
St. was elected president of the Mother Cabrinin Club. . . 
Paul Hurley defeated Dick Mahoney for the city singles 
championship at the Quincy Tennis Club. . . Some 1600 
members of the Fore River Credit Union were notifed of its 
closing. It had operated for 1 2 years, but Bethlehem Steel 
announced recently it would no longer help defray the costs 
of loans. The company spokesman said their new policy was 
"shipbuilding for shipbuilders and banking for bankers." . . 
. J. Everett Clohossey was tne new president of the Lions 
Club. . . The Quincy Catholic Men's Club sponsored a three- 
hour sports program at the municipal stadium to benefit the 
Archbishop Gushing Fund to build a new Catholic high 
school on the South Shore. William Joyce was club presi- 
dent. . . Third annual "Miss Quincy" beauty contest was 






announced by AMVETS. Last year's winner was Terry Gillis. 



Page 6 Tb* Quinoy Sun Thursday, July 13, 2000 



Summer Storyteller Series 
In 14th Season At Library 



Arts In The Parks Tonight 
At LaBrecque Field 



The 14th season of the 
Summer Storyteller Series 
continues Tuesday, July 18 
at 7 p.m. at the Adams 
Shore Branch Library, 519 
Sea St. with Storyteller 
Rona Leventhal. 

Leventhal is returning to 
Quincy with a collection of 
stories about the sea entitled 
"Selkie Songs." Learn how 
the tides are made, hear 
tales of whales, seal people 
and other denizens of the 
deep. 

At the same time, a Pa- 
jama Time Storyhour with 
Dottie Moynihan will be 
offered for younger siblings 
accompanied by an adult 
and families with children 
under the age of 5. "Bear 
Tales" is the theme for this 
week, featuring Corduroy 
and other bears. 

The six-week storytellers 
series will continue with 
Guy Peartree July 25, Lau- 
ren Carson Aug. 1, Jennifer 
Smith Aug. 8 and ends with 
Storyteller/Musician Scott 
Kepnes Aug. 15. Pajama 
Time with Dottie Moynihan 
will continue on these eve- 
nings with stories about 
favorite characters such as 
Arthur and the Rainbow 
Fish. 

The programs are spon- 
sored by an LSTA grant 
from the Massachusetts 
Board of Library Conmiis- 
sioners and a Quincy Arts 
Lottery grant from the Mas- 
sachusetts Cultural Council. 
On Monday, July 17 be- 
ginning at 1 p.m., residents 
are invited to call or stop by 
the Adams Shore Branch 
Library (376-1325) to reg- 
ister for the following pro- 
grams. Programs are free, 
with space limited to 
Quincy residents: 

Friday, Aug. 11 at the 
Adams Shore Branch Li- 
brary, Mad Science of 
Greater Boston will present 
two hands-on science work- 
shops of "Slippery Science" 
at 1:30 p.m. for children 
ages 4-6 and at 2:45 p.m. for 




RONA LEVSNTH/UL 



ages 7-10. 

Tuesday, Aug. 22 at 3 
p.m. at the Adams Shore 
Branch Library, Craft Pro- 
gram: Making Seashell 
Keepsake Boxes, Ages 8- 
12. 

Wednesday, Aug. 23 at 
10 a.m. at the Adams Shore 
Branch Library, Craft Pro- 
gram: Making Airplanes. 
Ages 6-8, registration re- 
quired. 

On Monday, July 17 be- 
ginning at 1 p.m., call or 
stop by the Wollaston 
Branch Library, 41 Beale St. 
(tel. 376-1330) to register 
for the following special 
program, which is free, with 
space limited to Quincy 
residents: 

Monday, Aug. 7 at 10 
a.m. at the Wollaston 



Branch Library, Puppeteer 
Deborah Costine presents 
"Shadow Stories for tfie 
Very Young," a puppet 
show featuring favorite 
fairytales. Ages 2-5 accon^r^ 
panied by an adult, registra- 
tion required. 

On Monday, July 17 be- 
ginning at 9 a.m., call or 
stop by the North Quincy 
Brandi Library, 381 Han- 
cock St. (tel. 376^1320) to 
register for the following 
program, which is free, with 
space limited to Quincy 
residents: 

Wednesday, Aug. 16 at 

10 a.m. at the North Quincy 
Branch, Craft Program: 
Creating Collage Puppets. 
Ages 2-5 accompanied by 
an adult. 



David LeCam At Bemazzani 
Summer Reading Program July 19 



The Bernazzani Ele- 
mentary School Summer 
Reading Program presents 
guest speaker and reading 
enthusiast David LeCam 
Wednesday, July 19, from 
10 a.m. to 11 a.m. in the 



Media Center of the school 
at 701 Furnace Brook Park- 
way. 

LeCam will explore the 
joys of summer reading. 

Children in grades 3-5 
are welcome. 



Mayor James Sheets and 
the Quincy Park and Rec- 
reation Board announce that 
the 6th annual season of the 
Arts in the Parks program 
will begin tonight 
(Thursday) at 6:30 p.m. at 
LaBrecque Field in Houghs 
Neck. 

The Arts in the Parks 
show will travel to six dif- 
ferent park locations ~ one 
in each ward - throughout 
the city this summer. All 
shows will begin at 6:30 
p.m. Admission and re- 
freshments at all Arts in the 
Parks events are free. 

"The City of Quincy is 
committed to providing 
families with fun activities 
throughout the year," said 
Sheets. "Now in its sixth 
season, the Arts in the Parks 
program provides a free, 
fun, family-oriented night 
with each of Quincy 's 
neighborhoods. I encourage 
everyone to come down and 
enjoy our show and a nice 
summer evening in the 
park.^ '■'•''■' '*M ini!' 

This year's show will 
feature a new group to 
Quincy: Ilie Dance Force. 
The Dance Force is com- 
prised of four young women 
who conduct a fun, high- 
energy dance sho^ for audi- 
ences of all ages. The Dance 
Force encourages audience 
participation and often in- 
corporates children from the 
audience into their act. 

Joining The Dance Force 
will be comedic juggler Pe- 
ter Panic, who will begin the 
Arts in the Parks program ' 
with a lively show of jug- 
gling and comedy in which 
he will juggle a variety of 
unusual items. 

Peter Panic has per- 
formed in Quincy at First 
Night, the Quincy ArtsFest, 
and the City of Presidents' 
Winter Carnival. He has 
toured the country and the 
world displaying his jug- 
gling skills. 

Following tonight's 
(Thursday's) performance at 



^^^ Zfi- '^■^'^* 




';i^~«-!i«i ■;*;■««:■. 






PETER PANIC will lend his unique juggling Ulents to the 
6th annual season of the Arts in The Parks pro^m which 
travels to six different park k)cations tluvughout the city this 
summer. Peter Panic is on the MB with The Diwee Force, a 
high-energy dance fftnp. The program Is Bpoiisbf«d by the 
Mayor's office and the Quincy Park and Rccreatiott Board. 



LaBrecque Field, the sched- 
ule for the rehiaining Hve 
shows is as follows: 

Tuesday, July 18: Whi- 
ton Park in Quincy Point 

Thursday, July 20: 
Bishop Field in Montclair 

Tuesday, July 25: 
O'Rourke Field in West 
Quincy 

Thursday, July 27: 
Mass. Fields in Wollaston 

Monday, July 31: Wen- 
dall Moses Playground in 
Squantum 

"The Park Department is 
happy to utilize our facilities 
for an event that people of 
all ages can enjoy at the 
same time," said Thomas 
Koch, executive director of 
the Park, Forestry, and 
Cemetery Departments. 
"Our parks can be more 
than just a place for a ball- 
game; they can be the center 
of community and cultural 
activity." 

The Quincy Park and 



Recreation Departments will 
provide an ice cream and 
cold drink for' all those who 
attend the Arts in the Parks 
festivities. 

"The Arts in the Parks 
program offers an opportu- 
nity for families to walk 
down to their neighborhood 
pai^ and enjoy a great show 
of comedy, dance and mu- 
sic," said Barry Welch, di- 
rector of the Quincy Rec- 
reation Department. "Each 
year this program brings fun 
and enjoyment directly to 
the neighborhoQds of 
Quincy." 

Residents are encouraged 
to bring their own blanket or 
lawn chair for seating on the 
lawn. 

For more information on 
the Arts in the Parks pro- 
gram, call the Quincy Park 
Department at (617) 376- 
1254 or the Quincy Recrea- 
tion Department at (617) 
376-1394. 




Irish Band Entertains On 
USS Salem Sunday 



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THE O'REILLYS South Shore Irish Band wiU be featured on the back deck of the USS 
Salem as part of the ship's sammeriong concert series. The concert wiD take place Sunday, 
July 16 at 2 pjn. Admission is $6 for adults and $4 for chlMren and seniors. Admission prke 
iBchidcs a tov of the USS Salem. The ship b h>cated in Quincy Point, off Rte. 3A, near the 
fore River Bridte. For more faifDrmation call (617) 47^.7909. . 




Thursday, July 13, 2000 TIm Qulnosr Sua Page? 



SCCIAL 



Auxiliary Raises $35,000 
For Quincy Medical Center 



Carol Herbai, president 
of the Quincy Medical 
Center Auxiliary, presented 
a check for $35,000 to the 
hospital at the auxiliary's 
annual spring luncheon at 
the Wollaston Golf Club. 

Hospital CEO Christine 
Schuster said the money 
will be used to make needed 
improvements in the Emer- 
gency Department, where 
volume has increased by 30 
per cent of the past few 
years! 

Other planned improve- 
ments include the antici- 
pated opening this month of 
a Veterans Administration 
clinic on site to serve veter- 
ans who now have to travel 

to Boston or Braockton for 
treatmenmt. 

The hospital will also 
welcome Asian physicians 
on July 24 to serve the 
growing Asian community 
in Quincy and a Learning 
Development Clinic offer- 
ing pediatric services. 



Karen Tufts, director of 
volunteers, presented the 
annual Bissett Scholarship 
award of $1,000 to Robert 
Hanna, a Boston College 
High School graduate and 
hospital volunteer, who will 
begin studying at Harvard 
where he will major of 
mathematics. 

His other activities in- 
clude mentoring, math tutor, 
lector at St. Anne's Church 
and choir school from 5th to 
8th grade. 

The following slate of 
auxiliary officers were in- 
stalled for the coming year: 

Carol Herbai, president; 
Caroline Bomstein, first 
vice president; Clarusn 
McKeon, second vice presi- 
dent; llda DiMascio, re- 
cording secretary; Lorraine 
Edwards, corresponding 
secretary; Yolanda Ro- 
manelli, treasurer; Natalie 
Fossati, assistant treasurer. 

Caroline Bomstein was 
chairperson for the lunch- 
eon. Music was provided by 
the Silver Streak Ehio. 




SOUTH SHORE ELDER Services Director of Community 
Services Linda F1tzgii>bon congratulates Quincy resident Sy 
Porter for his 15 years of service as a Meals on Wheels 
driver. 



QUINCY RESIDENT Tom Needham is congratuhited for 
his 15 years as a Meals on Wheels driver by South Shore 
Elder Services Director of Community Services Linda 
Fitzgibbon. 



2 Residents Honored By 
South Shore Elder Services 



Sara Gordon Graduates 
Boston College Magna Cum Laude 

Sara D. po;:don of selmg at Boston College in 

Quincy has graduated magna the fall and has accepted a 

cum laude with a 3.8 aver- teaching fellowship at the 

age from Boston College Campus School., 
with a degree in elementary 

eduoalionsjnd moderate spe- • ^^J^ 'S. the daughter of 

cial needs. • > j< Marty and Paula Gordon and 

the granddaughter of Paul 

She plans to continue on and Dolly Rouleau, all of 

to a master 'o degree in coun- Houghs Neck. 

Mr. And Ml^. Michael Larson 
Parents Of A Daughter 



Michael and Donn?, Lar- 
son of Weymouth are the 
parents of a daughter, Katya 
Caleigh Larson, bom April 
27 at South Shore Hospital 
in South Weymouth. 

Grandparents are Mr. 
And Mrs. Louis Mastroianni 



of Quincy and Evelyn Lar- 
son and the late Carl Larson 
of Randolph. 

Great grandparents are 
Delia Barrett and Peter 
Mastroianni, both of 
Quincy. 



Quincy residents Tom 
Needham and Sy Porter 
were among the 600 volun- 
teers recently feted at South 
Shore Elder Services' 
(SSES) annual volunteer 
recognition luncheon at 
Lantana in Randolph. 

For 15 years, the two 
men have been volunteering 
for the Meals on Wheels 
nutrition program. Because 
of their dedication, ill and 
frail homebound elders are 
able to enjoy nutritious 
meals. For some, it may be 
their only contact with oth- 
ers. 

"It's atrffedible that they 
have been doift^ this for 15 
years. Many people don't 
keep jobs for half that time," 
said Executive Director 
Edward Flynn. "Our volun- 
teers are the foundation of 
many of oiir programs. 

"Last year almost 600 
volunteers gave more than 
61,000 hours of their time 
caring for ill and frail elders 
in our communities. They 
cared for them in a variety 
of ways: delivering Meals 



on Wheels; visiting with 
those who are isolated and 
lonely; driving them to 
medical appointments; 
shopping for their groceries; 
helping them to manage 
their finances. 

"If we had to hire staff to 
provide the same services," 
Flynn said, "it would cost us 
more than $600,000. We 
couldn't begin to do it with- 
out them." 

Flynn said the luncheon, 
paid for by contributions of 
local businesses, is the 
highlight of the year. "It 
gives me and my staff a 
chance to thank the tireless 
volunteers—many of them 
elderly themselves—who 
give so much," he added. 



SESS is a non-profit, 
state home care agency, 
serving Braintree, Cohasset, 
Hingham, Holbrook, Hull, 
Milton, Norwell, Quincy, 
Randolph, Scituate and 
Weymouth. SSES develops, 
delivers, and coordinates 
services that enable elders to 
remain safely in their own 
homes and communities 
with dignity and in comfort. 
SSES also helps older citi- 
zens in improving and 
maintaining the quality of 
their lives. 

SSES was designated an 
Aging Services Access 
Point (ASAP) by the Mas- 
sachusetts Executive Office 
of Elder Affairs in 1997. As 
an ASAP, SSES is one of 27 



agencies throughout the 
state designated to coordi- 
nate state-funded services to 
elders. Services include, but 
are not limited to: home- 
making, personal care as- 
sistance, Meals-on- Wheels, 
money management, care- 
giver support programs, the 
Senior Pharmacy Program, 
congregate housing, protec- 
tive services, and the Elder- 
at-Risk program. 

Call 781-843-3910 for 
information about volunteer 
opportunities. 



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Page 8 Tl&« QulAoy Siut JMinday , July 13, 200^ 



Library Summer Concert 
Series Opens July 20 



Dublin-born folk singer 
and multi-instrumentalist 
Tom O'Carroll opens the 
Thomas Crane Public Li- 
brary's summer concert se- 
ries Thursday, July 20, with 
Irish Music: Songs and Sto- 
ries. 

The hour-long concert 
begins at 12:30 p.m. on the 
front lawn of the main li- 
brary in Ouincy Square. 
O'Carroll wil, present a 
mix of old favorites, unfa- 
miliar tunes and originals. 

Both musician and folk- 
lorist, O'Carroll brings hu- 
mor and wit to his perofr- 
mances. A graduate of Uni- 
versity College, Dublin, he 
has played at concerts, fes- 




TOM O'CARROLL 

tivals, clubs and colleges all 
over the United States and 
Canada as well as Ireland. 
The concerts continute 



for three successive Thurs- 
days with performances by 
jazz vocalist Krisanthi Pap- 
pas July 27, guitarist Mi- 
chael Nix on Aug. 3, and 
music of the Andes with 
INCA SON on Aug. 10. 

Concert goers arc wel- 
come to bring lawn chairs, 
blankets and picnic baskets. 
In case of rain the concerts 
will be held at the Adams 
Shore Branch Library, 519 
Sea St. Both sites are handi- 
capped accessible. 

The concerts are free and 
are funded in part by the 
Quincy Cultural Council, a 
local agency supported by 
the Massachusetts Cultural 
Council. 




Art Association Awards Two Scholarships 

The Quincy Art Asso- Kurpleski, a recent graduate Scholarships are awarded 

ciation has awarded scholar- of North Quincy High to students who intend to 

ships to two local high School; and Nick DiStasi, a attend an art college or any 

school graduates. recent graduate of Quincy college for the study of 

Recipients are Christine High School. some form of art. 




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We're Having a 



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Thursday. July 27, 2000 

6-8pm 



Marina Bay* Quincy 
Traditional Summertime Cool^out 

featuring! **Fat City Band** 

Donation $20 per person 

For Tici(ets and Information, call 617-376-0900 

Checks may be sent to the CTE. Michael W. Morrissey. 
PO Box 21 5. North Quincy. MA 021 71 

Paid forandiulhoriwd by The Comoiittce to RenElfcl Micljafl .W- Morrissey, PO Box 215, North Ouincy, MA 02171 



KEVIN F. COUGHLIN, third from left, was recently inducted into Boston University's 
Collegium of Distinguished Alumni. From the left, daughter Maria, son Matthew, wife 
Domenica and son James. 

Kevin Coughlin Receives 
BU's Highest Honor 



Kevin F. Coughlin, a 
lifelong Quincy resident, 
was recently inducted into 
Boston University's Colle- 
gium of Distinguished 
Alumni, and Graduate 
School of Arts and Sci- 
ences. 

At the award ceremony 
addressed by President Jon 
Westling, Coughlin, a 1976 
BU graduate, was recog- 
nized for his distinguished 
service to his profession and 
society, and his tireless ad- 
vocacy over the last two- 



plus decades on behalf of 

children, youth and families 
in the state. 

Coughlin, the assistant 
chief probation officer at the 
Middlesex Probate and 
Family Court, was a recipi- 
ent of a 1996 Impact Quincy 
Community Hero Award, 
the 1998 Boston Parents 
Paper Family Advocate of 
the Year-Public Friend 
Award, and a 1999 Quincy 
City Council Commenda- 
tion. 

He is a member of the 



Sonshine Pre-School 

OPEN REGISTRATION 
for Boys & Girls 

3 and 4 Year Olds 

Meets Mondays- Fridays 

Mornings or Afternoons 

Call 472-2345 for information 

Or sign up At the Salvation Army 

At the Comer of Elm 

and Baxter Streets, Quincy 



Middlesex Bar Association 
Family Court Bench/Bar 
Committee, the Association 
of Family and Conciliation 
Courts, and the Family 
Court's Committee on Un- 
represented Litigants. 

He is also vice-chairman 
of the Family Coun- 
cil/Mayor's Commission on 
the Family, secretary and 
past president of the 
Montclair/Wollaston 
Neighborhood Association, 
and a member of the Greater 
Quincy Knights of Colum- 
bus, the Quincy Lions Club, 
the Sacred Heart Parish 
Council, and co-chair of the 
Montclair School Parent 
Advisory Council. 

Coughlin lives in Quincy 
with his wife, Domenica, 
and three children, Maria, 
James and Matthew. 



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Elizabeth Griffey, M.D. 

announces new convenient Tuesday evening 
and Saturday summer hours. 

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Quincy College Earns 
Honors From United Way 



Employees at Quincy 
College are helping students 
to achieve their dreams 
through education. 

But their recent support 
of United Way of Massa- 
chusetts Bay demonstrates 
their desire to help children 
and families in the conunu- 
nity achieve their dreams, 
too. 

United Way of Massa- 
chusetts Bay is saluting em- 
ployees of Quincy College 
for raising more than $6,650 
for the organization -- a 
whopping 85% increase 
over funds raised by the 
college last year. To honor 
this generosity, United Way 
of Massachusetts Bay re- 
cently presented its Presi- 
dent's Award to Quincy 
College. 

"Like Quincy College, 
we are 'in the business' of 
offering opportunities," said 
Marian Heard, president and 
chief executive officer of 
United Way of Massachu- 
setts Bay. "We want to em- 
power families in our region 
with the resources they need 
to be self-sufficient, and we 
want to offer all children ~ 



regardless of economics - 
the opportunity to succeed 
in school and beyond. The 
funds raised by Quincy 
College take us a step closer 
to our goals." 

United Way of Massa- 
chusetts Bay centers its an- 
nual investment on commu- 
nity-based human services 
designed to prevent prob- 
lems before they take root. 
Its funds provide critical 
operating support to agen- 
cies providing child care, 
parent support, after-school 
programs, services for im- 
migrants, cancer prevention, 
job training programs, elder 
services, domestic violence 
services, HIV/AIDS, and 
substance abuse, to name a 
few. 

"Every day at Quincy 
College our faculty and staff 
are reminded of the good 
programs and services 
funded by United Way," 
said Sean Barry, interim 
college president. "We 
know that our students, their 
families, or someone we 
know like neighbors or 
friends may benefit from the 
contributions we make." 

Barry said much of the 



success stories of Quincy 
College students include 
direct connections to the 
community-focused and 
health-related organizations 
empowered by the financial 
support of Quincy College 
participants in the United 
Way drive. 

"I'm proud to work with 
so many generous, compas- 
sionate individuals," Barry 
told employees at a recent 
reception for contributors. 
"Every day, in our offices 
and in our classrooms, stu- 
dents' lives are improved 
and dreams are realized. 
Now, in the spirit of this 
community, we are contrib- 
uting to lives beyond our 
campus — investing in 
healthy, happy citizens and 
feeling great about it." 

For more than 65 years, 
the United Way has part- 
nered with local human 
service providers and com- 
munity residents to identify 
community needs and im- 
plement effective solutions. 
The United Way is the larg- 
est non-governmental pro- 
vider of funds for health and 
human services in our 
community. 




QUINCY COLLEGE EMPLOYEES recenUy joined Interim CoUege President Sean Barry 
(third from right, front row) to celebrate raising more than $6,650 for United Way of 
Massachusetts Bay. For their generosity, United Way of Massachusetts Bay presented its 
President's Award to Quincy College. 



Statewide Referral System 
Legislation Moves Ahead 



State Senator Michael 
Morrissey reports that leg- 
islation establishing a state- 
wide information and refer- 
ral system has passed the 
Joint Government Regula- 
tio ns Conmiitte e. 

Morrissey, chairman of 
the Government Regulations 
Committee, said: "This bill 
would basically simplify the 
whole process for obtaining 
information on a variety of 
government services. * 

"If a person has a ques- 
tion, for example, about 
welfare or food stamps, or 
just wants to contact a state 
agency, they no long have to 
find numerous 1-800 num- 
bers. Instead, citizras can 



call 211, and this service 
will connect them to some- 
one who can answer their 
questions." 

The 211 solution was 
first utilized in Atlanta two 
years ago, Morrissey note.. 
Last year Connecticut 
adopted it with success. 

"There are so many state 
agencies that contacting the 
one you are looking for can 
be a daunting, time- 
consuming process," Mor- 
rissey said. "The 211 solu- 
tion simplifies the process 
and saves people time. It's 
just an easier way for people 
to get the information they 
need." 

Within the state there are 
literally thousands of phone 



numbers for social service 
programs, government of- 
fices, community organiza- 
tions, volunteer referral 
centersm donation clearing 
hiuses, education systems 
and neighborhood groups, 
Morrissey noted. 

"The 211 solution puts 
and end to this confusion, 
and makes it easier for a 
citizen to make his or her 
voice heard," he said. 

The J legislation. House 
Bill 5130, and it companion 
bill, Senate 2160, will now 
move to the House Com- 
mittee on Ways and Means 
where the committee will 
review the cost to operate 
the program. 



^ Union Congngationd Churcfi 

May Ik Lord'Bkss you & yimjcamiij 

Vacation Bible School 

July 17-21, 9am-iioon 




Rev. John Carl Swansoft, Pastor 

Comer of Beach Street & Rawson Road, 

Wollaston, MA 02170 • 617-479-6661 



Finally Affordable 



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for 

Self-Employed, Uninsured & Group 




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Call- 
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100,000 people on the South Shore are now benefiting 

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liBel better? You should. Because today, the top physicians from Boston 
Medical Center are available right here at Quincy Medical Center. They're 
heading up our General Surgery Department, Emergency Department and 
Anesthesiology. They include cardiologists recognized for excellence by 



Bringing You the Best 

U.S. News & World Report Throughout the hospital, they include board -certified, 
energetic leaders who will ensure that you will get the very best care possible. 
For an appointment or more information, give us a call (617)376-CARE(2273). 

Quincy Medical Center in a leaching ajfiliale of Boston Univen-ity School of Medicine. 



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I 



Page !• TlM Qulnoj Sun Thunday, July 13, 2Me 




267 On Atlantic Honor Roll 



NORTH QUINCY Hifh School students Nancy Yanlran, SheOa Jafknadeh, and Sarah Wong 
were honored recenUy at Regis College for their top 10 scores statewide on the National 
Spanish Exams. Thousands ofpubNc, private, and parochial school students finom across the 
state and across the country took part hi the exams at various levels of proficiency. 

NQHS Students Among Top 10 In State 
On National Spanish Exams 

at Regis College. 

The national exams are 
proficiency-based tests that 
focus on oral and reading 
comprehension as well as 
vocabulary and grammatical 
accuracy. 

Approximately 100 
NQHS students took the 
exams this past semester. 



North Quincy High 
School students Nancy 
Yankun, Sheila Jafarzadeh, 
and Sarah Wong were rec- 
ognized recently for scoring 

among the top 10 statewide 
in their respective categories 
on the National Spanish 
Exams. 



Wong finished among 
the top 10 for the Level 2 
Test; Yankun and Ja- 
farzadeh, Level 3. 

Massachusetts, which 
recognizes only those in the 
top 10 as State Winners, 
honored the three students 
and others from across the 
state during ceremonies held 



Atlantic Middle School 
lists 267 students on the 
honor roll for the fourth 
term. 
They are: 

HIGH HONORS 
Grade 6: Kelly Barden, 
Stephanie Buscher, Ada 
Chen, Joshua Clancy, Chou 
Diep, Caitlin Kelly, Joseph 
Kyle, Ngan Le, Samantha 
Ly, Brendan Mulcahy, Eric 
Ng, Drusilla Szeto, Quang 
Thanh Ta, Thuy Truong, 
Nhi Vu, Christina Wong, 
Steven Yang, Winnie Zhu. 

Grade 7: Kris Borgen- 
dale, Stanley Chen, Kathy 
Chiang, Marissa Deegan, 
Elvis Ge, Sarah Goreham, 
Jennifer Ha, Thanh-Nha 
Hoang, Alicia Huang, Chel- 
sey Knight, Jola Korea, 
Stephanie Labelle, Christina 
Lam, Cindy Lau, Gordon 
Lau, Kenneth Leung, Jenni- 
fer Li, Michael Lynch, 
Christopher Mercurio, 
Linda Poteau, Michelle 
Schleicher. 

Grade 8: Rita Buscher, 
Millie Chan, Pingting Chen, 
Diane Chin, Betty Chu, 
Gezim Drenova, Nealia 
Giarratani, Monica Ha, 
Monica Huang, William 




Kwok, Kitty Lee, Lena Li, 
Wai Kin Louie, Heidi Luc, 
Athina Markopoulos, Lisa 
Mei, Manna Mei, Matthew 
Moran, K-Li Moy, Lisa 
Ngu, Timothy O'Donnell, 
Damian Scrivano, Sandy 
Shi, Jason Son, Sandra 
Stein, Flora Tang, Vicky 
Tom, Yen Truong, Ly Thuy 
Vicn, Prasert Wiwatyukhan, 
Jason Wong, Mie Chu Ye- 
ung. Bo Cheng 2^ou. 
HONORS 
Grade 6: Kevin Adams, 
Michael Ainsley, Scott An- 
drews, Michael Blathras, 
Joshua Brabazon, Krista 

Bun, Phuong Cao, Liam 
Carey, David Chan, Kevin 
Chan, Weibin Chen, Dan- 
ielle DiSciacca, Victoria 
Donaghue, Mantas Dum- 
cius, Ritu Eunni, Michael 
Ferrara, David Finnegan, 
Keryn Foley, Christopher 
Garvey, Josephine Gior- 
dano, Joseph Howlett, Tony 
Huang, Bi Huang, Amanda 
Joyce, Wai Kwan, Angela 
Kyin, Patrick Kyle, Joey 
Lam, Steven Lam, Matthew 
Law, Xi Lin, Scott Lynch, 
Shaun Lynch, Kayla Martin, 
Charlotte Medina, Caitlyn 
Miller, Deanna Mirabile, 
Martin Morales, Sebastian 
Morales, Holly Mui, Phi 
Tan Nguyen, Heidi Pat- 
schke, Stephanie Pearson, 
Annie PhUfrg, Scott 
Richards, Nancy "Righi, 
Yvonne Saulnier, Alysa 
Shea, Victor Sok, Yvonne 
Tam, Victor Tan, Livia 
Terezi, Benjamin Tubo, 
Armin Vajraca, Daryl Vo, 
Brandon Wheaton, Stepha- 
nie Wong, Yekaterina Ye- 
fremova, Stephen Yovino. 

Grade 7: Hemantb Akki^ 
raju, Valerie Ayer, Kristen 
Berry, Gary Chen, Pingping 
Chen, Ling Qin Chen, 
Christopher Cheu, Gerald 
Chubbuck, John Clark, 
Cailin DriscoU, Michael 
Faherty, Benjamin Fang, 
Katelyn Girard, Vincent 
Grennell, Cindy Huynh, 
Alexander Jorgensen, 
Beatriz Juarez, Shauna 



Give. 



American Heart 
AssodatioiLJ 



# 



WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



Kelly, Vsevolod Khibkin, 
Ryan Kyle, Dickson Lee, 
Edwin Leung, Jessica Li, 
Jennifer Li, Allison Li, Su- 
pei Liao, Jason Lin, Henry 
Lo, Bonnie Ly, Kevin 
Mackey, Stephen Maggio, 
Jamie Medina, Jinfu Mei, 
Paula Morgan, Sean Moy- 
lan, Stephanie Mullaney, 
Cayla Newman, Justin 
Nguyen, Vincent Pastore, 
Egi Plasari, Uijana Poreci, 
Mark Richards, Kathryn 
Roach, Keri, Rogers, De- 
metrios SaSellaris, May 
Quan Sou, Johanna Spring, 
Karen Tang, Jedita Treska, 
Alex Tringale, Michelle 
Tuori, Danny Van, Kaitlin 
Vey, Piya Wiwatyukhan, 
Jennifer Wong, Albert Hue- 
Chun Wong, Sandy Yeung, 
Brianne Young, Julie Zhen, 
Denny Zhou. 

Grade 8: Nicholas An- 
derson, Tatiana Arredond6, 
Elio Asllanaj, Angela At- 
tardo, Mike Au Yeung, 
Richard Ayer, Christine 
Brick, Heather Cesero, Jian 
Xin Chen, Monica Chen, 
Michael Chiu, Li Mun 
Chong, Chi Kit Chung, Ja- 
mie Clifford, Cristina Del- 
gado, Gregory Dinicola, 
Gedeon Endeshaw, Mat- 
thew Eng, Lauryne Flaherty, 
Gemma Galecia, Joanna 
Gervais, Natasja Giordano, 
Elizabeth Gribaudo, Mark 
Hastings, May Ho, Priscilla 
Ho, Hamda Ismail, Jennifer 
Johnson, Dorgthy Jones, 
Toni Jones, Stephanie 
Kowlski, Meghan Lahar, 
Stella Lam, Sam Kwan 
Lam, Dung Lam, Cindy 
Lang, David Law, Dennis ' 
Layden, Jocelyn Li, Karen 
Liang, Kellan Losi, Zin Ma, 
Nancy Martin, Sean 
McCormack, Paul McLean, 
Joseph McManus, Linda 
Mou, Jamie Mulkerrins, 
April Mullaney, Amanda 
Murphy, Katelyn Murphy, 
Brandon Neves, Christopher 
O'Brien, Sara Page, Chris- 
tine Perry, Elizabeth Pierce, 
Joanna Prifti, John Purcell, 
Stephen Reardon, Michele 
Reppucci, Cassie Rombold, 
Christopher Sheehan, 
Timothy Sommers, Karina 
Souza, Shan Shan Tam, 
Chhun Heng Tan, Christo- 
pher Tran, Jenny Tsui, La- 
cey Vachon, Eric Wang, 
Timothy Watson, Brian 
Weeks, Saberine Wehbe, 
Jian Wei Wu, Richard Ying. 




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Thursday. July 13, 2000 Tbe Quinoy Sun Page 11 



,,;i^m»^-^i- 




MAYOR JAMES SHEETS enjoys the TaU Ships Parade of Sail with Michael Bartosiak, 
WoUaston resident and executive assistant. Property Management Department of the city of 
Boston. Bartosiak helped coordinate efforts to let Quincy residents eiyoy the view from Long 
'*'""'*• (Quincy Sun Photo/Robert Noble) 




LONG ISLAND was the place to be Tuesday for one of the best views of the Tall Ships 
Parade of Sail A Quincy section enjoying the view and the day were, seated from left: Susan 
Dcmpsey, Deborah Dallaire, Sharon Traft, Pat Happnie, Stasia Toomey, and Paula 
Bartosiak. Standing fh>m left were: Padre Juan Sullivan, visiting from Argentina; Ellen 
Power, Jack Keams, Dave Toomey, Nancy Reams, and Steven Power. 

(Quincy Sun Photo/Rc^rt Noble) 

Quincy Homestead Open 
But By Appointment Only 



(Cont'd from page 1) 

telephone number — 472- 
5117." 

A Quincy woman who 
visited the house three times 
with friends from New Jer- 
sey earlier in the summer 
told the Sun that the sign 
she saw said only "Enjoy 
the grounds." 

Guild explained that the 
Colonial Dames proprietor- 



ship of the Homestead is "in 
transition." 

"When all is resolved the 
Home will be open for it's 
usual season and we will 
welcome the citizens of 
Quincy and Tourists," she 
said. 

"This is an historic site 
with remarkable beauty and 
interesting history that 
should be shared with the 



public." 

The Sun was unable to 
reach Mrs. Child at her 
home for further informa- 
tion by press time. 

Several calls were also 
made Tuesday to the 472- 
5117 number seeking more 
information regarding ap- 
pointments for tours but 
there was no answer. 





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OLIN TAYLOR takes his oath as the new commander of the Cavanagh DAY chapter. 
Among other ofRcers recently installed shown behind him were Daniel Grear, junior vice 
commander-chaplain; Bernard Schnaper, judge advocate and Joseph Weinberger, fifth 
junior vice commander. 

(Quincy Sun Photo) 

Olin Taylor Installed 
CaYanagh DAV Commander 



Olin Taylor, a World 
War II veteran, was recently 
installed as commander of 
the Cavanagh Chapter, Dis- 
abled American Veterans. 

Taylor was selected as 
The Quincy Sun Citizen of 
the Year in 1996 for his 
dedication and service to 
veterans. 

As commander, Taylor 
succeeds Robert LaFleur 
who becomes senior vice 
commander and treasurer. 



Edward Finn, Depart- 
ment Commander of the 
DAV, was the installing 
officer at ceremonies held at 
the Nickerson Legion Post 
in Squantum. 

Other officers installed 
were: 

Daniel Grear, junior vice 
commander and chaplain; 
Frederick Comis, second 
junior vice commander; 
John Buckley, third junior 
vice commander; Gaetano 



DeGrazia, fourth junior vice 
commander; Joseph Wein- 
berger, fifth Junior vice 
commander. 

Peter Stonis, adjutant and 
secretary; Earl Kuja, alter- 
nate secretary; Bernard 
Schnaper, judge advocate; 
Martin Taglini, Keith Eis- 
enhauer and Norman 
Brown, auditors; Anthony 
Tnibiano, officer of the day 
and James Niland, sergeant 
at-arms. 



QMC Auxiliary Plans 
Clothing, Textile Sale 



The Quincy Medical tion Center. 
Center Auxiliary will spon- The sale will include new 

sor a clothing and textile regular and plus size 

sale by Horizon Imports women's dresses and sports 

Monday, July 17, from 8 clothes, coverlets, spreads 

a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Educa- and throws at discount 



prices. All credit cards will 
by accepted. 

A portion of the proceeds 
will direct;ly beneflt patient 
care. Call 376-5509 for 
more information. 





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lyw^ t ay Btt(AHD 850%. Ate the rtiocluctcry fate e^jiigs, the vanabte 

minut1^%,ArriBltaccr<a9elMe(APR)900%, fTiMTiunri Airuei l yr c ei^ a g e Bate (AW) s 18% Introductory late s » aiWbte to new lines onty. No 
closrig cortsfcatje is based criiee of Ihetwa w ei iii B t rflhericst recent real estate t»b* Id Jetei n»ie9TearTicM^ Koperty kauwce 



< »»>ii 



■ r . r , l .l ^ ^<» « < t « t t f < » t fc ^^fclitr l 



Page 12 T1&* QuiB&oy Sun Thursday, July 13, 2000 




City View Real Estate 
Offering Virtual Tour 



Home Buyers Workshop At 
Fleet Mortgage July 15, 22 



City View Real Estate, 63 
Billings Rd., Quincy, an- 
nounces "Virtual Tour," a 
professional home video tour 
on the Internet, is being of- 
fered on homes listed with 
their firm. 



Joyce Baker, president of ers appreciate this convenient 
the South Shore Board of method of viewing many 



Realtors and a broker with 
CityView Real Estate, said 
the technology is an innova- 
tive and efficient way to mar- 
ket a property. Virtual Tour 



properties in the comfort of 
their home or at the real es- 
tate office. 

"CityView Real Estate 



Quincy Neighborhood tions such as the Mass Hous- 

Housing Services, an ap- ing Finance Agency, Soft 

proved First Time Second Programs, down pay- 

Homebuyer Counseling ment and closing cost grants 



to find out you or someone 
you know can buy a home 
with a little or no money 
down. 



Agency, will hold an accred- and other special first time The agenda will be com- 

ited and MH FA certified First homebuyer financing op- prehensive and individual- 
Time Homebuyer's Work- tions. ized. The focus will be on the 



'Virtual Tour" uniquely invites potential buyers into sive real estate firm offering 



has proven to be a progres- ^hop in collaboration with Neighborhood Housing many changing aspects of 



showcases properties. The a home for a personal view 

interior and exterior features ing without actually having 

of a property are highlighted to visit the property, 
thus providing visual infor- Baker said sellers appre- 

mation about the property ciate the fact that a tour of 

which surpasses any written their home is now available 

description. to a large audience and buy- 

Conway Honors Top Producers For April, May 

Jack Conway & Co. re- cently honored the agents in 



sellers and buyers excep- 
tional service in an ever 
changing real estate market," 
Baker added. 

For more information, call 
617-773-5588. Website 
cityviewrealestate.com. 



ERA 
CENTRAL 

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Call Tom McForiand 

For All Your 
Real Estate Answers 

QUINa 328-3200 



Grace Eng HELP WANTED Carol Cahill 



Lynne Houghton, Manager 

I NEED HELP! 

I CALL FOR AN INTERVIEW 

We need listings... 
Give one ofus a call! 

Conway 

^ REALTOR*' 



JACK CONWAY 
COMPANY, INC.™ 

Free Market Analysis 

253 Beale Street, Quincy 
617-479-1500 

www.jackconway.com 



Sandra Fennelly Beverly Joyce Ernie Light 



each sales office who ex- 
celled in listing and selling 
homes during the months of 
April and May. 

In the Quincy office, 
Carolyn Flaherty and Grace 
Eng were the top sellers, 
while Melissa Higgins and 
Flaherty were the top listers 
during that period. 

"Our agents are the back- 
bone of our company, and 
we are very pleased to recog- 
nize their achievements," 
said company President Ri- 
chard F. Cahill. 



Fleet Mortgage on Saturday Services is a non-profit orga- homebuying, including how 

July 15 and 22. nization dedicated to assist- to locate a property within 

The workshop will be held ing first time buyers through budget, how to make an of- 

at The Fleet Bank, 1400 the homebuying process. The fer, and determining the best 

Hancock St., Quincy Center, staff at NHS is unique in their mortgage program, 

from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. approach to obtaining down Advanced registration is 

Attendance at both work- payment and closing costs required and space is lim- 
shops is mandatory to receive assistance as well as rehab ited. A $10 refundable regis- 
your homebuying certificate grantsfortheirclients, which tration is required, 
which is mandatory by all are available throughout the Contact Debbie Kidd at 
lenders to qualify for the entire South Shore area. (61 7) 770-2227 for more in- 
many different mortgage op- Don't miss this opportunity formation. 

Summer Energy Conservation Tips 

Now that the summer sea- 
son has arrived, the NSTAR 
companies (Boston Edison, 
Commonwealth Electric, 
Commonwealth Gas, Cam- 



* Close shades or drapes 
to keep out direct sunlight. 

* Use a clothesl ine instead 
of a dryer. 

* Minimize the number of 



(Mtm 

STAMOS & STAMOS 

747 East Squantum Street, 
Squantum, MA 02171 

fe] (617) 328-9400 ^ 



times of extreme or pro- 
longed heat. 

NSTAR has prepared the 
following checklist of energy 
saving steps to help residents 

bridge Electric) remind resi- stay cool while being more times you open the refrigera- 

dents of the importance of efficient in their energy use: tor door, 

energy conservation. • Use window or ceiling • For cooking, use small 

Conserving energy will fans instead of air condition- appliances like a toaster oven 

lower electric bills and help ers. or electric skillet. On aver- 

the environment. This is es- • If using an air condi- age, they use about half the 

pecially important during tioner, keep the filter clean energy of a full size oven. 

and adjust the setting so the • Cook outdoors if you 

room temperature is no lower can, or use a microwave to 

than 78 degrees. avoid heating up the kitchen. 

•Turn off window aircon- Microwavesuse less than half 

ditioners when you leave the the power of a conventional 

room for several hours, oven and cook in about one- 

You'll use less energy cool- fourth the time, 

ing the room down later than • Keep lights low or off — 

if you leave the unit running, electric lights generate heat. 



A GREAT COMPANY TO DO BUSINESS WITH 



-CENTURY 21 

ANNEX REALTY, INC. 

49 BEALE STREET, QUINCY, MA 
472-430 1-800-345-4614 

Across from Blockbuster & Quincy T 



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QUINCY 

Eatertaia bmily and frieads easily in tiiis goiigeoiM 7 room 
garrison. Located Just steps to tiie iMy in Bcechwood 
Knoll, the proud owners have maintained it in prime 
condition. Some of the fabulous features include a party 
sized family room, private flagstone patio and attached 
garage. Call and see. $349,000 



OnluK 



21 



Century 21 sells a house every minute. 

When you're #1 you can do things others can't 

See all our listings at: www.c21annex.com 



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Real Estate ABC's from 


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Please call Bill Riddle 


mJTak 


617-472-8181 


or visit www.Afinehome.com 



List Your Residential 

& Commercial 

Properties with 

COLLEEN RUSSO 

Realtor/Broker 




Full-Time Professional 
Real Estate Services 

MobiUVoke Mail (617) 842-8065 

Office (617) 32S-3200 
Web site: Colleenrusso.mUtor.com 
Your home listed 







on the internet! _^ . 



REALTY PROS 



FUVIN & FUVIN 

Real Estate 




Your Teacher, 

Friend & Neighbor 

Call 

STEVE FISHMAN 

For All Your 
Real Estate Needs! 

617-479-1000 




Thursday, July 13, 2000 Tlie Quincy Sun Page 13 



ourse for These Great Properties 



South Stum Homes & Investmont Ppopopties 



Weymouth - 
Looking for a money maker? 
4-family home within walking 
distance to the T. $289,900 




Weymouth -• 

2-tamily in a great location, neeJint 
a little TLC, hut worth the invest- 
ment! $194,000 




Quincy ' 

Live in a condo that feels like a 
home! Town house style, 4 rooms, 2 
bedrooms, eat-in kitchen, 1 1/2 
baths, private deck, separate 
entrance garage, low fees, small 
animals accepted. $179,000 




Quincy ' 

2-family home, great income 
property, newer windows and 
furnace. $289,900 



Call 617-479-9000 

For More Information 

Office, Retail & Flex Space 




Weymouth - 

Single family home with 2 bed- 
rooms, hardwood floors, kitchen 
with sliders onto deck that over- 
looks the lake, 1-car garage under. 
$179,900 







^"f r 










Outstanding Weymouth 

Location 

• Approx. 20,000 sf of space 

• Former nursing home facility 
located on a 29,370 sf site 

• Directly across from South Shore 
Hospital 

• Easy access to expressways 

• Ample parking 

• Call for lease terms 



Office/Warehouse Facility 

• 2 1 ,536 sf gross building area 

• Combined lot size over 49,000 sf 

• Single story building with 
basement features office/ 
warehouse space 

• Security fencing 

• Call for lease terms 




GREiir RETU. LOC/mON, 
QUNOKMAl 








OFHCE/VKABmUSE BUUNN6 

IINCY, lA 



Design Your Own Space in this New Quincy Development 

• Up to 19,000 sciiiare feet of new Class A Ixiild-to-suit i>tfice/retail space for lease 

• OiitstiiiK!in>; trafVic uuinLs... \\A hr. traffic flow in excess of 2,000 vehicles 

• Established retail luighKuhood features several maJDr retailers, 
including Walin;irt, RtKhe Brothers, Biadlees and Walgrcens 

• Gmvenicnt access by car or public transjxirtation, ample piirking available 




Join the Booming 
South Shore Market 

• Approx. 9,500 sq. ft. of space 
for sale, comprised of a 2,700+ 
sq. ft. office area and a 6,800 sq. 
ft. warehouse, featuring 2 over- 
head doors and an office area 

• Highly visible location minutes from 
highways and MBTA station 

• 10,000 sq. ft. on-site parking area 

Great High Visibility 

Location 

• 3,000 sf showroom/retail space 

• Open floorplan; many windows 

• 3,000 sf basement for storage 

• Ample parking 

• Shopping plaza entrance 

• Business B Zoned 
•Offered at only $399,000. 



Attractive Office/ 
Warehouse Building 

• Two-story facility 

• Approximately 2,450 sf of 
office space; t)ulstanding 
upkeep 

• 1,250 sf attached warehouse 

• Easily accessible loc.ition 
close to highway 

mmmmwiKSllKlflll^ * ^ <""King availahle 




Daniel J. 

nn & Co., Inc. 

Visit These & Other Great Listings at www.djflynn.com 



Commercial Sales & Leasing • Residential Home Sales 

Real Estate Auctions • Property Management 

32 Chestnut Street • Quincy • MA • 02169 

Tel. 617.479.9000 • Fax 617.770.0443 



«tt4l«*«»tt 



PmgtU Tift* Qt&lnoy S«u& Thursday, July 13, 2000 



Having A Happy Fourth 



iiaKH 4 '.'2 .t Wkr'MS^i' <i£>i!3!: 







CHRISTOPHER WALLACE, age 2, has his bike all decked 
out for the Ward 2 Association's July 4th Field Day. 



BRIANNA ROY, age 2 1/2, shows her patriotism at the 
Ward 2 Association's July 4th Field Day at the Fore River 
Clubhouse. (Quincy Sun Photos/Tom Gorman) 



VANESSA TRIFONE, age 2, pushes her decorated doll 
carriage in a contest during July 4th celebrations at the Fore 
River Clubhouse. 





MELISSA MCKENNA (center) selected as Miss Merrymount at the Merrymount 
Association's Fourth of July celebration, with her court Jane Fitzgerald (left) and Mary 
Kane. (Quincy Sun Photo) 



GRAND MARSHAL Judie Levering McGrath rides in the Squantum Association 
Fourth of July Parade. Driver is Marcia McCarthy. 

(Quincy Sun Photo) 




r r 

A TRIBUTE TO Charies Schulz, late creator of the popular Peanuts cartoon, was the 
third |riacc float winner \n the Squantum Association Fourth of July parade. 

(Quincy Sun Photo) 




A MEMBER OF the Mickey Mouse Club, Emnu Denelsbeck gets a ride cou-tesy of her 
uncle Jonathan Hays at the Merrymount Association Fourth of July celebration. 

(Quincy Sun Photo) 



Germantown, Houghs Neck Cub Scouts Hold Pinewood Derby 



Cub Scout Pack 6 
Houghs Neck and Cub 
Scout Pack 26 Germantown 
held a joint meeting recently 
at the Houghs Neck Con- 
gregational Church and 
brought their Pinewood 
Derby Cars for a day of 
r^:ing. 



Pack 26 Committee 
Chairman and Ward 1 City 
Councillor Gregory Hanley 
provided a trophy to be 
awarded to the winning 
Pack, which this year was 
Pack 6. 

Organizers expect the 
joint Pinewood Derby Race 



to become an annual event 
with the winner displaying 
the trophy at its charter or- 
ganization over the course 
of the year. 

After the races scouts 
and their families enjoyed 
building and eating ice 
cream sundaes. 



Scouts wiDning awards 
included: Wolf Scout Nick 
Bourgeois, 1st place; Tiger 
Scout Arthur Wahlberg, 2nd 
place; Wolf Scout Brandon 
Dean, 3rd place; Scout 
Brian Shields, best looking 
car; Scout Frank Pine, most 
original car; and Scout John 



Jones, Avis "we try harder" 
award. 

Other scouts partici- 
pating were: George 
Oakes, Sean Carey, Steven 
Kubit, John Hanley, Josh 
Wallace, Edward Grennon, 
Paul Miranda, Rahmy El- 



toury, Patrick Dean, Matt 
Shaw, Joseph Grennon, 
Kevin Williams, Paul Red- 
dington, Dennis Carey, 

Adam Squatrito, Andrew 
Shields, Shawn Evju, and 
Ronnie Bercionne. 




Thursday, July 13, 2000 TIm < 



THE NICKERSON LEGION Port color guard leads the Squantum Fourth of July 



parade. 



(Quincy Sun Photo) 




FIRST PLACE HONORS in the Squantum Association parade float category was the 
Star of the Sea Children's Choir and friends "Through the Years" entry. 

(Quincy Sun Photo) 




ANDREA REARDON tosses an egg during 4th of July festivities at Baker Beach. 




SARAH NOE pitches an egg during the egg toss competition at Baker Beach during the 
annual 4th of July FieW Day in Germantown. (Quincy Sun Photos/Tom Gorman) 




IT'S NOT EXACTLY a limousine but costumed participants Stephen George, 9 months, 
and Cullen Walsh, 15 months, seemed to eiyoy the ride in the Squantum Fourth of July 
parade. 

(Quincy Sun Photo) 




A SMART DOG decides to cool off at Baker Beach to the amusement of children during the 
annual 4th of July Field Day in Germantown. 




liffl^^^l 


WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR UFE 

American Heart fn 
AssodadoD.^^ 


Smoking. 



^^^ 



Beechwood 

Lyw Ine (/Sou 

440 East Squantum St. 

Quincy, MA 02171 

(617) 471-5712 



YOUR CHILD DESERVES THE BEST! 

BEECHWOOD'S CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER 

The Most Exciting Early Childhood Program Available! 
PRESCHOOL..CHILDCARE...KINDERGARTEN... SCHOOL-AGED 

• Low Teacher/Child Ratio 

• Professionally IVained Teachers • Caring Family Environment 

• Unique Site Near . . . Beach . . . Bay . . . Marina . . . Hummock 

• Exceptional Playground, Gymnasium, Playfield and Classrooms 



WIDE RANGE OF PART DAY/FULL DAY 
CHOICES AND OPPORTUNITIES 



Age-Appropriate Curricula with Enrichments 

Arts & Crafts, Nature Exploration, New Outdoor Classroom, 

Music, Computers and More! 

Private Music Lessons & T\itoring Year Round 

CALL FOR PRIVATE FAMILY TOUR 617-471-5712 
Accredited By NAEYC (National Association for the Education of Young Children) 




Page 16 Tb« Qulney Sun Thunday, July 13, 2M0 




QUINCY INTERFAITH Sheltering Coalition and Quincy Neighborhood Housing Services 
have new offices located at 1200 Hancock St. Commemorating the event were, from left: Julie 
Connelly, vice president of Community Investment, Citizens Bank; Theresa Bellotti of 
Citizens and board member, Father BilPs Place; Fr. U^llliam McCarthy, founder, Father 
Bill's Place; and Scott Byrnes, vice president. Citizens Bank. 

(Presidential Camera Photo/John Black) 



CELEBRATING the opening of the new offices of Quincy Neighborhood Housing Services 
and Quincy Interfaith Sheltering CoaUtion (Father BiU's Place) at 1200 Hancock St, (Lower 
Level, Citizens Bank) are: John Yazwinski, executive director. Father Bill's Place; Don 
Murray, vice president, Board of Directors, Father Bill's Plate; Rev. Adolph WIsmar, 
president, board of directors, Father Bill's Place; Fr. William McCarthy, founder. Father 
Bill's Place; Julie Connelly, vice president of Community Investment, Citizens Bank; Richard 
Peterson, vice president, QNHS; George Murphy, president, QNHS; David Kilnapp of 
Citizens Bank and board member, QNHS; Eileen Lessard, regional manager, Citizens Bank; 
Theresa Bellotti of Citizens Bank and board member. Father BiU's Place;^John Keenan, 
executive secretary to Mayor James Sheets; and Nonnand Grenier, executive director, 
QNHS. (Presidential Camera Photo/John Black) 



8 Residents On Thayer Middle Honor Roll 



Eight Quincy residents at 
Thayer Academy Middle 
School are on the honor roll 
for the third trimester. 



They are: 
Grade 6: 



Brianna A. 



Casciello, high achievement 
and high effort; and James 
S. Neely, high achievement 
and high effort. 

Grade 7: Elizabeth A. 
Gordan, effort; Patrick P. 
Maloney, effort; Jacquelyn 



Phillips, achievement and 
effort; and James T, Shee- 
han, achievement and e^ort. 
Grade 8: Ryan S. Feld- 
hoff, effort; and Areti A. 
Sakellaris, achievement and 
effort. 



Jill Lee Williams American School For Deaf Graduate 

Jill Lee Williams of for *e Deaf, West Hartford, ingham Award designed to 
Qumcy recent y gra uate ^- ^^^ ^^^.^^ Awards assist students entering col- 

from the American School Ceremony, she won a Cun- ^^8^ °^ ^^^ ^ork force. 



IT'S ■ 
PORTRAIT DAY! 

WITH COUPON 



I 



PORTRAITS 
FOR ONLY 

$1995 

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Includes One 8x10 • NO SITTING FEE 

EVERY SATURDAY 
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Hfi/i/*'*^' Appointments are limited. 

PRESIDENTIAL CAMERA & STUDIOS 

1422 Hancock Street 

Quincy Center 
617'471-1437 Sun. Portraits by appt. I 





HOURS: 
Fri. 9-7:30, 
Sat. 9-4 'Sun. 12^ 



Established 
in 1960 

20 years under 
same ownership 



DAILY LUNCHEON SPECIALS 

Starting at ^4^^ 

1 1 :30am-3:00pm, Tuesday - Saturday 

Famous for Home Cooking 
Generous Portions 
Reasonable Prices 

fVfcwfSMy THROwtf Si/s/OAy Mtstm 
75 ^nmklm Street. Quincy. MA 02169 • TeL 412-W5 





Will Be Closed Saturdays 
During July and August. 

Have A Nice, Safe Summer. 



Beechwood Harbor Cruise 
Slated For August 2 



Beechwood's Annual 
Harbor Cruise, scheduled 
for August 2, will benefit 
the center's expanding in- with music, complimentary 
tergenerational programs, foods, and a wonderful 



the same community re- bar. Passengers will board at 
sponse this summer. Ours is the Marina Bay dock at 6:30 
a three-hour harbor cruise p.m. The ship departs at 7 



reports Don Uvanitte, presi 
dent of Beechwood Com- 
munity Life Center. 

"This harbor cruise has 
become a very popular 
event," stated Sharron 
Reals, executive director of 
the center. "Last year tickets 



crowd each year." 

Another successful "sail" 
will ensure the center's ex- 
pansion of programming, 
said Beals. 

The three-hour, mid- 



p.m. 

Cost is $35 per person 
and $50 per couple. 

Tickets can be purchased 
at the center, from members 
of Beechwood's Develop- 
ment Committee, and other 
sites throughout the city. 

For more information. 



week moonlight cruise fea 

tures DJ, complimentary call Beechwood on the Bay 

sold our early and we expect food, dancing, and a cash at (617) 471-5712. 

Former Quincy Girl to Attend 
Young Tech Leaders Summit 



Mary Curran of Brain- 
tree, a former Quincy girl, 
has been selected to join 
1,000 intensely motivated 



high school students at the 
first ever "NexTech," the 
National Summit of Young 
Technology Leaders. 



Central Baptist Church 

65 Washington St., Quincy 

invites all children to join us at 

SONZONE DISCOVERY CENTER 

VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL 

beginning Monday, July 24th to Friday, 

Juty 28th from 6pm to 8pm 

This year's Vacation Bible School promises to 

be an adventure your children will never forget. 

For information, call 617-479-6512 




The summit will take 
place in Austin, Texas; from 
July 16 to July 26 and is 
designed to introduce ex- 
ceptional high school stu- 
dents to careers in the rap- 
idly exploding field of tech- 
nology. 

"The NexTech Summit 
will provide a superb edu- 
cational experience for 
those like Mary Curran who 
are interested in pursuing a , 
career in technology," said 
Mike Lasday, president of 
Envision EMI, a Washing- 
ton-based education, man- 
agement and marketing 
company that sponsors 
NexTech. 



by George P. Murphy 



As heard on WJDA Radio, 1300 AM every Thursday at 11:00am! 

CAR RENTALS - nLL 'ER UP OR NOT? 

When renting a car, paying for and driving, flying or cruising, you can 

gas is your responsibility. The stan- always count on us for honest, reliable, 

dard approach is to accept a full tank first class travel services. And at 

at pick-up, then return the car with PRIME TRAVEL, our number 1 goal 

a full tank. You can bring it back is to provide you with professional, 

without refueling and allow the personal, experienced attention to your 

rental company to fill it and charge every tr.Tvel need. Many times we can 

you for the gas. This is an expen mually save you money because of our 

sive option, as rental companies access to special disconras, packages, 

charge a higher price than the going etc. Time to travel? Time to call 617- 

market rate in the area. You may also 472-3697, 500 Victory Road, Marina 

buy gas at pick-up, paying a posted Bay. 

price per gallon that is supposedly P.S..- Consider how much you'll 

at or below the area's gas prices. You drive and how hur- 

then return the car and receive no ried you 'II be at 

credit for what remains in the tank, drop-off time when 

The cost-effective move here is to deciding your fueling 

return the car as empty as possible, options. 

Whether you are renting a car 




Travel 
Services 



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SAVESiiwiiH TNT VACATIONS} 

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Selected dates. All spoce subject to avoi lability. 
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617-472-3697 or 800-792-5208 




WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



14BEALEST 773-4g00 



WED&THURS JULY 12 & 13 

Tom Crmse - V/ng Rhames 

MISSION IMPOSSIBLE (PG-13) 

Suspertse - Action 
EVE'S 7:00 ONLY 



STARTS FRI JULY 14 

Brechin Meyer - Sean Scotl 

ROAD TRIP (R) 

Adult Comedy 

FRI & SAT 7:00 & 9:15 

SUN-THURS 7.00 ONLY 



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Thursday, July 13, 2000 Tli« Qulnoy Sun Page 17 



Spccts 




KELSEY KEENER raises her trophy as the overall winner in 
the recent Squantum Road Race girls' division. 

(Quincy Sun Photos/Joseph Curran) 



THE KILEY FAMILY was well represented at the recent 
annual Squantum Road Race. Bill Kiley (11) with Andrew 
Kiley on his shoulder, Bill Kiley, Jr. (12) and Evelyn Kiley (28) 
are joined by Willie O'Neill. 



J.J. DOWNS, accompanied by his parents, holds his first-place 
trophy in the boys' division of the annual Squantum Road Race. 



Morrisette Rides Doherty's Arm Into Playoffs 



By CHRIS POISSON 

In a game where his team- 
mates' bats were dormant, 
Keith Doherty made more 
noise for the Morrisette 
American Legion baseball 
team Monday night than 
Sammy Sosa's home-run 
rampage in Atlanta. 

Doherty (4-1) turned in 
his finest performance of the 
season, tossing eight score- 
less innings as Morrisette 
(13-5), which had just three 
hits, squeezed out a 1 -0 win 
over Canton in extra innings 
at Adams Field. The left- 
hander baffled Canton hit- 
ters all game, allowing only 
three hits and two walks while 
fanning 12. 

"Keith Doherty has turned 
into a great pitcher," said 
manager Ray Cattaneo. "The 
last few games he has pitched, 
he has been outstanding. He' s 
the best pitcher in the league 
right now." 

The victory, Morrisette' s 
fifth straight, locked up sec- 
ond place in the District 6 
East Division. Morrisette still 
had a chance to grab the top 
spot as thic paper went to press 
Tuesday. If it wins its last 
two games — West Roxbury 
(Tuesday) and Milton 
(Wednesday) — and 
Weymouth (14-4) loses its 
last two, it will win the divi- 
sion. 

Canton made two errors 
in the eighth that led to the 
winning run. John Gavin 
reached on an error and 
moved to second on Pat 
Bregoli ' s sacrifice bunt. With 
two outs, Adam Goodrich hit 
a grounder to the third 
baseman, who tried to tag 
Gavin heading to third but 
missed and then threw wildly 
to first, allowing Gavin to 
head home. 

Earlier in the evening, 



Morrisette held on for a 4-3 
win against Randolph in 
game that began June 1 9 but 
was suspended when the 
lights went out at Adams 
Field. At the time, Randolph 
trailed Morrisette, 2-1, and 
had two men on with one out 
in the top of the third inning. 

On Monday, Randolph 
tied il at 2 when the runner on 
third stole home. Morrisette 
regained the lead in the bot- 
tom half on Doherty's sacri- 
fice fiy that scored T.J. Bell 
(single). In the fourth, Joe 
Duffy scored from third on a 
wild pilch to make it 4-2. 
Randolph made it 4-3 with a 
run in the sixth. 

Rob Celata (4-1) earned 
the win, yielding three runs 
on three hits while striking 
out 1 1 in seven innings. He 
also had two hits, along with 
Goodrich, Bell and Chris 
Doherty. 

"Those were two big wins 
for us," Cattaneo said. "It's 
good to get on a hot streak 
now and hopefully it will be 
that way right into the tour- 
nament." 

Tomorrow (Friday), 
Morrisette starts postseason 
play at home in a best-of- 
three series. If necessary, 
Sunday's game will also be 
at Adams Field. Last night 
(Wednesday) it found out 
who its opponent will be. 

In previous action, 
Morrisette thrashed 



Randolph, 11-1, thanks to a 
seven-run sixth inning as it 
sent 1 1 men to the plate. Brian 
O'Hanley led the 17-hit as- 
sault, going 4 for 5 with three 
RBI, and Chris Doherty 
added two hits and two RBI. 

Goodrich (3 for 5), Flynn 
(2 for 4), Gavin (2 for 4), 
Bregoli (1 for 4) and Joe 
Thorley ( 1 for 3) all drove in 
a run. Tommy Hughes added 
two hits. 

Bell (1-2) picked up his 
first win of the season as he 
went the distance, allowing 
one run on three hits with one 
walk and four strikeouts. 

Last Thursday, Celata 
tossed a gem as he dismantled 
rival Quincy, 5-0, at Adams 
Field. Celata allowed six hits 
and walked one as he 
punched out a dozen in the 
complete-game effort. He 
also did some damage at the 
plate, going 2 for 3 with an 
RBI. 

Quincy' s Brian Deptula 
was equally as impressive, 
fanning 14 in seven innings 
of work. He gave up four 
runs on six hits and three 
walks. 

Keith Doherty stroked a 
two-out, two-run double in a 
three-run fourth inning that 
gave Morrisette a comfort- 
able cushion. Goodrich had 
an RBI double, while Gavin 
(double) and Bell (single) 
each contributed with a hit. 

Last Wednesday, 



Morrisette exploded for 
seven runs on seven hits in 
the seventh inning to escape 
with a 1 4-7 win over Canton 
at Stoughton, snapping a 
three-game losing streak. 
Matt McCann (4-1, 2 



saves) allowed seven un- 
earned runs in the complete- 
game effort. He gave up seven 
hits and walked three while 
striking out three. 

Duffy and Gavin each 
banged out three hits and had 



two RBI . Chris Doherty, Bell 
and Thorley all drove in two 
runs. Bregoli and Goodrich 
each had two hits and an RBI. 
Keith Doherty walked three 
times and knocked in a run 
with a sacrifice fly. 



ROUND BALL 
NOOP CANP 

FOR BOYS & 6IRLS 

INSTRUCTION AND CiANCS 

JULY dl-AUCUST 4 ACiCS 6-11 

AUCiUST 1-11 ACiS 12-16 

FOR BROCHURE CALL 

TED STEVENSON 626-6409 

STATK eBRTiritD 




American 
Red Cross 

We'll be there. 

15^^ Annual 
Golf Classic 

MondoY, July ^4, ^000, Ipm 
South Shore Country Club 

Hinghaitt, JHossacAuseffs 
— SCHEDUU or svEurs 



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Pajie 18 The Quincy Sun 



Thursday, July 13, 2000 



Granite Bow To Cowboys; 
Eye Rebound At Hyannis 



Triple A Baseball Playoffs 



By CHRIS POISSON 

Mike Thomas, who joined 
the Quincy Granite two days 
before the season opener 
against the Boston Cowboys 
Saturday night at Veterans 
Memorial Stadium, hardly 
had time to learn his team- 
mates' names, let alone the 
plays. 

But when backup quar- 
terback J.R. Rendle went 
down midway through the 
first quarter, the third-stringer 
found himself on the field 
trying to orchestrate a come- 
back win. 

Rendle, who started in 
place of Liam Higgins (head 
injury), broke his collar bone 
and will be out for the sea- 
son, leaving Thomas as the 
signal caller until Higgins 
returns in a couple of weeks. 

Although the Granite (0- 
1 ) suffered a 20-8 loss to the 
Cowboys, Thomas showed 
flashes of what he can bring 
to this team, provided he 
doesn't leave the City of 
Presidents for a pro camp 
this summer. 

Thomas played college 
ball at the University of North 
Carolina (1991-95) and as a 
senior he passed for 2,436 
yards, the most in a single 
season in school history. So 
Quincy has acapable QB who 
just needs to familiarize him- 
self with the offense. 

"He' s a good player," said 



coach Ken McPhee. "He's 
not used to our offense right 
now, but he'll get used to it. 
He did a pretty good job for 
only being around for two or 
three days. I think he'll be all 
right." 

Quincy will try to rebound 
when it hits the road Satur- 
day to take on the Hyannis 
Hurricanes. 

After a scoreless first 
quarter, Boston got on the 
board in the second when 
wide out Bunny Jefferson, 
who led the team in receiv- 
ing last season with 14 
catches for 383 yards and 
five touchdowns, hauled in a 
74-yard TD pass, breaking 
several tackles along the way. 
Boston converted the two- 
point conversion for an 8-0 
lead. 

Late in the half, Felipe 
Ogaldez picked off a Cow- 
boys' pass to give Quincy 
great field position at the 
Cowboys' 11. On fourth 
down, with less than two 
minutes left, Thomas kept the 
ball and scampered into the 
end zone from nine yards out, 
faking out several defenders 
along the way. He hit Bill 
MacDougall for the two- 
point conversion to tie it at 8. 

In the third, Boston 
blocked a Quincy punt and 
on the ensuing play, wide out 
Chris Walker beat his de- 
fender for a 45-yard TD 



catch, putting his team ahead, 
14-8. The two-point conver- 
sion failed. 

"That hurt us," McPhee 
said. "I thought our defense 
played well. We made a 
couple of mistakes. Big plays 
hurt us. But that' s gunna hap- 
pen. We have to cut down on 
big plays." 

The Granite put together 
a drive at the end of the third 
that carried over to the fourth, 
but it ended when Thomas's 
pass bounced out of a 
receiver' s hands and into Bill 
Wright's, who returned it 80 
yards the other way for a 20- 
8 lead. Boston missed the 
two-point conversion. 

"I don't think I coached a 
particularly great offensive 
game today," McPhee said. 
"We had no continuity. I just 
didn't like it. We kind of 
scrambled with a new quar- 
terback and tried to protect 
him rather than just let him 
play. That's what we have to 
do more — just let him play." 

"We showed some of our 
weaknesses," he added. "We 
have some work to do. I 
thought we did a pretty good 
job in the first half. In the 
second half, we just didn't 
execute. We'll be all right. 
We have to lick our wounds 
and get back to practice. I'll 
watch the film tonight and 
see what we have to do." 



In a battle of Division 
Champions, Yellow Cab 
scored three runs in the bot- 
tom of the sixth inning to 
edge Century 2 1 , 9-8, in re- 
cent Triple A playoff action 
at Mitchell Field. 

Matty Clifford stroked a 
two-run double and scored 
the winning run on a wild 
pitch. Rob Mann, Mike 
Saville and Brennan Carey 
each had two RBI, while 
Andrew Gormley had three 
putouts and three assists play- 
ing second base. Justin Boyd 
came on in relief to gain the 
victory. 

For Century 21, Jim 
Bleier, John Murray and 
Danny Poggi all hit safely. 

Yellow Cab— 4 

Spillane & Epstein — 3 

Joe Ceurvals pitched a 



two-hit complete-game gem 
to lead Yellow Cab to a come- 
from-behihd 4-3 win. He 
fanned 14 and only allowed 
singles to Jimmy MuUaney 
and Matt Young. Training 2- 
1. -Yellow Cab grabbed the 
lead in the bottom of the fifth 
inning by scoring three runs 
on consecutive singles by 
Mark Pepjonovich, Justin 
Boyd, Ceurvals, a walk to 
Mike Ainsley and singles by 
Mike Saville and Rob Mann. 

For Spillane & Epstein, 
Ryan Donovan pitched a 
great game, going the dis- 
tance and striking out a 
dozen. 

Century 21 — 16 

CNA — 

John Murray struck out 
1 4 as he shut down CNA. He 
also had a good day at the 



plate with a double and a 
single. The offense was pow- 
ered by home runs from Dan 
Poggi, David Cordeiro and 
Glenn Peterson. Also con- 
tributing were Gary Uvanitte 
(2 hits, 2 runs), Brendan 
Foley (2-run double), Bobby 
Harrington (2 triples, 2 
singles), John Benoit (hit, 
run, strong game at first) and 
Miah Foley who played solid 
behind the plate. Justin 
Famham took two for the 
team when he was hit by two 
pitches. 

For CNA, Harman Losi 
had a hit and played well at 
shortstop. Ricky Likas ripped 
a double and played a solid 
game at third. Shawn 
McBrien gave a valiant and 
gritty pitching performance. 



Red Cross Golf Classic July 24 
At South Shore Country Club 



Lipton Cup Regatta Starts Friday 



The 14th annual Lipton 
Cup Regatta will be held to- 
morrow (Friday) to Sunday 
at the Squantum Yacht Club 
in Quincy. 

The festivities will begin 
with registration tomorrow 
• from 7-9 p.m. 

The Lipton Cup, which 
will host 1,000 sailors from 
Canada to Florida, is ex- 
pected to include the follow- 
ing classes of sailboats in the 
race: NIO, Optimist, Laser, 



International and Club 420, 
One Design 14, Hustler, Tor- 
nado, Thunderbird and Van- 
guard 15's. 

The Lipton Cup trophy, 
originally given to the Mas- 
sachusetts Bay Yacht Clubs 
Association in 1930 by tea 
magnate Sir Thomas 
Johnstone Lipton, was first 
awarded to Herbert Allbright, 
a victorious skipper in the 
Indian Class sailboat. 

After more than 55 years 



of inactivity, the Lipton Cup 
trophy, nearly three feet tall 
and a silver Victorian splen- 
dor, is once more the object 
of grand sailboat racing com- 
petition in the waters of Mas- 
sachusetts. 

Pre-registration forms are 
available at all of the Massa- 
chusetts Bay Yacht Clubs in 
the South Shore area, or by 
calling Don McGilvray at 
(617) 328-5730. 



The American Red Cross 
of Massachusetts Bay South 
Area will hold its 15th an- 
nual Golf Classic Monday, 
July 24 at the South Shore 
Country Club in Hingham 
with a 1 p.m. shotgun start. 

"This is a perfect way to 
make a significant contribu- 
tion to a charitable cause, and 
have a great day of golf at the 
same time," said Jerry Dacey , 
chairman of the Golf Classic 
Conunittee. 

Other committee members 
include: Robert Goyette, 
Kevin M. Burke, James L. 
Chiccino, Glenn Ferguson, 
Mark Fisher, Michael 
Gianoni, Mae Harris, Daniel 
G. May, Kevin M. Meskell, 
Kathy Palmer, Peter Palmer, 
Daniel J. Flynn, John J. 
Pasciucco, John Spillane, 



Kristen Williams, Lynne 
Houghton, Richard N. Hart, 
Mary Snethen, James 
McLean, Michelle Bowen, 
Mark Luppi and Helen Shea. 
Proceeds from the tourna- 
ment will help Red Cross lo- 
cally to continue its great 
work of: 

• Helping victims of fires, 
storms and other disasters 
recover and rebuild their 
lives. This past year Red 
Cross volunteers responded 
to 24 disaster situations, pro- 
viding emergency assistance 
to 75 families. 

• Preparing parents, co- 
workers and teachers to re- 
spond to emergencies 
through training in First Aid 
and CPR. Volunteers teach 
hundreds of people at the 
Quincy Red Cross office. 



• Protecting children 
through training in water 
safety, injury and disease pre- 
vention, and emergency re- 
sponse. This year volunteers 
went into South Shore el- 
ementary schools and taught 
over 7,000 students how to 
be safe when home alone and 
over 8,000 students water 
safety. 

The entrance fee for the 
tournament is $125 and in- 
cludes a box lunch, greens 
fee, cart, an old fashion bar- 
becue, awards and prizes. 
Hole sponsors, raffle prizes 
and cash donations are also 
welcome. 

For more information, call 
Jerry Dacey at Colonial Fed- 
eral Savings Bank at (617) 
47 1 -0750, or Jackie Gardner 
at the Red Cross at (617) 
770-2600. 



Recreation Department Holds 
City- Wide Basketball Tournament 



21 Residents To Compete 
In Bay State Summer Games 



Twenty-one residents of 
Quincy will be competing in 
the upcoming 19th annual 
Bay State Summer Games. 

The Games begin today 
(Thursday) and will run 
through Sunday, July 23, with 
competitions in 24 different 
sports taking place in the 
greater Boston and greater 
Worcester areas. Over 10,000 



Massachusetts athletes of all 
ages will participate in this 
Olympic-style sports festival. 

The residents are: 

Timothy Keating, la- 
crosse; Amy Jellison, Krystle 
Neves, Kathleen McCarthy, 
Makini Thompson, volley- 
ball; Adam Woo, Phil 
McGillicuddy, basketball; 
Jenna Woods, gymnastics; 



Jim Cabins, Jill Mclnnis, 
Charlie Sorrento, Jordan 
Virture, ice hockey; Richard 
McDonald, Michael 

McNulty, Dan Reilly, swim- 
ming; Ulf Dittmer, table ten- 
nis; Michael Chan, tennis; 
Margaret Crumety, Katy 
Mercurio, Jeff Hunt, Kyle 
Piazza, track & field. 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department recently held its 
first annual city wide Knock- 
out Championship. 

Over 100 participants 
from the 19 playgrounds 
throughout the city competed 
in the basketball event, which 
was organized and run by 
Sports Specialists Geoff 
Meade, Ryan Heriihy, Ryan 
Bell and Patrick 
McDonough. 

Age group winners are: 

Midget Boys: Mike 



Morgan of Mass Fields, 
champion; Matt Sheridan of 
Wollaston, second; Dan 
Richards of Atlantic, third. 

Midget Girls: Catherine 
O'Connell of O'Rourke, 
champion; Vanessa Glover 
of Fore River, second; 
Mikayla Buttomer of Wel- 
come Young, third. 

Junior Boys: Tommy 
Hazelhurst of Palmer Park, 
champion; David Ray of 
Beechwood Knoll, second; 
Chris Randall of Faxon, third. 



Junior Girls: Shauna Kelly 
of Montclair, champion; 
Danielle Kelly of Montclair, 
second; Lauren Stille of 
Forbes Hill, third. 

Senior Boys: Calvin 
Downer of Bradford, cham- 
pion; Dan Reggiannini of 
Kincaide, second; Brian 
Lynch of Atlantic, third. 

Senior Girls: Sarah Shea 
of Perkins, champion; Jen 
Johnson of Montclair, sec- 
ond; Keri Rogers of 
Montclair, third. 



St John's Golf Outing July 24 



Charlie Sacchetti Memorial Golf Tourney 
July 31 At Halifax Country Club 



St. John's annual Golf 
Outing will be held Monday, 
July 24 at Presidents' Golf 
Course. 



The cost to sponsor a hole 
is $1(X), and a sign will be 
placed at the hole indicating 
your support. 



The Charlie Sacchetti Me- 
morial Golf tournament will 
'. be held Monday, July 3 1 at 
the Halifax Country Club. 

The tournament is held in 
menKwy of Charlie Sacchetti, 
who was a member of the 
American Ugion Cyril P. 
Morrisctte Post #294. 



The cost is $85 per person 
and includes fees, carts, sit 
down dinner, awards and 
prizes. The proceeds, which 
have amounted to over 
$2,500 a year for its seventh 
year of existence, are donated 
to the Morrisette Post Schol- 
arship Program. Deserving 



children and grandchildren 
of members of the post are 
awarded scholarship funds 
after acceptance to college. 
If interested in participat- 
ing, contact Triangle Service 
Station, 15 Centre St., Quincy 
02169,orcall(617)472-9517 
for an af^lication. 



For more information, call 
Declan Bresliln at (6 1 7) 786- 
1641, or Mike Gilcoine at 
(617)773-5862or(781)748- 
1 149, pager. 



3 Residents Receive Curry College Awards 



Three Quincy residents John Hill, professional 

recently received awards at development award. 

Curry College, Milton. Tarek Mirshak, manage- 

They are: ment merit award in account- 



ing. 

Elizabeth Wheeler, man- 
agement merit award in ac- 
counting. 



Thursday, Jtiiy 13, 2000 Tlie Qulnoy Sun Page 19 



Crime 
Watch 

By ROBERT HANNA 
Crime Prevention Officer 
Quincy Police Department 




QWNGY POUGE HOT SPOTS 



Crime Watch For Business 

Shoplifting Part II 

How Shoplifters Oiwrgty ; 

• Wear bulky clothing to conceal merchandise 

• Carries dummy packages into which merchandise is 
placed, commonly called a "booster box" 

• Asks to see more merchandise that the clerk can handle 

• Places merchandise between legs and holds it with thighs 

• "Accidentally" knocks merchandise off counter or dis- 
play case onto floor 

• Conceals stolen merchandise inside legitimate purchase 

• Uses an oversized purse, or one with a fake bottom 

• One person creates a diversion while another steals 

• Uses dummy cast or sling on arm 

• Puts merchandise on, and wears it out of the store as if it 
were his/her own 

• Carries a hollowed-out book 

• Conceals merchandise in the clothing or stroller of an 
infant 

• Uses a shopping bag from another store 

• Switches price tags from a lower to a higher priced item 

• Alters price tags during sale 

• Places expensive items in an inexpensive container 

• Carries an umbrella with handle over his/her arm 

• Grabs merchandise and runs for the exit 

• Carries her wallet in hand while she hides stolen mer- 
chandise in her handbag 

• Brazenly walks past employees with large items, such 
as a portable television or luggage 

• Takes more items into fitting room than are brought out 

• Refuses sales clerk services and is continuously on the 
alert 

Next ^yeek: Employee Training 

• From: National Crime Prevention Council 



Monday. .lulv 3 

VANDALISM, 8:46 p.in., 41 Empire St., New Concept 
Christian Day Care. Report that children's playground 
equipment has been damaged. 

VANDALISM, 2:24 p.m., 9 Standish Rd. Windshield 
broken and vehicle dented sometime overnight. 

ATTEMPTED BREAK, 8:05 p.m., 102 Safford St. 
Resident reports that attempt occurred sometime between 2 
a.m. and 3 a.m. this date. 

BREAK, 11:34 p.m., 200 Moody St., Marshall School. 
T^iesdav. Juiv 4 

LARCENY, 8:33 a.m., 94 Newbury Ave. Resident re- 
ports the theft of a cell phone from his vehicle overnight. 

ATTEMPTED BREAK, 8:23 p.m., 174 Warren Ave. 

VANDALISM, 10:25 p.m., 670 Adams St., Burger 
King. Several youths broke a 4-foot x 8-foot pane of glass. 

BREAK, 11:27 p.m., 17 Bayside Rd. 

UNARMED ROBBERY, 999 Quincy Shore Dr., Caddy 
Memorial Park. Victim states he was jumped by 5 males 
who took his wallet. 

Wednesday. July 5 

VANDALISM, 9:00 a.m., 10 Winter St Vehicle was 
damaged overnight. 

LARCENY, 9:04 a.m., 188 Vassall St. Victim reports 
several youths stole a Japanese lantern from her yard. 

LARCENY, 4:38 p.m., 394 Water St. Victim reports the 
theft of a Peugeot Moped. Moped is a late 70's vintage, color 
light blue and white. 

Thursday. July 6 

VANDALISM, 8:14 a.m., Puritan Dr. Resident reports 
someone smeared vehicle with feces sometime overnight. 

LARCENY, 10:07 a.m., 51 Essex St. Resident reports 
the theft of a tool box from driveway. 
Friday, .lulv 7 

ATTEMPTED BREAK, 1:44 p.m., 195 Burgin Park- 
way. Resident reports that lock on building entrance was 
damaged by possible attempted break. 

ATTEMPTED BREAK, 2:10 p.m., 211 West Squantum 
St. Apartment door damaged in apparent attempted break. 

BREAK, 6:55 p.m., 14 Russell St. 
Saturday. July 8 

ATTEMPTED BREAK, 3:02 p.m., 49 Cleaves St. 

VANDALISM, 10:29 p.m., 131 Copeland St. Rear win 
dow of a Nissan Maxima was smashed. 



Sunday, Jul y 9 

BREAK, 9: 16 A.M., 2 Hancock St., Family Thrift Cen- 
ter. 

BREAK, 2:02 p.m., 101 Adams St. Two medical offices 
were broken into. 

BREAK, 3:02 p.m., 69 Cranch St. Resident reports a 
garage broken into. Tools were taken. 

BREAK, 10:52 p.m., 184 Farrington St Apartment bro- 
ken into. 

Total Calls for Service : 1448 

Total Stolen Cars : 5 

Total Arrests : 27 

If you have information on the above crimes, or any crime, 
please call the Quincy Police Detective Bureau at 617-745- 
5764. If you wish to report suspected drug activity, call the 
Drug Hot-Line at 328-4527. You will not be required to 
identify yourself, but it could help. If you wish to contact 
the Crime Prevention Officer for tips or comments, my 
direct line is 617-745-5719. My e-mail address is 
bhanna@ci.quincy.ma.us-Oj^ce/- Robert Hanna. 

STOLEN CARS 



Date Stolen From 


Year/Make/Model 


7/6 21 Faxon Park Rd. 


l994BuickLeSabre 


7/4 85 Pontiac Rd. 


1987 Toyota Pick-up 


7/4 10 Winter St. 


1987 Dodge 


Omni 


7/3 I486 Hancock St. 


1995 Toyota Tercel 


7/3 115 Sumner St. 


*87 Chev. Monte Carlo 


BREAKDOWN OF ARRESTS 




Protective Custody 




7 


Warrant Arrest 




5 


Assault and Battery 




4 


Speeding 


• 


2 


Breaking and Entering Daytime 






Shoplifting 






Possession of Class "D" 






Threats to Commit a Crime 






Malicious Damage 






Assault & Battery with a Dangerou 


s Weapon 




Operating a M/V after Suspension 






Breaking & Entering a M/V 






Annoying Phone Calls 







More Quincy Sun Sports 



Ally Sleiman Finishes Fifth In 
Olympic Wresting Team Trials 

Eyes Comeback For 2004 Games 



Ally Sleiman of Quincy 
finished in fifth place at the 
recent U.S. Olympic Wres- 
tling Team Trials in Dal- 
las, Texas. 

Sleiman fell to Shon 
Lewis of Colorado Springs, 
Colo., 7-0, in the 
quarterfinals after defeat- 
ing five-time national 
champion Charley 

Carbaugh of Colorado 
Springs, 6-3, in the first 
round. 

In the consolation 
round, Sleiman picked up 
his second win of the tour- 
nament with a 9-4 victory 




ALLY SLEIMAN 

"I'm a little disappointed 
to say the least," Sleiman 
said. "I trained really hard 



over Brian Pickering of this year. I did better than 1 
Pensacola, Fla. expected to. It puts me in 



great position for 2004. I'm 
going to take the year off 
and spend more time with 
my family. I'll make a 
comeback in 2004. I defi- 
nitely think 1 can do it. 

"Also, 1 would like to 
thank the City of Quincy 
for supporting me, espe- 
cially my family and 
friends." 

Although Sleiman will 
not be making the trip to 
Sydney, Australia, he will 
serve as an alternate on the 
U.S. Greco- Roman wres- 
tling team after winning the 
North Regional Olympic 
Trials championship in the 
spring. 



Young Voices Fill Quincy Youth 
Baseball's New Sound System 



Quincy Youth Baseball's 
Junior Farm, Softball, Triple 
A and Junior leagues have a 
new sound system for their 
annual All-Star games, 
championship games and 
other events. 

It is used to announce 
players, do play-by-play and 
provide other musical enter- 
tainment before the games 
and between innings. 

"This is the way it should 
be," said Everett Goodrich, 
chairman of the Quincy 
Youth Baseball Board of 
Directors. "Getting the kids 
involved, singing and an- 
nouncing the game, playing 
the music and seeing every- 
one dancing and having a 
good time is what this is all 
about." 

The first event using the 
new system featured Melissa 
Spillane's unaccompanied 
rendition of "The Star 
Spangled Banner" before the 



Softball League All-Star 
Game. Spillane, 14, plays in 
the Softball League for 
Mansfield and Nolan, Ac- 
countants. She was also in- 
vited to sing the National 
Anthem at the Junior League 
All-Star Game. 

The Triple A All-Star 
Game featured the vocal tal- 
ents of 13-year-old Mark 
Richards. Richards is an In- 
ternational League player and 
is also an umpire in the Triple 
A League. He played in the 
1 999 Triple A All-Star Game. 

Play-by-play for the game 
was provided by several 
coaches, but the most enter- 
taining announcing of the 
evening came from 10-year- 
old Laura Leger, the league's 
only female player. Leger is 
a standout player for Flavin 
& Flavin Real Estate & In- 
surance and is coached by 
the league's only female 
coach, Dianna Cassidy. 



In addition to the pre-re- 
corded rock music. Local 
2222 coach Joe Brill led the 
crowd in a sing-a-long ver- 
sion of "Take Me Out To The 
Ballgame" during the sev- 
enth-inning stretch. Brill's 
singing was in the true Harry 
Caray tradition. 

The sponsors of the new 
system were: The Alumni 
Cafe & Dee Dee's, Norfolk 
County Sheriff Mike Bellotti. 
Bank of Canton, Consumer 
Home Mortgage Corporation 
of America, Attorney 
Mary Ellen Cronin (candidate 
for Norfolk County Register 
of Deeds), John & Tina 
Iredale, City Councilor 
Patrick McDermott, The 
Quincy High School Base- 
ball Hall of Fame, The Law 
Offices of Spillane & 
Epstein, P.C, Attorney Jim 
Timmins, and State Repre- 
sentative Steve Tobin. 



Applications Available For 13th Annual Jim Kane 5 Mile Road Race 



Applications are available 
at several Quincy locations 
for the 1 3th annual Jim Kane 
Sugarbowl 5 Miler Road 
Race, which will be held 
Thursday, July 20 at 6:30 
p.m. at the Bayside Expo 
Center. 

The locations are: The 
Dairy Freeze, Adams St.; 



McGinn's Citgo, Newport 
Ave. and Furnace Brook 
Parkway; Barry's Deli, 
Wollaston; OSCO Drug, 
Hancock St., North Quincy; 
Quincy YMCA and week- 
nights at Veterans Memorial 
Stadium from Geoff 
Hennessey, L Street Running 
Club member and director of 



Quincy Track Program. 

The race fee is $ 1 2 before 
July 8 and $15 thereafter. 
Interested runners may also 
register on-line at 
www.lstrcet.org. All partici- 
pants registered before July 
8 will receive a commemo- 
rative Jim Kane Sugarbowl 5 
Miler tank top running shirt. 



The race, hosted by the L 
Street Running Club, is ex- 
pected to draw 2,000 runners 
and walkers. 

New this year, starting at 
4:30 p.m., will be a runner's 
expo featuring running prod- 
ucts and f(Hxls at the start/ 
finish venue. All registered 
runners and walkers areeli- 



gible for the raffle. Prizes 
will include running shoes, 
apparel, tickets to sporting 
events and concerts, and gift 
certificates to a number of 
restaurants in the area. 

The L Street Running 
Club, which has 6(K) mem- 
bers with over 60 from 
Quincy. raises funtjs for, a 



number of charities from 
other endeavors outside of 
the race. In the past, it has 
donated funds to many chari- 
ties and fundraising efforts 
in Quincy. 

For more information or 
to receive a race application 
by maiL call (617) 770-0166 
or(78l)331-525L. . . . . 



TF^ 



■^ ■ v^l^^'"•* *^*"'"'"*? *''"*'^ 



Page 20 



Thursday, July 13, 2000 



Dr. Christine Hubef 
Chiropractor 

You've heard how good Chiropractic care is for you. 
Discover for yourself just how good you can feel. 

1250 Hancock Street, Quincy 

at Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates 
(617) 774-0595 or (617) 774-0611 

Provider for: Harvard Pilgrim, T\ifts, Blue 

Cross, Neighborhood Health, Medicare, 

Mass Health, Motor Vehicle, 

Worker's Compensation and others. 




Get Back On Track With Wellness Goals 



Now's a good time to re- 
new such healthful goals as 
losing weight and increasing 
physical activity-even if you 
thought you'd "hit the wall." 

Yet, there's more to "shap- 
ing up" than just exercising 
a couple of times a month 
and eating the occasional 
salad; you've go to make fit- 



Children 
Teens 



ROBERT AZRAK, Ed.D. 

Licensed Psychologist 
Mass Bay Counseling, 36 Weston Ave., Quincy 

(617) 786-0137 

www.psyrca.com 



Adults 
Families 



€OMPlEn FAMILY HEALTH CAHE SERVICES 

• Treatment of Colds, Plus, etc 

• Annual Physical Examinations 

• Minor Emergency Care 

• Immunization/Pre-Marital Testing 

• Preventive Health Screening 

• Occupational Health Services 



South Shore Health Center Locdwdii 

759GraniteSt.,Braintree.MA02184 Cnuutr rUi/.d 

(781)848-1950 m ihc Croiuid Rr, 

DAVID S. EGILMAN, MD. MPH, MEDICAL DIRECTOR 




ness activities and good-for- 
you foods and beverages a 
part of your everyday rou- 
tine. 

No matter whether you're 
on track on sideU-acked, little 
changes can still make a big 
difference. Here are some 
tips for choosing a sensible 
diet that can easily be 
worked into daily life: 

• Pack a nutrition punch. 
Fortified foods have come a 
long way since salt became 
the first U.S. commercial 
food to be fortified in 1924. 
In the quest to reach your 
nutrition goals, remember 
that breads, cereals, and bev- 
erages with added vitamins 
and minerals pack more nu- 
trition punch. For example. 
Ocean Spray Cranberry 
Juice Cocktail Plus contains 
a higher percentage of cran- 
berry juice than most other 
brands, delivering the uri- 
nary tract health benefits of 
the cranberry. The juice's 
calcium and vitamins E, A, 
and C also may help prevent 
chronic illnesses, such as os- 



teoporosis, heart disease, and 
cancer. 

• "Super size" it . . Not. 

Restaurant meals are increas- 
ingly "super sized," leaving 
patrons stuffed-and guilty 
with the distress of overeat- 
ing. Splitting meals witha 
friend or saving half for later 
can still leave you happy and 
satisfied. Also, the slower 
you eat, the less chance 
you'll overeat. Put your fork 
down between bites and pace 
yourself. 

• How would you like 
that cooked? If you're eat- 
ing out, pay attention to those 
key words: sauteed, fried, 
panseareed, and batter- 
dipped. Calories and fat 
grams skyrocket in these 
types of foods. But you can 
enjoy the same foods by 
choosing alternative prepara- 
tion: grilled or baked fish in- 
stead of batter-dipped; baked 
potato instead of French 
fries; steamed rice instead of 
fried. 

• Lighten up. If you find 
yourself routinely eating the 



same old things, lighten up, 
and choose some new flavor- 
ful foods and beverages. Ac- 
cording to a recent Calorie 
Control Council survey, 72 
percent of respondents agree 
that a wide variety of low- 
calorie and suger-free foods 
would allow them to eat 
more healthfully with little 
loss of taste or quality. 
Choose skim or 1 percent 
milk instead of whole milk, 
or try Ocean Spray 
Lightstyle low-calorie juice 
drinks, which offer fewer 
calories and all the nutrition 
and taste benefits of fruit 
juice. 

• "5 A Day" is the way. 

The average American diet 
does not meet the recom- 
mended guidelines for fruits 
and vegetables (five to nine 
servings per day). Fruit juice 
can be a tasty way to fill the 
gap. Juice counts as one full 
serving of fruit and provides 
130 percent of the recom- 
mended dietary allowance 
for vitamin C. 



ria/ji nrxl 




Manet 
Community 
Health Center, Inc 

Estl979 

Providing Family Practice 
primary health care for all ages 
for the insured and the uninsured 

Medical, Lab, Nutrition, Smoking and HtV Services 

Accredited by At 

Houghs Neck 
Snug Harbor 
North Quincy 
JMrt ftMnMM HuU Medical 

mMxnMaOonc^tkilthanOrotiiiaaotis 




Helping Your Child 
Get a Healthy Start on Life 

Most major Insurances accepted 
Caring, professional staff 
24-hour emergency care 




Dr. George Horn, Pediatrician 

Dr. Ingrid Henar, Pediatrician 

Annette Radzevich, Family Nurse Practitkiner 

(617)773-7754 

• '- -^ Quincy Medicai Center 
114 Whitweil Street 



EIH 



b^ 



South 
Suburban 
Pediatrics 



Smoking, 



American Heart 
AssodadonJ 







WE'RE FIGHTING FOR YOUR LIFE 



BmiHPree ?edl(^Pric DehPal 




ASSOCIATES 



400 Washington Street, Suite 301 

Braintree, MA 02 1 84 

781-356-4544 

specializing in 

children, adolescents 

and 

persons with 

special needs 



Dr Cm^^T\Q ?\Tx\tx 
Dx. John S. VIvelros 



va-vAV-brainfeeDe 



rrJentPlcom 



' m ' ' ^tfi^VfyiArWi^niWTI'iK rVirTl" t <^iS\i'i" ' ' ' i' Wr^im 



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,%•'•%"• 



*•*•«'• •»*«»*««« « I 



• - • • # 



.-A^m'^.^J-^' 




Hearing aid 




Stephen P. Tobias 

Board Certified Hearing 

Instalment Specialist 



'Tips from Tobias" 

"I hMf what I want to hear". 

How would you loiow? This 

statement is commonly used 

t>y people who have not yet 

come to terms with their 

hearing lossi It is painful to 

hear it, t>ecause I l<now that 

they are years away from 

trying to connect their loss. 

Most people are unaware how 

an uncorrected hearing loss can affect their lives. The 

results of a recent survey of over 4000 hearing impaired 

people and their significant others have t)een 

published. Some of the highlights are as follows: 

•People with untreated hearing loss register 

significantly higher levels of depression, anger and 

frustration, anxiety, and other negative emotions than 

do people with comparable hearing loss who use 

hearing aids. 

• Nearly half of the hearing aid wearers surveyed 

reported improvement in their overall quality of life 

attributable to their use of hearing aids. More than 60% 

of the femily members or close friends reported that 

hearing aids had improved tf)e lives of users. 

You cannot afford to ignore a hearing loss. Live your 
life to its fullest and be healthy! 
Now you go and spread the news! Steve 
Stephen Tobias Hearing Center 
488 Quincy Ave, Quincy, MA 02189 
(next to shipyard) 

Have any topics for upcoming Tips"? 
Write or call 61 7 770-3395 



Thursday, July 13, 2000 Tbm Qulnoy Sun Page 21 



I^ELieiCN 



Bethany Congregational 



Bethany Congregational 
church, Quincy Center, will 
have an early worship ser- 
vice in the Bethany Chapel 
on Spear St. Sunday at 8:30 
a.m. 

Another service will be 
held in the Bethany sanctu- 
ary at 10 a.m. 

The Rev. William 
Harding, pastor, will preach 
at both services on "The 
Moment to Decide." 



Scripture reader will be 
Shirley Pyne. Music for this 
service will feature Winslow 
Bettinson, tenor and Rev. 
George Hodgkins, organist. 

Betty Newton will serve 
as greeter. A Fellowship 
Hour will follow the 10 a.m. 
worship service. A One 
Room Sunday School will 
meet at 10 a.m. Childcare 
will be available for infants 
and toddlers. 



Houghs Neck Congregational 



Dr. Peter Corea will 
preach the sermon, "Uncon- 
ditional Immortality" at the 
9:30 a.m. worship service 
Sunday at Houghs Neck Con- 
gregational Church, 310 
Manet Ave, 



The worship service will 
be conducted by Rev. M. 
Alicia Corea. 

Members of the Diaconate 
serving: Ushers Joan Kirby 
and Gloria Brummitt and 
reader Beth Little. 



'Divorce And Beyond' Program 



The Catholic parishes in 
Quincy will offer an eight- 
week program, "Divorce and 
Beyond" beginning Tuesday, 
July 25 at St. John the Baptist 
parish, 7 to 9 p.m. 

The program is designed 
to assist persons who are di- 
vorced or in the process of 



divorcing deal with the many 
emotions which may arise 
during this time. 

Requested fee for the pro- 
gram is $40; space is limited 
to 15 participants. 

For more information, call 
St. John's at 617-773-1021. 



Chris Peter Memorial 
Blood Drive July 18 



The 16th annual Chris 
Peter Memorial Blood Drive 
will be held Tuesday, July 1 8 
from 2 to 8 p.m. in St. Tho- 
mas Aquinas Hall, Darrow 
St., Houghs Neck. 

The American Red Cross 
Blood Drive is sponsored by 
the Peter family. It is held in 
memory of Chris Peter, who 
was killed by a drunk driver 
on Sept. 14, 1984. He was 22 
years old. 

"We prefer this way of 
remembering because most 
of the family donate blood, 
with Chris donating many 
times before he died," said 
his parents, Charlies and 
Trudy Peter. 

"Although the reason for 



the blood drive is Chris's 
death, the blood drive is an 
uplifting place to be. Many 
donors return yearly. We 
have homemade goodies to 
tempt the donors and a craft 
table where small children 
can be entertained while their 
parents donate," the Peters 
added. 

In the past 15 years, the 
Chris Peter Blood Drive has 
collected more than 1500 
pints of blood, averaging 1 05 
[er year at a time when blood 
donations drop to the lowest 
levels of the year. 

Walk-ins are welcome. 

For more information or 
to make an appointment, call 
617-471-9586. 



Inner Peace Seminar Aug. 3 



A seminar enritled "inner 
Peace: The Journey to 
Wholeness" will be held 
Thursday, Aug. 3 from 7 to 
8:30 p.m., 1 1 1 Willard St. 
(lower level), Quincy. 

The seminar will be pre- 
sented by Mary Beth Scalice, 



M.A., Ed. D. 

Focus will be on health, 
wholeness and happiness. 

It is sponsored by Milton 
Chiropractic and Rehabilita- 
tion and the Foundation of 
Open Hearts, a non-profit 
corporation. 



Blood Pressure Clinics 

Blood pressure clinics are Parkingway, Quincy. 
offered at 10 a.m. on the sec- The public is welcome to 

ond and fourth Tuesday of a free blood pressure check 

each month at Hancock Park by a nurse from Managed 

Adult Day Health Center, 1 64 Health Care Systems. 



Quit 


WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 

American Heart fn 


Smoking. 



Vacation Bible School 
At Union Congregational 



Registration At St. John's 
For Religious Education 



Vacation Bible School 
will be held July 17-21 at 
Union Congregational 
Church, 136 Rawson Rd., 
Wollaston. 

The program is open to all 
children ages 3-12 and will 
feature Bible studies, crafts. 



games and songs. A special 
highlight will be a visit from 
the Quincy Police Mounted 
unit and a closing program 
Friday at 6 p.m. 

For more information, call 
the church at 479-6661. 



Registration is now being 
held for next year's Family 
Religious Education Pro- 
gram at St. John's Church. 

The program is for all chil- 
dren in grades kindergarten 
through Confirmation. 

Registration materials or 
more information may be 



obtained by calling the Reli- 
gious Education Office at 
479-0125. 



WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 





Americao Heart 
Association^ 




Assemblies of God 



Tiitim 




158 Wuhmgton M., Quincy 
phone: 773-9797 
Rev. Gregory f . Wheaton, ftstor 
New Summer Schedule 
Morning Worship 
8:30 & 10:30 AM 
4Youth & Children's Ministry 
A*Contemporary Worship 
m vMarriage & Family Group 
■I •International Fellowship 
^^^ •DivorceCare 

Catholic 

Our Lady Of Good 
Counsel Parish 

227 Sea St., Quincy 
(617)472-1408 

MASSES 

Saturday 4:30 p.m. 

Sunday 

9 AM & 11AM 

Daily Mass 9 AM 



Church Of St. John 
The Baptist 

44 Scho<^ St, Quincy 
773-1021 

MASS SCHEDULE: 

Daily 8:00 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 

Saturday 4 p.m. 

Sunday 7, 9 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 

1 1 a.m. -Family Liturgy 

Confessions In Chapel 

Saturday 3-3:45 p.m. 

Rectory: 21 Gay St. 

Handicappad Accessible 

St. Joseph's Church 

550 Washington Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

617-472-6321 

SUNDAY MASSES: 

4 p.m. (On Saturday) 

8:30, 10, 11:30 a.m. & 5 pm 

Weekday Masses 9am 

CONFESSIONS: Saturday, 3:15-3:45 pm 

Handicapped accessiNe & 

Handicapped paridng, side entrance 

air conditioned 



Sacred Heart Church 

'A Roman Catholic Community walking togettier 

in Fiutt), Worstiip, Education and Service' 

386 Hancock St., 

North Quincy, MA 02171 

(617) 328-8666 

Sunday Masses 

4pm (Sal.) 7:45am, 9am (Family Liturgy) 

10:30am (with Choir) 12 noon and 5pm 

Weel(clay Masses 

Mon.-Fri 7am and 9am, Sat. 9am 

Handicapped Accessible 

Confessions 

Sat. 3-3:45pm in Saint Joseph Oratory 



Catholic 

STAR OF THE SEA CHURCH 
Squantum, MA 328-0666 

Sunday Mass (4:00PM Saturday) 

8:30 & 10AM Sunday 

Daily Mass 9:00AM 

Confessions 3:00-3:45PM (sat) 

Baptisms every Sunday at 1 1am 



Saint Ann's Church 

757 Hancock Street Wollaston • 479-5400 

Pastor: Rev. Monsignor Rolaert P. Deeley 

Weekend Mass Schedule: Sat 4:00 & 7:00 PM, 

Sunday 7:00, 8:45, 11:00AM 

Daily Masses: 9:00 AM 

Handicapped Chairtift Available 



St Mary's Church 

95 Crescent St., Quincy • 773-0120 

Masses 

Saturday, 4pm, Sunday 7, 9:30 

& 11:30am, Weekdays 9am 

Handicapped Accessible 

New Members Welcome! 



Congregational 



HOUGHS NECK 

CONGREGATIONAL 

CHURCH 

310 Manet Ave., Quincy 
Sunday Service Of Worship 
9:30 AM Summer Schedule 

Vnconditional Immortality' 

Dr. Peter V. Corea Preaching 

Wheelchair accessible 

Air cor)6itioned 

Use And Observe 

The Sabbath. 

Keep It Holy. 

Or Lose It! 



QUINCY POINT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

444 Washington Street • 773-6424 

10AM Worship Service 

'Leave the Baggage Behind' 

Rev. Leighton Foss, 

Interim Pastor Preaching 



UNION CONGREGATIONAL 
CHURCH 

Beach St. & Rawson Rd.,Wollaston 
479-6661 

'Dancing With the Lord' 
Pastor Rev. John Carl Swanson 



BETHANY CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

Corner of Spear & Coddington Sts., 

Quincy Center * 479-7300 

8:30 a.m. Chapel Service 

10a.m. Sunday Worship 

Rev. William Harding Preaching 

'The Moment To Decide' 

Childcare Available 



Episcopal 



St. Chrysostom's 
Episcopal Church 

Corner of Hancock & Linden Sts. 

Wollaston • (617) 472-0737 
Sunday 8 & 10am 
Holy Eucharist 
Sunday School 
& Nursery at lOam 

Thrift Shop o/)en 
Wed-h'ri I0am-4pm 
Everybody Welcome 




Foursquare Gospel 



The Lord's Planting 

Quincy Foursquare Church 

Corner of Newbury Ave. & 

Sagamore St., N. Quincy 

847-4444 

Sunday Service 1 1am 

Children's Church 10 am 



Methodist 



^ 



QUINCY COMMUNITY 
UNITED METHODIST 
CHURCH 

40 Beale St.. Wollaston • 773-3319 

10 AM Sunday Worship 

Daniel Bollen - Guest Speaker 

'God's Timetat}le' 



^azarene 



Wollaston 
Church Of The Nazarene 

37 East Elm Ave.. Wollaston, 472-5669 

Interim pattor Nth McLaIn 

Rtv. Samuel Chung: Pastor 

Quincy Chinese Cluirch of the Nazarene 

Sunday Services, 6:30am Holy Communion 

9:30am Carrtonese Worship (Stiader Hat) 

9:45am Christian Education (at ages) 

11 am Morning Worship Celeixation 

* Nursery Care and Children's Church through grade 4 

6pm Evening Service (contemporary) 

The Wollaston Church olttK Nazarene is 

air condtioned and wheekh^ accessitile. 

ALL ARE WELCOME 

Protestant 



THE SALVATION ARMY 

6 Baxter St, Quincy • 472-2345 

9:45 SUNDAY SCHOOL 

11AM WORSHIP SERVICE 

6PM PRAISE SERVICE 

7PM TUES WOMEN'S FELLOWSHIP 

7:15PM WED. BIBLE STUDY 



Spiritualist 



First Spiritualist 
Church of Quincy 

40 West St., Quincy, MA 02169 
(617) 770-2246 

Service Wednesdays 8pm 
Pastor Rev. Rita S. Berkowitz, C.H..C.M. 



TO ADVERTISE IN 

THIS DIRECTORY, 

CALL 471-3100 



Page 22 Tbe Qulnoy Sim Thursday, July 13, 2000 



' ' 



' 



I: 



Ceituai^ies 



Rose M. Driscoll, 84 



A funeral Mass for Rose 
M. Driscoll, 84, of Quincy, 
was celebrated yesterday 
(Wednesday) at St. Mary's 
Church, 95 Crescent St. 

She died July 8 at Quincy 
Medical Center. 

Mrs. Driscoll had lived in 
Quincy for the past 6 1 years. 

Wife of the late Daniel J. 
Driscoll, she is survived by 



two daughters, Barbara 
Genoter of Westford and 
Elaine Cannistraro of 
Waltham; five grandchildren 
and seven great-grandchil- 
dren. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Hamel, Wickensand 
Troupe Funeral Home, 26 
Adams St. 



Joseph Rizzo, 87 

steel Fabricator 



John Abraham, 85 

Retired Boston Police Officer 




SCOTT DEWARE 



ATHoueMT 

This would be happier world if people 
always reached proper conclusions based 
on the evidence they see or hear. Too many 
times we are too qoick to criticize and then 
afterwards we are sorry that we have been 
so harsh. Too many times we speak biting 
words before we realize tJie true circum- 
stances of the situation. Wrong conclu- 
sions are too easily reached too often. Here 
is a good example: 

A man was walking down a road ei|joying the scenery and dkl 
not see an approaching car. The driver blew his horn but the man 
kept on walking, unaware of the oncoming car. The driver used his 
brakes and lightly tapped the man down. The scared driver imme- 
diately stopped and when he saw the man was unhurt, he immedi- 
ately condemned the man harshly. Ina moment's time, however, the 
driver was ashamed of his hostile words. The driver discovered the 
pedestrian was deaf and obviotnly could not hear the bom... 

Yes, biting words can often be spoken before we realize the true 
circumstances. Is it not best to exercise caution before reaching a 
conclusion - which could be wrong?... 

Deware Family Funeral Homes 

- Serving All Faiths & Nationalities 

Hannel Chapel 
86 COpeland Street 
Quincy, MA 02170 W. Quincy, MA 02169 

A (617) 472-1137 
Affordability Plus Service 
Advanced Planning *vC?e*nation Service Available 
Services Rendered To Any Distance 



A funeral Mass for Jo- 
seph Rizzo, 87, of Quincy, a 
steel fabricator for 35 years, 
was celebrated July 8 at St. 
Joseph's Church. 

He died July 5 at South 
Shore Hospital in Weymouth 
after a brief illness. 

Mr. Rizzo worked for the 
former Kelek Co. in 
Norwood until he retired at 
65. 



a longtime member of St. 
Joseph's Church. 

He is survived by his 
brother, G. Anthony 'Tony" 
Rizzo of South Weymouth; 
and many nieces and neph- 
ews. 

He was the brother of the 
late Jennie Baldi, Frank 
Rizzo, Eustachio "Starky" 
Rizzo, and Mary Nicastro. 

Burial was in Mt. 



Bom in Aragona, Italy, he WoUaston Cemetery, 
lived most of his life in 

Quincy. He was educated in Funeral arrangements 

the Quincy public schools. were by Sweeney Brothers 

He was a member of the Home for Funerals, 1 Inde- 

Quincy Aragona Society and pendence Ave. 

Virginia McCormack, 77 

Homemaker 



WoJlastoa Chapel v^ 
576 Haxicoclc Stffcfit J - 



A funeral Mass for Vir- 
ginia (Young) McCormack, 
77, of Quincy, a homemaker, 
was celebrated July 7 at the 
Most Blessed Sacrament 
Church. 

She died July 3 at Quincy 
Medical Center after a brief 
illness. 

Mrs. McCormack was 
employed for several years 
at H.P. Hood. 

She was a member of the 
Catholic Daughters of 
America and the Ladies So- 
dality of the Most Blessed 
Sacrament Church. 

She had lived in 



Dorchester before moving to 
Quincy in 1951. 

She is survived by her hus- 
band, James E. McCormack; 
two sons, Thomas F. 
McCormack of Quincy and 
James McCormack of Loui- 
siana; three daughters, Margo 
Psaros ' 'dhd Maureen 
McCormack, both of Quincy, 
and Ginny Pierson of 
WTiitman; 12 grandchildren 
and two great-grandchildren. 

Burial was in Cedar Grove 
Cemetery, Dorchester. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Lydon , Funeral 
Home, 644 Hancocjc St. 



A funeral Mass for John 
Abraham, 85, of Quincy, a 
retired Boston police officer, 
will be celebrated today 
(Thursday) at 10 a.m. at St. 
John's Church. School St. 

He died July 8. 

Mr. Abraham served as 
an officer and detective with 
his twin brother, Tom, at the 
Boston Police Department 
for 38 years. 

After his retirement, he 
worked at the O'Brien Fu- 
neral Home in South Boston 
for almost a decade. 

An avid walker, he won 
gold medals in the Quincy 
SeniorOlympicsandenjoyed 
taking five-mile walks on the 
Castle Island causeway. 

Bom in Boston, he had 



lived in the Ashmont section 
of Dorchester for most of his 
life before moving to Quincy 
1 1 years ago. 

Husband of the late May 
Berry Abraham, he is sur- 
vived by three sons, Jack 
Abraham of Hull, Paul 
Abraham of Charlestown and 
Mark Abraham of Plymouth; 
a brother, William Abraham 
of Winooski, Vt.; and three 
grandchildren. 

Burial will be in New Cal- 
vary Cemetery, Mattapan. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by O'Brien Funeral 
Home. 

Donations may be made 
to the Alzheimer's Associa- 
tion, 1 Kendall Square, Bldg. 
600, Cambridge 02139. 



George Haddad, 82 

Retired Presser In Garment Industry 

A funeral service for Elizabeth Seaver of 

George Haddad, 82, of Stoughton; three brothers, 

Quincy, formerly of Boston, Nicholas Haddad of West 

a retired presser in the gar- Roxbury, Albert Haddad of 

ment industry, was fi^Uf My Westwood, and Foad "Fred" 

8 atthe Annunciation Melkite Haddad of Dedbain; a sister, 

Cathedral, 7 VFW Parkway, Elizabeth NeJame of Johnson 

Roslindale. ; City, NY; five grandchildren 

Mr. Haddad died July 5 at, and several nieces and neph- 

home after a long illness. ews. ; , 

He was a member of the Burial wasinMt. Benedict 



Anthony P. Milano 



A funeral Mass for An- 
thony P. Milano of Quincy 
was celebrated Monday at 




The Cremation Society Of Massachusetts 

"Massachusetts' largest provider of cremation information/' 

The Cremation Society of Massachusetts was established to offer 
an alternative to the costly mortuary-funeral-cemetery-system. We 
believe in offering a reasonable price for a dignified and profes- 
sional service. 

We currently have two location, Quincy and Harwich, to service 
the South Shore and Cape Cod areas. 

If you would like a free no-obligation brochure on our services, 
please call (617) 472-0098, write to 26 Adams St., Quincy, MA 02169, 
or visit our website at www.cremation.org 

Affiliated with the Hamel, Wickens & Troupe Funeral Home. 
A family-owned and operated funeral home since 1932. 

Cremation Society of Massachusetts 



(617) 472-0098 



26 Adams Street, Quincy, MA 02169 
1-800-696-5887 
1-617-472-5888 



678 Main Street, Harwich, MA 02645 
P.O. Box 5312 
1-800-696-5887 



Sacred Heart Church. 

He died July 5. 

Heis survived by his par- 
ents, Maryann Cannata of 
Quincy and Frank Milano of 
Weymouth; his step-father, 
Paul Cannata of Quincy; two 
daughters, Kayla Milano and 
Cassandra Milano, both of 
Tennessee? a step-daughter, 
Reena Duffy of Tennessee; 
two sisters, Rosanne 
Coronella of Quincy and Lisa 
Differ of Weymouth; his 
grandmother, Sadie Cirino of 
Quincy; four nephews; and 
his former wife, Susan 
Milano. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Kcohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 

Donations may he made 
to ihc American Heart Asso- 
ciation, 20 Speen St., 
Framingham 01701. 



American Arabic Benevolent 
Association and the Nicho- 
las G. Beram Veterans Asso- 
ciation. . , , r ; ; . 
He served in the Navy 
during World War U. 



Cemetery in West Roxbury, 
Funeral arrangements- 
were by the Louis M. Kfoury 
Funeral Home iii Brookline. 
,( DK>nations may be made 
to the Cathedral, 7 VFW 



He is survived by his wife, Parkway, Roslindale 02>3 !♦ 

Amelia (Maloof) Haddad; or to the Bay $tate.VJ»JA and 

two daughters, Nancy Hospic;e,,Ipcr 500 Belmont 

Solomon of North Eastonapd St., Suite 215, Brockton 

... 02301. 

Robert F. Mahoney, 6& 

A funeral Mass for Rob- 
ert F. Mahoney, 68, of 
Quincy, a former ironworker 
for the Ironworkers Union 
Local 7, was celebrated July 
6 at St. Brigid's Church. 

He died July 1 at Quincy 
Medical Center 

Bom in South Boston, Mr. 
Mahoney had lived in Quincy 
for many years. 

He served in the Army 
during the Korean War, 

He is survived by his wife, 
Louise V. (Kennedy) 
Mahoney; four sons, Robert 
F. Mahoney Jr. of 
Weymouth, Kevin Mahoney 
of Stoughton, Michael 
Mahoney of Easlon and John 



Mahoney of Holbrook; four 
daughters, Kathleen Lally, 
Linda Mahoney, Paula 
Mahoney and Michelle 
Mahoney, all of Quincy; 
three brothers, Vincent 
Mahoney of South Boston, 
and Joseph Mahoney and 
William Mahoney, both of 
Plymouth; and lOgrandchil- 
dren. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by O'Brien Funeral 
Home, South Boston. 

Donations may be made 
to the Shriners Burns Center, 
51 Blossom St., Boston 
02214. 



,v'.i -»t riiufiiiji'* 




DENNIS SWEENEY 
FUNERAL HOMES 

Quincy 5 First for Three Generations 
Dennis S. Sweeney Joseph M. Reardon 

Funeral Directors 
74 Elm Street • 326 Copeland Street • 611-113-212^ 



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Thursday, July 13, 2000 Tbe Quinoy Sun Page 23 



Francis G. Daley, 86, 

Retired Army Migor 



M. Teresa Harcourt, 87 

Teacher In Quincy Public Schools 



A funeral Mass for Francis 
G. Daley, 86, of Quincy, a 
retired Army major, will be 
celebrated tomorrow (Fri- 
day) at 9 a.m. at St. Ann's 
Church, Wollaston. 

He died July 6 at the 
Brockton Veterans Admin- 
istration Medical Center. 

Mr. Daley served in the 
Army for 28 years, retiring 
in 1965. During World War 
11, Daley was in charge of all 
small boats in New York 
Harbor and when the tug boat 
operators went on strike, he 
and his smaller boats docked 
the Queen Mary. Inciden- 
tally, at sailing time, Daley 
successfully backed up the 
Queen Mary out into the 
stream without any help and 
took off for England. 

Also, while stationed in 
Okinawa, a tanker, which had 
been driven ashore by a ty- 
phoon, was about to be aban- 
doned when Daley volun- 
teered to get it off if he could 
obtain the use of a bulldozer. 
The Navy thought he was 
crazy, but loaned him one. 



He was successful. 

Bom in Boston, he grew 
up in West Roxbury and had 
lived in El Paso, Texas and 
Albuquerque, N.M. before 
moving to Quincy. 

Mr. Daley had an avid in- 
terest in local Indian cultures 
and the history of the South- 
west. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Miriam D. (Rines) Daley; a 
son, Christopher F. Daley of 
West Roxbury; two daugh- 
ters, Pamela Koons of Silver 
City, N.M., and Karen M. 
Daley of San Diego, Calif.; 
and eight grandchildren. 

He was the brother of the 
late Robert Daley. 

Burial will be in Massa- 
chusetts National Cemetery, 
Bourne. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Cancer So- 
ciety, South Regional Cen- 
ter, 1115 West Chestnut St., 
Suite 301, Brockton 02401. 



A funeral Mass for M. 
Teresa Harcourt, 87, of 
Quincy, a teacher in the 
Quincy public schools for 40 
years, was celebrated July 8 
at Most Blessed Sacrament 
Church. 

She died July 3 at Rice- 
Eventide Nursing Home fol- 
lowing a long illness. 

Miss Harcourt taught at 
the former Willard School 
for many years. She later 
served as school librarian at 
Broad Meadows School. 

Bom in Newton, she was 
raised and educated in 
Quincy, where she 11 ved since 
she was a year old. 

She was a graduate of 
Hyannis Teachers College 
and Bridge water State Col- 
lege. 

Miss Harcourt was a past 
president of the Quincy Re- 
tired Teachers Association 
and a member of the board of 
directors of the Manet Com- 
munity Health Center in 
Quincy. 



She volunteered as a na- 
ture guide at South Shore 
Natural Science Center in 
Norwell. 

She was an active mem- 
ber of Most Blessed Sacra- 
ment Parish in Quincy for 
many years, where she served 
as a lector, sang in the choir 
and taught CCD. 

She is survived by four 
sisters, Audrey Dwyer of 
Concord, N.H., Evelyn 
DeRusha of Newton, Bemice 
Patterson of Damariscolta, 
Maine, and Pauline Olney of 
Santa Rose, Calif.; 21 nieces 
and nephews and many 
grandnieces, grandnephews, 
great-grandnieces and great- 
grandnephews. 

Burial was in St. Mary 
Cemetery, Middleboro. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Dennis Sweeney 
Funeral Home, 74 Elm St. 

Donations may be made 
to Most Blessed Sacrament 
Building Fund, 1000 Sea St., 
Quincy 02169. 



Marie M. Abbott, 96 

Teacher in Boston Public Schools 



Beatrice Sirois, 76 

Employee At Superior Brands 



A funeral service for 
Marie Manna Abbott, 96, of 
Quincy, a teacher in the Bos- 
tdn public schools for 40 
years, wais held July 8 at 
Dolan Funeral Home, 
Milton. 

She died July 4 at home. 

Mrs. Abbott was noted for 
her innovative teaching 
methods which used art in 
the classroom. Her methods 
were featured in the teaching 
journal "The Instructor." 

Bom in Messina, Italy, she 
was raised in Boston, and at- 
tended Dorchester High 
School and Boston State 
Teachers College. 

She was a member of the 



Quincy Lodge of the Sons of 
Italy. 

Wife of the late Joseph P. 
Abbott, she is survived by a 
brother, Salvatore Manna of 
Englewood, Fla.; several 
nieces and nephews, includ- 
ing Sylvia Babcock of 
Weymouth, Anthony George 
Manna of Hanover and 
Sherry Bullock of Holbrook; 
and several grandnieces and 
grandnephews. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Donations may be made 
to the Boston Christian As- 
sembly, 242 Cambridge St., 
Boston 02214. 



Barry J. Duane, 68 

Driving Instructor 



A funeral service for 
Beatrice (Robitaille) Sirois, 
76, of Quincy, an employee 
at Superior Brands in Quincy 
for several years, was held 
July 8 at C.C. Shepherd Fu- 
neral Home, Weymouth. 

She died June 30 at 
Quincy Medical Center after 
a brief illness. 

Bom and raised in New 
Bedford, Mrs. Sirois was a 
graduate of Campbell Secre- 
tarial School in New Bedford. 
She was a longtime resident 
of Weymouth and Quincy. 

Wife of the late John L. 
Sirois Jr., she is survived by 
six sons, John L. Sirois III of 
Santa Barbara, Calif, Rich- 
ard Sirois of Bass Lake, Ca- 
lif, Paul Sirois of Clovis, 
Calif., Robert Sirois of 



Abington, David Sirois of 
Nyack, N.Y., and Thomas 
Sirois of Honolulu, Hawaii; 
five daughters, Claudia 
White of Weymouth, Joan 
Sirois and Claire Junkins, 
both of Sandwich, Susan 
Mastanuoni of Rotondi, Italy, 
and Ann Sirois of Brockton; 
six brothers, Louis Robitaille, 
Leo Robitaille, Wilfred 
Robitaille, Hector Robitaille, 
Paul Robitaille and Raymond 
Robitaille; 1 2 grandchildren 
and a great-granddaughter. 

She was the grandmother 
of the late Benjamin Junkins. 

Donations may be made 
to the Trustees of Boston Uni- 
versity, c/o Dr. Sanford 
Auerbach, Dept. of Neurol- 
ogy, 715 Albany St., Boston 
02218. 



A funeral Mass for Barry 
J. Duane, 68, of Quincy, a 
driving instructor, was cel- 
ebrated yesterday (Wednes- 
day) at St. Ann's Church. 

He died Sunday at home. 

Mr. Duane was the 
founder and owner of Vil- 
lage Auto School in Quincy, 
a family business he started 
in 1 975. He worked there for 
25 years. 

He was a member of an 
airplane club, the Middleboro 
Utralight Association, Chap- 
ter 62. 

Bom in Baltimore, Md., 
he had lived in Quincy for 
the past 36 years. 



Husband of the late Joan 
(Fleming) Duane, he is sur- 
vived by two sons, Brian J. 
Duane of South Weymouth 
and David C. Duane of 
Quincy; a daughter, Kathleen 
Sheehy of Stoughton; two 
brothers, Earl G. Duane of 
Florida and Ronald Driscoll 
of Hingham; a loving part- 
ner, Marian A. Flaherty and 
her son, James M. Raherty, 
both of Quincy; and five 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in St. Mary's 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 



Filomena Spatola, 96 

Retired Supervisor 



A funeral Mass for 
Filomena (Bonsignore) 
Spatola, 96, of Quincy, a re- 
tired supervisor, was cel- 
ebrated Monday at St. Ann's 
Church. 

She died July 6 at Will- 
iam B. Rice Eventide Nurs- 
ing Home. 

Mrs. Spatola worked at 
Pilgrim Laundry in Roxbury 
for 40 years, retiring in 1976. 

Bom in Italy, she had lived 
in Randolph and Dorchester 
before moving to Quincy 1 8 
years ago. 

Wife of the late Tino 
Spatola, she is survived by a 



son, Samuel Spatola of 
Brockton; a daughter, Jeanne 
McBrine of West Yarmouth; 
a sister, Ines Maccagnaro of 
Italy; four grandchildren, 
seven great-grandchildren 
and two great-great-grand- 
children. 

Burial was in St. Mary's 
Cemetery, Randolph. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 

Donations may be made 
to American Heart Associa- 
tion, 20 Speen St., 
Framingham 01701. 



Jessie Norton, 87 



A funeral Mass for Jessie 
(Porfert) Norton, 87, of 
Quincy, a traffic officer for 
the City of Quincy, was cel- 
ebrated July 7 at St. Ann's 
Church. 

She died July 4 at Quincy 
Rehabilitation & Nursing 
Center. 



Traffic Officer For The City Of Quincy 

Mrs. Norton was the first three sons, Robert C. Norton 

traffic officer for the Snug of Tampa Bay, Fla., Richard 

Harbor School. F- Norton of Manchester, 

Bom in Brooklyn, N.Y., N.H., and David W. Norton 

she had lived in Jamaica Plain of Hingham; 10 grandchi!- 

before moving to Quincy 57 dren and 8 great-grandchil- 

years ago. ^'^"• 

Wife of the late John F. She was the sister of the 

Norton, she is survived by late Charles Porfert. 



Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Multiple Sclerosis So- 
ciety, 101 First Avenue, 
Waltham 02154. 



Thomas J. Moran Jr., 75 

Retired Bus Driver 



A funeral Mass for Tho- 
mas J. Moran, Jr., 75, of 
Quincy, a retired bus driver, 
was celebrated July 7 at Sa- 
cred Heart Church. 

He died July 4 at home. 

Mr. Moran worked at the 
Massachusetts Convention 
Center in Boston for 15 years, 
reUring in 1990. 

He served in the Army 
during World War II. 

Bom in Boston, he had 
lived in Quincy the past 42 
years. 

Husband of the late Rita 
(Golden) Moran, he is sur- 
vived by a son, Daniel R. 



Moran of South Weymouth; 
two daughters. Donna M. 
Brammer of Texas and Jean 
S. Leone of Milton; a brother, 
James Moran of Quincy; a 
sister, Dorothy Brown of 
Quincy; and five grandchil- 
dren. 

Burial was in Knollwood 
Memorial Park, Canton. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 

Donations may be made 
to the Hospice of the South 
Shore.l(K)BayslateDr.,P.(). 
Box 9060. Brainlree 02184. 



Philip Mihai 

Past President Of South Boston Church 

A funeral service for May (Christo) Mihai; a son, 

Philip Mihai of Quincy, for- David Mihai of Abington; a 

merly of Dorchester, past daughter, Linda Mihai of 

president of St. John the Bap- Weymouth; eight grandchil- 

list Church, was held July 6 dren; and nieces and neph- 

at St. John the Baptist Alba- ews. 



nian Orthodox Church, South 
Boston. 

He died July 3. 

Mr. Mihai was a World 
War II veteran and a member 
of the Albanian American 
Veterans Organization. 

He is survived by his wife. 



He was the brother of the 
late Minella Mihai of Alba- 
nia. 

Donations may be made 
to St. John the Baptist 
Church, 143 Dorchester St., 
P.O. Box 125, South Boston 
02127. 




Social Security: 
A Plan For 
All Seasons 

By LAURIE ZASTROW 

Do you have a seasonal job? 

Landscaping, farming, construction work or a part-time 
job at the local ice cream shop may be seasonal jobs. Even 
though a job may be temporary or seasonal, it's important 
that you and your employer pay Social Security taxes. 
Social Security isn't seasonal, and it isn't just retirement 
- it's protection that extends through all seasons. 

As a young worker with a seasonal job, you may not be 
thinking about what will happen if you can't work because 
you are severely disabled due to a sports injury, vehicle 
accident or illness or if you die at an early age. Unfortu- 
nately, tragedy knows no age. It is possible for a young 
person who has worked and paid Social Security taxes for 
as few as 1 "- years to be eligible for disability benefits and 
for his/her family to be eligible for survivors benefits. 

And, Social Security coverage has another important 
feature. Unlike other benefits, it is portable. Il moves with 
you from job to job throughout your career. Even if you 
don't use it now, your earnings become part of your 
lifetime earnings record. It's your total earnings, not the 
amount of taxes your paid or the number of credits you 
have, that determine your benefit amount. 

What do you have to do to be insured under Social 
Security? You and your employer share the responsibility 
for reporting your earnings. If you cam over $780 a year, 
you and your employer are required to pay Serial Security 
taxes. Your employer deducts Social Security taxes auto- 
matically from your earnings, matches the amount of your 
deduction and reports the total to Social Security. 

You may think that paying Social Security taxes is 
something you can't afford because your employment is 
seasonal or your income is limited. The truth is, you can't 
afford not to pay your Social Security taxes. If you don't 
pay Social Security taxes, you won't qualify for benefits 
for yourself or your family when you stop working be- 
cause of age or disability or death. 

For more information, visit our website at www.ssa.gov, 
or call us toll free at 1-800-772-1213 to speak to a 
representative between the hours of 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. on 
business days. 

(Laurie Zastrow is Social Security manager in Quincy.) 



Page 24 Tli« Qulnoy Sun Thursday, July 13, 2O00 




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1354 Havoock 51;.. Q.u\nc^ Cerrter 
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KING CROSSWORD 



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1. MUSIC: IIow many strings docs a ukulele have? 

2. HISTORY: Who founded the Ottoman dynasty? . 

3. GEOGRAPHY: What is the traditional dividing line 
tetween Manhattan's east and west sides? 

4. STATES: What slate's motto is, "If you seek a pleasant 
leninsula, look about you"? 

5. FOREIGN: What is the common currency in the coun- 
ry of South Africa? 

6. LITERATURE: What was the first land Gulliver 
sncountcred in the satirical novel "Gulliver's Travek"? 

7. MATH: What is the equivalent of die Roman numeral 

8. PRESIDENTS; Who was Dwight Eisenhower's vice 
president? 

9. COMMON KNOWLEDGE: Who is Uie patron saint of 
|:^iicians? 

10. LANGUAJSE<From vrhich language are all die mod- 
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1. Shaft (R) Samuel L. 
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2. Gone In Sixty Se- 
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3. Big Momma's House 
(PG-13) Martin Lawrence 

4. Mission: Impossible 2 
(PG 13) Tom Cruise 

5. Titan AE (PG) Matt 



Damon, Drew Barrymorc 

6. Boys and Girls (PG- 
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7. Dinosaur (PG) D.B. 
Sweeny 

8. Gladiator (R) Russell 
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9. Shanghai Noon (PG- 
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10. Road IVip (R) Amy 
Smart 



ARIES (March 21 to 
April 19) You dislike wait- 
ing for promises to be ful- 
filled and for commitments 
to be kept, but resist your 
headstrong tendency to push 
things along. Patience will 
be rewarded. 

TAURUS (April 20 to 
May 20) Expect continuing 
opposition to your plabs 
from diehard detractors. 
However, your detemaina- 
tioq to see things through 
will carry the day. A Pisces 
has romantic ideas. 

GEMINI (M4y 21 'to June 
20) You might be too tlnte' 
to a troublesome workplace 
situation to deal wifit it suc- 
cessfully. Step away to get a 
better perspective. A solution 
soon become.s obvious. 

CANCER (June 21 taJuly 
22) You ipight suspect that 
someone you tnist has misled 
you on an important matter, 
but a more balanced view of 
things reveals a misundcr- 
sUuiding to be the culprit 

LEO (July 23 to August 
22) The Big C:at's animal 
magnetism has rarely been 
stronger. You can either just 
bask in all that admiration or 
use it to your advantage, 
especially in the workplace. 

VIRGO (August 23 to 
September 22) Someone 
who previously balked at 
cooperating with you on a 
project suddenly has a 
change of heart Accept bodi 
help and advice with grace. 

LIBRA (September 23 to 
October 22) Some hazy 
issues still need to be cleared 

^ ' ' - ..^.. „,„ mnvft on 



friend from die past reaches 
out to re-establish old ties. 

SCORPIO (October 23 to 
November 21) Continued 
positive fall-out follows that 
risky workplace decision 
you made some time ago. 
Your payoff will soon prove 
to be more substantial than 
you expected. 

SAGll'TAKlUS (Nov- 
ember 22 to December 21) A 
persona] relationship contin- 
ues to be, affected by a 
recent unexpected turn of 
events. Things need to work 
themselves out widwut fmr 
ger pointing. 

CAgBirOBN XDecem- 
ber22tt5iaaiiaacy,Jl9)tIt'sa 
wonderful week ler<att-you 
capricious Goats Ip kick (4> 
your heels with frioids or 
family members in some 
well-earned fim and ftivob- 
ty. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 
to Felmiary 18) (!!aution is 
advised before making a 
financial commitment to 
someone you don't really 
know. There are better ways 
to build friendships than 
with risky fiscal dealings. 

PISCES (February 19 to 
March 20) Travel plans con- 
tinue to be favored. A change 
of scenery brings new 
opportunities, both personal- 
ly and professionally. Be 
open to the possibilities. 

YOU WERE BORN 
THIS WEEK: You have a 
strong sense of loyalty that 
shows itseif best in your 
relationships with family 
and Moods. 



Wishing £WeIl® 



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HERE IS A PLEASANT inTLE GAME that will give you a 
meaaaga evary day. Ifa a numarical puzzle designed to speN 
oU your fbrturM. Count the lettera in your first name. If the 
number of letters ia6 or more, auMract 4. If the number Is leas 
than 6. add 3. The result la your key number. Startatthe^>- 
perlefl-ttand comer and check one of your key numbers, left 
to right Then read the meuage ttie letters under the 
checked figures give you. 



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Thursday, July 13, 2000 Tlui Quiiusy Sun Page2S 



Four Named To Positions 
At Bank Of Canton 



The Bank, of Canton 
announces four employees 
have been named to various 
managerial positions within 
the company. 

Jeanine Perrone of 
Cohasset has been named 
vice president of marketing. 

Paula Burke of South 
Weymouth has been named 
business development 
manager. 

Jeanne Roche of 
Pembroke has been named 
assistant vice president and 
will be the manager of the 
bank's new Randolph office. 

Kathie Ludecker of 
Brockton has been named 
assistant branch manager of 
the new Randolph office. 

The Bank of Canton, a 
community bank in 
operation since 1835, has 
offices in Canton Center and 
Quincy and is in the process 
of establishing a new branch 
in Randolph Center. 




JEANINE PERRONE 



PAULA BURKE 




JEANNE ROCHE 



KATHIE LUDECKER 



10 Residents Graduate Curry College 



Ten students from 
Quincy were among the 
graduates at the 121st 
commencement of Curry 
College in Milton. 




COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 00P1552EP 
In the Estate of 

GEORGE J. PARKER 

Late Of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

Date of Death May 8, 2000 

NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

To all persons Interested 
in the above captioned 
estate, a petition has been 
presented praying that the 
last will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
JOSEPH C. PARKER of 
BROCKTON in the County of 
PLYMOUTH be appointed 
executor, named in the will to 
sen/e without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO 
OBJECT THERETO, YOU 
OR YOUR ATTORNEY 
MUST FILE A WRITTEN 
APPEARANCE IN SAID 
COURT AT NORFOLK ON 
OR BEFORE TEN 
O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (1 0:00 AM) ON 
August 9, 2000. 

In addition, you must file 
a written affidavit of 
objections to the petition, 
stating specific facts and 
grounds upon which the 
objection is based, within 
thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
NORFOLK this day, June 26, 
2000. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/13/00 



They are: 

Eric W. Bulman, Mary E. 
Cahill, Cheryl A. Dee, 
Michael E Devane, Brian J. 
Fafaey, Marci E. Galligan, 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 00P1606EP 

In the Estate of 

CLAIRE A. KACZKA 

Late Of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

To all persons interested 
in the above captioned 
estate, a petition has been 
presented praying that the 
last will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
CLAIRE A. CAVANAUGH of 
BRAINTREE in the County 
of NORFOLK and 
DEBORAH BARNES of 
BRAINTREE in the County 
of NORFOLK be appointed 
executors, named in the will 
to serve without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO 
OBJECT THERETO, YOU 
OR YOUR ATTORNEY 
MUST FILE A WRITTEN 
APPEARANCE IN SAID 
COURT AT NORFOLK ON 
OR BEFORE TEN 
O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00 AM) ON 
August 16,2000. 

In addition, you must file 
a written affidavit of 
objections to the petition, 
stating specific facts and 
grounds upon which the 
objection is based, within 
thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
NORFOLK this day, June 30, 
2000. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/13/00 



Charles W. Hughes, Mary T. 
Kohler, Patricia R. Leavitt 
and Patrick A. Quinn. 



Weijun Li 

Receives 

Academic 

Award 

Weijun Li of Webster St., 
North Quincy, was honored 
recently at Northeastern 
University's Honors Day 
banquet. 

Li, a student in the 
College of Engineering, 
received the Sears B. Condit 
achievement award which is 
given to students of 
outstanding academic 
achievement in the senior 
class. 

Blood Drive 

Aug. 4 At 

Milton Hospital 

Milton Hospital, in 
conjunction with the Red 
Cross, will hold a blood 
drive Friday, Aug. 4, from 10 
am. to 4 p.m. at the 
Nangeroni Education Center 
at the hospital, 92 Highland 
St., Milton. 

A sign-up sheet is 
available at the Milton 
Hospital public relations 
office, or phone the PR 
office at 617-6%-4600, ext. 
1220. 




NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

i ' ' ■"■ City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 00-039 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 
of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on TUESDAY, 
AUGUST 1, 2000, at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the application of RALPH AND 
BEATRICE DIMATTIA for a FINDING for a change of office 
use from a sail repair business to a real estate brokerage 
business in accordance with Title 1 7 as amended CHAPTER 
17.24.020 (NON CONFORMANCE) on the premises 
numbered 731 EAST SQUANTUM STREET, SQUANTUM, 
as shown on Assessors Plan 61 20 A. 

Stephen DesRoche, Chairman 
7/13,7/20/00 ' -^ .- . 




NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 00-040 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 
of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on TUESDAY, 
AUGUST 1, 2000, at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the application of JAMES AND 
KAREN WALKER for a SPECIAL PERMIT FLOOD PLAIN 
to construct a one story addition sized at approximately 950 
SF to the existing dwelling in accordance with Title 17 as 
amended CHAPTER 17.40 (FLOOD PLAIN DISTRICT) on 
the premises numbered 381-387 MANET AVENUE, 
HOUGHS NECK, as shown on Assessors Plan 1057K. 

Stephen DesRoche, Chairman 
7/13,7/20/00 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 00-041 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 
of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on TUESDAY, 
AUGUST 1, 2000, at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the application of PETER AIELLO 
for a VARIANCE to demolish existing single family dwelling 
and construct a 1 ,720SF addition to the existing building in 
violation of Title 17 as amended CHAPTER 17.20 
(DIMENSIONAL REQUIREMENTS) on the premises 
numbered 41-45 FRANKUN STREET, QUINCY CENTER, 
as shown on Assessors Plan 3056. 

Stephen DesRoche, Chaimnan 
7/13,7/20/00 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 00-038 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 
of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on TUESDAY, 
AUGUST 1, 2000, at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the application of SNOOKUMS 
REALTY TRUST for a VARIANCE to install a 7' x 5' double 
faced internally illuminated sign cabinet on two 6' x 6' square 
steel poles located approximately 6' from the lot line in 
violation of Title 17 as amended CHAPTER 17.32.070 & 
17.32.080 (SIGNS) on the premises numbered 174-184 
WILLARD STREET & 100-106 ROGERS STREET, WEST 
QUINCY, as shown on Assessors Plan 4066. 

Stephen DesRoche, Chaimian 
7/13,7/20/00 



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CITY OF QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

INVITATION TO BID 

The Department of Public Works for the City of Quincy, 
Massachusetts invites sealed bids from Contractors for the 
Boiler System Replacement at Two Elementary Schools 
Contract, according to the documents prepared by SAR 
Engineering, Inc. in conjunction with the City of Quincy 
Department of Public Works. 

The project consists of demolltk^n of existing boiler systems 
(3) at Snug Harbor Elementary Schools and (2) at the 
Squantum Elementary School; furnishing two new boiler 
systems at each school; removal of all demolished component 
parts and debris; installation of two new boiler units and 
appurtenances at each site, including all piping and 
breeching connections; removal of all asbestos from boilers, 
piping, etc. asbestos exit testing, and all else incidental to 
provide fully operatbnal systems in all respects for the heating 
season commencing on October 15, 2000. 

Bids will be received until 11 :00 AM local time on July 21 , 
2000 in the offk;es of the Commisskmer of Public Works, 55 
Sea Street, Quincy, MA 02169, at whicf*! time and place all 
bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. 

Mailed Bids should be sent to the Department of Public 
Works, 55 Sea Street, Quincy, MA 021 69 and received before 
the date and time specified above, for receipt of general bids. 

All work shall be performed in accordance with the 780 
CMR Massachusetts State Building Code, as last revised, 
and all other industry standards and regulations, unless 
specified or directed otherwise. 

A refundable deposit of $25.00 (certified check or money 
order) is required for each set of Contract Documents. Bidders 
requesting Contract Documents by mail shall pay an 
additional non-refundable amount of $10.00 per set to cover 
shipping and handling costs. All checks shall be made payable 
to the City of Quincy. 

The Contract Documents may be obtained during the 
business hours from 9:00 AM to 3:30 PM at the Offices of 
the Commissioner of Public Works, Contracts/Bidding 
Division, 55 Sea Street, Quincy, MA 021 69 on or after July 
6, 2000. 

General bids shall be accompanied by a bid security in 
the amount of five percent (5%) of the total value of the bid in 
the form described in the Instructions to Bidders. The 
Successful Bidder shall be required to furnish a one hundred 
percent (100%) Construction Performance Bond and a one 
hundred percent (100%) Payment and Materials Bond from 
a surety company acceptable to the City. The bidding and 
award of this contract shall be in full compliance with 
Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 149, as last revised. 

No bidder may withdraw the bid within 60 calendar days 
after the actual date of the opening of the bids. 

All prospective bidders must be certified by the Division of 
Asset Management (DCAM) [fonneriy the Division of Capital 
Planning & Operations (DCPO)] in the Plumbing category. 
The bid will only be valid when accompanied by a Certificate 
of Eligibility issued by the DCPO, showing that the Bidder 
has been approved to bid on projects of the size and nature 
of that advertised, and an update statement summarizing 
the Bidder's record for the period between the latest 
certification and the date the Bidder submits a Bid for this 
Project. 

All Federal/State and City of Quincy regulations in relation 
to Minimum Wage Rates, Minority Work Force, Equal 
Employment Opportunity and Employment of Quincy 
Residents, and Apprenticeship Training must be complied 
with. 

Failure to comply with these requirements may render the 
bid non-responsive, and thus ineligible for further 
consideration. No waiver for any portion of these provisions 
will be granted. The City reserves the right to waive any 
informality in or to reject any or all bids if deemed in the best 
interest of the City. The City does not condone submission 
of unbalanced bids. Such bids may be summarily rejected. 
James A. Sheets David A. Colton 

Mayor Commissioner of Public Works 

7/13/00 



Page 26 TIm Qulnoy Sun Thursday, July 13, 2000 




COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 00P1247GM 
In the MATTER OF 

DEVIN M. MCNAMARA 
In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR APPOINTMENT OF 

GUARDIAN OF MINOR 

To all persons interested 
in the above captioned 
matter, a petition has been 
presented praying that 
DONNA M. BERRY of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK or some other 
suitable person be appointed 
guardian of the person and 
the estate of DEVIN M. 
MCNAMARA, a minor child, 
to serve without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO 
OBJECT THERETO, YOU 
OR YOUR ATTORNEY 
MUST FILE A WRITTEN 
APPEARANCE IN SAID 
COURT AT NORFOLK ON 
OR BEFORE TEN 
O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (1 0:00 AM) ON 
July 26, 2000. 

WITNESS, Hon. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
NORFOLK this day, June 29, 
2000. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
7/13/00 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 00P1 61 2EP 
In the Estate of 
MARGARET L 

PILLSBURY 

Late Of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

To all persons interested 
in the above captioned 
estate, a petition has been 
presented praying that the 
last will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
JANICE M. WIEDEMANN of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
executor, named in the will to 
serve without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO 
OBJECT THERETO, YOU 
OR YOUR ATTORNEY 
MUST FILE A WRITTEN 
APPEARANCE IN SAID 
COURT AT NORFOLK ON 
OR BEFORE TEN 
O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (1 0:00 AM) ON 
August 16, 2000. 

In addition, you must file 
a written affidavit of 
objections to the petition, 
stating specific facts and 
grounds upon which the 
objection is based, within 
thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
NORFOLK this day, June 30, 
2000. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/13/00 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 00P1502EP 

In the Estate of 

VIRGINIA F.BROWN 

Late Of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

To all persons interested 
in the above captioned 
estate, a petition has been 
presented praying that the 
last will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
WILLIAM L. CANNON of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
executor, named in the will to 
sen/e without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO 
OBJECT THERETO. YOU 
OR YOUR ATTORNEY 
MUST FILE A WRITTEN 
APPEARANCE IN SAID 
COURT AT NORFOLK ON 
OR BEFORE TEN 
O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00 AM) ON 
August 2, 2000. 

In addition, you must file 
a written affidavit of 
objections to the petition, 
stating specific facts and 
grounds upon which the 
objection is based, within 
thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
NORFOLK this day, June 20, 
2000. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/13/00 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 00P1509EP 
In the Estate of 

THOMAS F. COLLINS 

Late Of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

Date of Death May 27, 
2000 

NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

To all persons interested 
in the above captioned 
estate, a petition has been 
presented praying that the 
last will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
THOMAS F. COLLINS III of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
executor, named in the will to 
serve without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO 
OBJECT THERETO, YOU 
OR YOUR ATTORNEY 
MUST FILE A WRITTEN 
APPEARANCE IN SAID 
COURT AT NORFOLK ON 
OR BEFORE TEN 
O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00 AM) ON 
August 2, 2000. 

In addition, you must file 
a written affidavit of 
objections to the petition, 
stating specific facts and 
grounds upon which the 
objection is based, within 
thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance' 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
NORFOLK this day, June 20, 
2000. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/13/00 




Save Gas 
& Money. 

Shop Locally 



CITY OF QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

INVITATION TO BID 

The Department of Public Works for the City of Quincy, 
Massachusetts will receive sealed bids for the Street 
Resurfacing & Improvements Pi'ojcict - Spring/Summer 
2000 until 10:00 AM local time July 26, 2000 in the offices 
of the Commissioner of Public Works, 55 Sea Street, Quincy, 
Massachusetts 02169, at which time and place all bids will 
be publicly opened and read aloud. 

The work under this contract consists of cold planing and 
overtay of existing travelways; removing and replacing existing 
bituminous and cement concrete sidewalks including removal 
and resetting of existing and installation of new granite and 
bituminous concrete curbing, installation of wheel chair 
ramps, adjustment of all utility castings, loaming and seeding 
of grass borders and installation of pavement striping and all 
additional work incidental thereto. All work under this contract 
Shalt be completed within 180 calendar days. 

A non-refundable deposit of $50.00 in cash or check 
payable to the City of Quincy shall be required for each set 
of Contract Documents. Bidders requesting Contract 
Documents by mail shall also include an additional non- 
refundable mall fee of S15.00 in cash or check payable to 
the City of Quincy. The Contract Documents may be obtained 
during the business hours of 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM at the offices 
of the Commissioner of Public Worths, Engineering Division, 
55 Sea Street, Quincy, MA 02169 on or after July 12, 2000. 
Each bid shall be accompanied by a bid security in the 
amount of five percent (5%) of the total value of the bid in the 
form of bid bond or certified/treasurer's check. 

The bidding and award of this contract shall be in full 
compliance with Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 30, 
Section 39M, as last revised. All Federal, State and City of 
Quincy regulations in relation to Minority Business Enterprise, 
Women's Business Enterprise, Minority Work Force, Equal 
Employment Opportunity, Employment of Quincy Residents 
and Minimum Wage Rates shall be complied with. 

The City reserves the right to waive any infomnality in or to 
reject any or all Bids when such an action is deemed in the 
best interest of the City. Non-r—pons hw and/or unbalancsd 
bids may be rejected. 
James A. Sheets Davkl A. Cotton 

Mayor Commissioner of Public Works 

7/13/00 



Alzheimer Care 

Courses At 
Medical Center 

*A four week course on 
the "Nuts and Bolts of 
Alzheimer Care dt Home for 
Family Caregivers" will 
begin July 17 from 6:30 to 8 
p.m. at Quincy Medical 
Center, 1 14 Whitwell St.. 
Conference Room A. 

Fee for the course, which 
runs through Aug. 7, is $35. 

To register, call Beverly 
Moore at 1-617-233-1145. 

Light refreshments will be 
served. 

In addition, an 
educati(Mial group on Family 
Orientation to Alzheimers 
meets the second Monday of 
every month from 6:30 to 
8:30 p.m. in Conference 
Room A at Quincy Medical 
Center. 

The group is facilitated by 
Beverly Moore. 

To register for the 
orientation group, call 
Beverly Moore at 617-233- 
1145. 



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COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Nortolk Division 

Docket 00P1595EP 

In the Estate of 

NICOLA CAPELLUPO AKA 

NICK CAPELLUPO 

Late Of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE OF PEirnoN 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

To all persons interested 
in the above captioned 
estate, a petition has been 
presented praying that the 
. last will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
KATHIA A. CAPELLUPO of 
CHARLESTOWN in the 
County of SUFFOLK be 
appointed executor, named 
in the will to serve without 
surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO 
OBJECT THERETO, YOU 
OR YOUR ATTORNEY 
MUST FILE A WRITTEN 
APPEARANCE IN SAID 
COURT AT NORFOLK ON 
OR BEFORE TEN 
O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (1 0:00 AM) ON 
August 16, 2000. 

In addition, you must file 
a written affidavit of 
objections to the petition, 
stating specific facts and 
grounds upon which the 
objection is based, within 
thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. DavW H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
NORFOLK this day, June 29, 
2000. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/13/00 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 

Here's a chance 

to earn extra money 

by building a 

Quincy Sun home 

delivery route. 

Telephone 
471-3100 



OPENING! 

ZOOTS IS COMING TO CLEAN 

UP N, Quincy & Milton, MaI 



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** Receptionist ** 

Brand new nursing care facility opening in Marina Bay in 
Quincy is sefeking an enthusiastic, motivated & reliable 
individual with excellent communication skills and word 
processing experience. Candidate must t>e able to handle 
multiple tasks and maintain an excellent phone manner. 
This F.T. position is available immediately as training will 
begin in our Neponset Circle location. 

Call for an appointment 617-282-3600 

Fax resume to 617-282-0313 

NEPONSET CIRCLE SKILLED NURSING & REHAB. CENTER 

DORCHESTER, MA 02122 7/13 




Mr & Mrs Paul Crump 

announce the arrival of 

James Michael on June 

29. Congratulations 

from Papa & Patrina 



7/13 



Thank You God 
Say 9 Hail Mary's for 9 days, 
ask for 3 wishes, 1 business, 
2 impossible. Publish on 9th 
day. Your wishes will be an- 
swered. B.B.7/13 



'88 Nissan Electra 

standard . 

$1,800 

471-4347 



7/13 



GIRLS HUFFY 
lO-SPEED MOUNTAIN BIKE 

like new condition. Helmet, 

racii for car. Price 

negotiable on all items. 

evenings, weekends 

328-3612 7/13 



Thank You- 

St Jude 

Blessed Mary 




BAN 7/20 



NEWSCARRIERS 

WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Please call 471-3100 



Old Sports Pocket Sched- 
ules, Tickets. Programs, 
Yearbooks. Professional 
or minors. Pre 1980. Call 
Nick at 978-851-8711 7/13 



Listings Wanted 
Ed McAllister of 
Cooperative Realty 
617-773-0114 7/13 



Community Programs At 
Quincy Medical Center 



The following free 
community programs are 
offered by Quincy Medical 
Center on a regular basis. 

For further information 
about any of the following 
programs, call the phone 
number listed after the 
program. 

• Free Care Clinic: Free 
episodic care for adults 
without insurance at the 
Southwest Community 
Center, 388 Granite St., 
Quincy, every Monday from 
4 to 7 p.m. Episodic care 
helps people who have 
minor health concerns such 
as rashes, sprains, and upper 
respiratory infections, who 
are in need of a simple 
physician or a blood 
pressure clieck. Mijor 



injuries such as broken 
bones or those requiring 
stitches need to be treated in 
a hospital emergency room. 
For more information, call 
(617) 376-5506. 

• Blood Pressure 
Screening: First and third 
Tiiesday of each month, 1 :30 
to 2:30 p.m. in Ambulatory 
Care Department, second 
floor. No appointment 
necessary for free service. 
Call (617) 376-4016. 

• Senior Dinner 
Program: Discounted 
dinner in cafeteria every 
Thursday from 4:30 to 6 
p.m. Cost $4, includes 
entree, vegetable, salad, 
dinner roll, starch, dessert 
and drink. For more 
information, call (617) 376- 
4016. 



Thprsday, July 13, 2000 T|&e Quincy Sun Page 27 




A NEW HALL 

Elks Lane, off 254 Quarry St, 

For Weddings, Showers, 

Meetings and Banquets. 

QUINCY ELKS 



TF 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincfy 

K of C Building 

5 Mollis Avenue 
For Infommthm Plaaae Call 
' 767-0619 



HAND TOOLS WANTED 

Wood or steel planes. Also, 
chisels, clamps, tool chests, 
old handtools, all trades (ma- 
chinist, pattern maker, watqh- 
^maker, etc.) shop tots. Also, 
antiquarian books," frames, 
pairitihgs, crocks, lanterns. 
Antiques in estate lots. 
1-617-558-3839 



TF 



Wallpaper and Painting 

by the Paperboy 

Gerard Shea 

Graduate of US School of Profas- 

shnal Paper Hanging, Rutland, VT 

617-471-5089 



TF 



The Bryan Room VFW 

24 Broad St., Quincy 

■2 newly renovated 
function halls available. 

Large roprn 400+ 
small room 150 guests. 

1-800-474-6234 



Mdrina Bay area 

600 sq. ft. office /w 

parking $475/mQ. 

617-328-1443 

328-0102 



TF 




HERITAGE HALL 

American Legion Post #114 
Weddings, Meetings, All 

Occasions 

114 Granite Ave., Milton 

617-696-3836 




Gardener Wanted 

Squantum yard seeking 
person who likes gardening 
and perennials for regular 
plant care. Will pay hourly. 
Call 786-9435 



** 7/18 




Prayer and understanding of 
God, also called Spirit, Truth, 
Mind, Soul and Love in the 
Biljle. ^brings. us into natural 
health as we realize our own 
native s|:Mrituality. Anyone can 
be helped in prayer and heal- 
ing - phone Finn (617) 448- 
1053, 6-7am, 8-1 0pm or week- 
ends. 7/27 



Work 3 shifts & poy 
for summer vocotioii! 

OPEN HOUSE 

Wed., July 19 

Coll for oppt. & location 
Nurses needed for liome visits 

RNsto$50/visH 
RNsto$32/hr. 
lPNsfo$27/visH 
LPNsto$26/hr. 
€NA/HIIAsto$17/hr. 
Relioble transportation 

preferred for HHAs 
1 yr. current exp. req'd 

1188-691-4116 




www.favoritenurses.com 






JAXQl 



vurtmSs^ 



fJktOtlfg 




mmmsmm^mf' 



4/13 



$9.00/HOUR TO START 



• RGIS INVENTORY SPECIALISTS IS LOOKING FOR SELF- 
MOTIVATED INDIVIDUALS LOOKING FOR WORK IN A FAST- 
PACED ENVIRONMENT 

• NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY 

• RGIS HAS II^MEDIATE OPENINGS FOR INVENTORY 
AUDITORS 

•ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE RIGHT PEOPLE 

• DAY AND NIGHT/WEEKEND POSITIONS AVAILABLE. 
AVERAGE HOURS DEPEND ON YOUR SCHEDULING 
AVAILABILITY. 

• PAID TRAINING FOR QUALIFIED APPLICANTS. 

• MUST BE 18 YEARS OF AGE. 

• WILLING TO WORK IN/AROUND GREATER BOSTON AREA 

• HAVE ACCESS TO TRANSPORTATION. 

• MOST LOCATIONS T ACCESSIBLE. 

CALL THE BOSTON CENTRAL OFFICE AT 

617-484-1788 MONDAY THRU FRII3AY 9AM-4PM 

WE ARE AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 

RGIS INVENTORY SPECIALISTS 



V31 



Roman Electric 

Fiesidential, Commercial, Alami Systems, 
AC Installations, Fast Response, Free 
Estimates. Fully insured. Lie i37566. 
781-601-6302 or 1'877-41-ROUAN 

wsrf us at www.Romanelectric.net ir 



W^m^^t0: 



EAT ALL DAY 
& MELT AWAY! 

Call (617) 696-8358 

Email: 

weightloss @ma. freei. net 



Precision Heating & Air Conditioning 

T/te Om ^top Cn¥U* CompMig 

We Sen/ice & Install 

• Oil/Gas Heating Systems • Oil/Gas Water Heaters 

• Oil/Gas Bumers • Residential Air Conditioning 

• Oil Tanks Removed & Replaced 

$en/ice . . . It's Our Only Business tf 

Annual Tune Ups $70, includes nozzle & oil filter 
617-472-8641 24 hour Emergency Service Jerry LaFlamme 



Host Internationai 
Students! 

The English Language 
Center is looking for en- 
thusiastic hosts inter- 
ested in becoming part of 
our successful homestay 
program for short and 
long term students. Re- 
imbursement for meals 
and expenses: up to 
$700 per month. Contact 
Nichole at: 617-536-9788 



7/13 




ST. JUDE NOVENA 

May the Sacred heart of 
Jesus be adored, loved 
and preserved throughout 
the world now and for- 
ever. Sacred heart of 
Jesus pray for us, St. 
Jude worker of miracles 
pray for us, St. Jude 
helper of the hopeless 
pray for us. Say this 
prayer nine times a day 
for nine days and your 
prayers will be answered. 
This prayer must be pub- 
lished. 



J.O.F 7/13 



Timothy J. O'Brien 

Building & 

Remodeling 

Decks, Dormers, 

Additions, Siding, 

Windows, Repairs 

479-6685 

Licensed, Insured 
Free Estimates 

MA Reg. #116180 



TF 



No problem 
P.B. CONSTRUCTION 

Painting & Carpentry 
Replacement Windows 
617-967-6220 Lie & Ins. 
Ask for Paul Burke 7/27 



Lawford Plumbing 

Small Jobs • Faucet 
• Toilet & Heat Repairs 

• Drain Cleaning 

• Garbage Disposals 

Installed 

24 Hour Service. 

Master Lie. #7306 

781-849-6184 9/7 



Windows Wash 

Please call 

328-4819 

328-0726 



7/20 



HOUSECbEANER 

Clean by Maria Fatima 

A professional housecleaner 

10 experience 

excellent references 

Call 508-872-2613 s/io 



Les Young's 
Complete Handyman Services 

All the Little Things 

Carpentry, Painting, Window 

Repair & Replacement, 

Bathrooms, Tiie Work, 

Cabinets/Tops 

617-328-5855 



8/3 



A & T VACUUM 

• $19.95 Overhaul Special 
on any vacuum. 

• Sewing machine repairing 

• VCR repairing and cleaning 

• Sharpening 
(scissors, knives, etc.) 

• Oreck XL Vacuums $249 

• Electrolux w/power nojzJe $1 99 

• Used vacuums $45 & up 

27 Beale St., Wollaston 
479-5066 



TF 



KEITH'S SERVICES 

Gen Building Maintenance 

Call for all your Interior 

Si Exterior needs 

Insured, Quality Workmanship, Great Rates 
617-479-8852 781-254-6769 
781-834-1229 tf 



YARD SERVICES 

LAWNS MOWED, 

RAKING, TRIMMING, 

MULCHING, 

FERTILIZING ETC. 

ODD JOBS 

FREE EST 

CALL 61 7-770-4593 

1-800-670-0868 tf 



Justice Lenore Birks 

Performs Unique Wedding 

Ceremonies 

Civil or Spiritual 

Call (617) 472-7454 

email lenore9@webtv.net 7/13 



E& K Construction 

Remodeling, Kitchens & Battis, 
Windows, Finished Work, Gen- 
eral Carpentry & Painting. 
Brendan 617-328-6240 
Dermot 617-787-4924 8/31 



Weddings 

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMES 

Weddings from $998 

James Kazoiias 

Qssipee, N.H. 
1-800-322-0454, evenings 



7/22 



Your South Sfiore 
Headquarters For 
Appliance 
Service 
& Parts 
For All 
Major 
Appliances 




hancock tire 
& appliance 

115 FranlcJin Street 
Soutli Quincy •472-1710 



YARD WORK CO. 

• Reliable Lawn 
Mowing Sen/ice 

• Expert Bush & Hedge 
Trimming 

• Yard Cleanup 

• Fertilize Lawn 

• Mulch Work 

Experienced 
FREE Estimate 
Call Bill Fielding 

471-6124 



TF 



T. Lyncti Electric 

Residential, Commercial 

No job too small. 
Fully insured, lie #39339, 
-' - -free estimates 
781-335-4081 m? 



CARPENTRY 

"It's A Little Job" 

Expensive, NO! 

Your price will fix it rigtit 

617-472-0556 ^31 



O'Meara's 
Painting Co. 

Great Rates 
617-840-4987 



7/13 



FRED'S HANDYMAN 

Looking for small mainte- 
nance work, painting, car- 
pentry, window repairs & re- 
placements. Call Fred 472- 
8778 



a/24 



Sun Classified Ads 
Get Results! 




LEARN ANEW SKII-L- 

CUSTOMER 

SERVICE REP 

FREE Training for 

the Job of Tomorrow. 

If you "like people" and work 

in retail or work as waitstaff 

now is the time to get new 

skills for the new workforce 

of the millennium. 

Customer Service 

Representatives 

Classes are 
beginning NOW! 
Call for an appointment or walk In 
(we are directly across from the Quincy Center T) 
We also do office clerical and administrative placements. 

Join GSR Solutions Today 

1212 Hancock Street, #101, Quincy 
617-472-9009, Fax 61 7-472-1 991 
email: csrsolutions@msn.com 7/13 



MlfTim 



Spedalbdnfl In Swvlct Staffing 




MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1371 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 

RATES 

1 WEEK □ $5.50 for one insertion, up to 20 words, 

* 100 for each additional word. 

3-7 WEEKS □ $5.00 per insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 insertions of 

the same ad, 100 each additional word. 

8-12 WEEKS □ $4.60 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 8- 1 2 insertions 
. of the same ad 100 for each additional word. 



INDEX 

Services 

□ For Sale 
G Autos 
G Boats 

□ For Rent 

□ Wanted 

□ Help Wanted 

□ Work Wanted 

□ Pets 

□ Lost & Found 
G Real Estate 
G Antiques 

□ Flea Markets 

□ Yard Sales 
G Instruction 

□ Daycare 
G Personal 

G Miscellaneous 



13 WEEKS 
OR MORE C 

□ Enclosed is $ 
weeks in 

COPY: 



$4.30 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 1 3 or more 
insertions of the same ad 1 00 for each additional word. 

for the following ad to run 



Lcy 



NO REFUND WILL BE MADE AT THIS CONTRACT RATE IN THE EVENT OF CANCELLATION. 
DEADLINE: MONDAY, 5:00PM. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMBER IN AD. 



■(^■^^■^ 



'Jjn-- • >*' 



» V 



•> •« r ► \ 



> t » 

• .4 «. . 



1\ 



Pi^tc28 TH(M Qulncy Sun ThufBday, July 13, 2000 



« 



Neighbors, Groups Agree On Need To Fill Granite Rail 



fact that the now filled q«any b with 825,000 tons Swingles Quarry and the 

Swingles Quarry, owned by of Central Artery Project unfilled Big Granite Rail 

the city and with parking of (Big Dig) fill. The MDC Q»fry, which could cause a 

its own, is not included in would receive $1 of the $16 ~cksl»de jind wall collapse; 

the MDC Master Plan for — ♦«« t;««;«« f-- ...i.;„i. and the fact that, with the 



(Cont 'dfrom page 1) 

the Quincy Conservation 
Commission Wednesday, 
July 19. 

Those in attendance in- 
cluded members of the 

Friends of The Blue Hills, y^" «« ^^ » P^^*^ «"<• «"<* a "expendable trust" specifi- ,. ^. ^,,^^ . „^^ . . 
members of the Quincy parking lot in the middle of caliy earmarked for the fu- ^"tn^«^J^Sl,"r:J fi^^ 



of the quarry a "dump" or Commission. "We'll work 

"landfill" and blamed years on it (the proposal) from 

of mismanagement for now until the 19th as much 

making it that way. "There's as we can and hopefully 

no way replicated wetlands come up with some alterna- 



Big Granite Rail. "Where do would create an $825,000 



Sr:.rir!A'i,?<i^ discover, of, i- pucs. 30 can ,cpl«e. he crystal ckar Uv«" 



feet of timber, cars, and de- 



Quarries Advisory Com- 



it? 



ture upkeep of the park. 



nically a solid waste landfill 



vu«.,.c* «uv.5u.y ^um- member I arrv r- *^ k • /.u » Tu- and, by law, must be filled 

mittee, representatives of soda^^addTesTed oe^ceo ^ray emphasized thatth.s 3„d'4ped. "This will solve 

the Appalachian Mountain .^"^^'■^"^j^^f/^^^^^^^^ 1^'^^^. '"on/y. ^y law could be J^^^^ environmental 

Club, and neighborhood "ons mai nis group, since it -- ' 



residents. 

For the most part, debate 
centered not on filling the 
quarry but on the specifics: 
where to replicate lost wet- 
lands; where to place hand 



filed an appeal two years 
ago to stop MDC draining 
of the quarry, was against 
draining it now, which So- 
dano said was false. "The 
climbers, in a nutshell, are 



capped and general parking; f ^°^ '! i*''*^ «"!"«)'" ?«- 
how to best accommodate ^''"** ^«'^' explaining that 



used for no other purpose 
and that it could be en- 
hanced by public and pri- 
vate contributions. 

The plan also calls for 
replication of wetlands lost 
by the fill-in and the de- 
struction of the unstable 



problem and many safety 
problems," Donahue said 



water of those quarries, 
argued Thomas Palmer, a 
representative from the 
FOTBH. "There seems to be 
an open season on water in 
the reservations." 

But Palmer also made 



The meeting took an 
awkward turn early on when 
friends and family members 
brought up the case of 
Karen Hammond, 21, of 
South Boston, who disap- 
peared in 1994 and is 
thought, by some, to possi- 



the large group of climbers 
who make use of the rock 
ledges; and what, if any, 
long-term plans the MDC 
has for the use and upkeep 
of the park. 

"We're trying to preserve 
the historic integrity of the 
area," said David Hodgdon 
of both the QQAC and the 
FOTBH. "These folks (the 
MDC and the city) need to 
get their act together and 
come up with a plan 
jointly," a reference to the 



you a thing here tonight,' 
Flynn said, referring to fu- 
ture fiscal commitments. 
"But filling the quarry is the 



stone wall perched above 

the original appeal was the one quarry which is com- 

only way his group could prised of unusable granite 

play any role in the deci- blocks from quarrying days, 
sion-making process at the Brian Donahue, senior 

time. "We are pragmatic, program manager for the . . ^u . .w 

We are not going to oppose adjacent Quarry Hills Asso- "j^^^^y^^' \^7*^ ' "°^^'"8 

the filling of the park, but ciates 27-hole golf course, * ""' " ' """' 

we do see this as an oppor- has been given more scope 

tunity for input, a chance for and is now also a consultant 

a win/win situation." for the Big Granite Rail 

The current MDC plan Quarry filling project, 
calls for draining of the re- Donahue said the fill was 

maining 40 feet of water in a necessity for two primary 

reasons: an -unstable wall 



clear his wish to end the 

Pat Flynn of the MDC tragedies so common to the bly be in the quarry. 

Reservations Division ?"«.7^*^«; "™,^ •^,«" ^PP^^^^^ Gray responded to 
aereed that, much to his tunity to end the horror J .• u 
dfsappointm;nt, the site was story^f so many needless [J'rtL%rfoIk%:u'mf 
indeed a landfill and that deaths, which is the primary olVoLe af^er an exten 
filling it was the only first benefit (of the filling)," P^ « ^^^J^' *«f ' «" «^^«n- 
««, •* " J D„i™«, «^i.»»»,i.H»oH "Rnt sive search, no longer con- 
step. "We can't guarantee Palmer acknowledged. _ But ,u;„„«rrv a rnn,. 



there are also downsides. 



Big Granite Rail by mid- 
summer and filling the 



rConn««tin^,4be ijow-filled 



there now but a very dan- 
gerous pit." 

Flynn also added that 
he'd "much rather 2,000 
tourists than two teenage 

jninks diving off to escape 
the police." 

Many in the audience 
took issue with the calling 




. f^75 Hancock St., North Quincy 



J \ '-^ U 




Meeting the grocery 
needs of Wpllaston^ 



••^Vi-* 




utnq/ 



Now that's a real victory! k^^^ 



This weeks FOODMART specials 



'^#8888 



A 



50(1: OFF 



Any Item in our 

new & expanded 

frozen food 

section 




Black Mountain 

Premium Gourmet 

Gold Coffee 



Single Serving 
(lA oz.) 



K 



I 

Reg. price, JI.99 & up only. I 

Prices good now thru Wed., July 1 9, 2000 

One coupon per customer. \ 

y 




49(1: 



Prices good now thru Wed., July 1 9, 2000. One coupon per customer. 



r 



^ 



SUNDAY BREAKFAST SPECIAL 

4 for $5 

• 1 dozen large eggs • 1 quart of VJest Lynn Orange Juice 

• 1 gallon of West Lynn Milk (1 %, 2% or fat free) 

• Your Choice of the Boston Globe or Herald 

Offer valid while supplies last, one special per coupon. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Valid Sunday 7/16/00 only. 

Valid only at 475 Hancock Street, North Quincy location. 

Your Osco in North Quincy, a one-stop store 
committed to your neighborhood. 

Gas, Electric and Phone Bills also accepted. (Mon-Fri 9am-3pm) 



y 



sidered the quarry a crime 

We're"'bisney-'fying''The ^^"f,!";?7*f '" ^Hf^^ «] 
whole area. Is that reallv ^he MDC s plans. I would 

say that question would 



whole area. Is that really 
what we want from our res- 
ervations?" 

One part of the plan 
which especially pleased 
climbers was that the fill 
will only go pp to the his- 
toric water line of 170 feet 
and that many of the ledges 
and climbing routes will be. 
left intact 



have to be referred to the 
governor's office," Gray 
added. 

The MDC needs ap- 
proval from the Quincy 
Conservation Commission, 
the Massachusetts Environ- 
ment^ Protection Agency, 
and the U.S. Army Corps of 



Some residents suggest^ • Engineers and says time is 
the filling in of all the^ quar- of the essence because Big 
ries except the Bunker Hill D»g fill will only be avail- 
Quarries, arguinglhat they , ^aj)je until September 1. 
were the only ones of true "written comments on the 
historic value. "Tfiat plan can be sent to' the QC(J, 
(Bunker Hill Qula^les) is a MEPA by July 14, or the 
beautiful site, and!it$rv^ttlt^ .^w^w^^s at: Gregory Penta 
looking into," Gray said. » , Jj >the^^lew England District 

Gray was optimistic Office,.XJ.S..^my Corps of 



about the July 19 hearing of 
the Quincy Conservation 



Engineere,o96 Virginia Rd., 
Concord 01742. ,; 



ITTf 



! ^M't' iM^t !^ 





TARQT «^ PAbM 

24 BILLINGS RD., QUINCY, h^^•, 0-ii\-MSO 
NOWOFFfrtfNC 

iREUUHTPNQSIS 

ByHtii Keher, RN, APP, CHT 

Mondays 3-9pm, Starting July 3i 2000 

CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT 




by Tony Centorino, Kevin McGroarty and BUI Starkie 



CHECKED YOUR BRAKE FLUID LATELY? 

It is a simple matter of pop- care center for most every sys- 



ping the hood and checking the 
master cylinder to inspect the 
condition of a veTiide's brake fluid. 
If the normally clear fluid is dark, 
it shouk) be drained and replaced. 
In fact, it is a good kiea to flush the 
leaking system every 2 to 3 years 
(sooner, hf the owner's manual so 
indicates) as a preventive mea- 
sure. Because brake fluid attracts 
moisture, any water that gets into 
the system will eventually rust 
and damage brake parts from ttie 
inside. Rushing the system of 
contaminated brake flukj on a 
regular basis is a good way to 
avokl an expensive retHiikJ of the 
system with a simple arxJ rela- 
tively inexpensive flush of the 
brake flukf. 

LEO & WALT'S SUNOCO 
shouM be your full 8ervk:e auto 



tern in your car. If you need us to 
took at any system in your car or 
truck, including your brake sys- 
tem, our ASE Certified servtee 
technk:ians have the skills to 
handle it. We also use the 
ALLData CD-Rom based system 
for the very latest in maintenance 
and service bulletins for all makes 
of cars. You'll find us located at 
258 Quincy Ave., E. Braintree 
(781-843-1550). Hours: Mon-Fri 
6am-9pm. Sat 7am-9pm, Sun 
9am-5pm. We are 'A Place Where 
Your Car Can Live Longer. ' 

HINT: When topping off brake 
fluid in the reservoir, make sure 
the replacement fluid is compat- 
ible with the original brake fluid. 
DOTS brake fluki does not mix 
with DOT-5 sUKone fluid, for in- 
stance. 



HoMi Of we ABf( PROP/wi 

(Division of Leo & Walt's SurK)Co) 

BOTTLES FILLED BY THE POUND 

Ho flat rate, you get what you pay fori 




Leo A^WMUSu^ 



a 




It's Sidewalk 
Festival Time 
Pages 1 5-1 8 




WEATHER FORECAST 

Friday: Chance of Showers. 75 ^ 
Saturday: Ch. of Showers, 75-80 ^ 
Sunday: Partly Sunny, 80's ^ , 






Tlie Quincy 



Historic Quinci;'s Hometown Weekly; Newspaper 




VOL. 32 No. 43 



Thursday, July 20, 2000 



A Summer's Day Respite 













■;^r * 



.j^i 



%iLt ^:>7 



%. 



-*4 



. ♦^ *" ..;t*-^-:^:..;.:,]W^'V" 




Wo Need To Rush ' 

McCauley 

Puts Brakes 

On Bonds 

By CRAIG SALTERS 

City Councillor Frank McCauley put the brakes 
on all but one bond issue at Monday night's City 
Council meeting, arguing that only a $300,000 bond 
addressing concerns at the Marshall School merited 
immediate consideration. 






CONSTITUTION COMMON, in front of new City Hall, with esque and relaxing spot to catch up on a little reading on a 
its beautiful Howers and "Walk of Names" makes a pictur- summer's day. (Maralin Manning Photo) 



Pinnacle Crashes Into Classroom Pupils Just Left 

Lightning Hits Bethany Church, 
Causes Over $100,000 Damage 



A lightning bolt hit Beth- 
any Congregational Church, 
Spear and Coddington Sts., 
Ouincy Center, during 
Thursday afternoon's thun- 
derstorm, causing more than 
$100,000 in damage, offi- 
cials said. 

A 600-pound chunk of a 
solid concrete pinnacle on 
the steeple was sent crash- 
ing down inside the church 
into the classrooms of the 
Montessori School for Early 
Learning, leaving a four 
foot by four foot hole in the 
roof above. 

Fortunately, the students 
had left a short time earlier, 
said Fire Chief Thomas 



Gorman. 

The pinnacle destroyed 
the classroom and caused 
damage one floor below to 
the Ouincy Teen Mothers 
program where empty cribs 
lay pushed against the wall. 

Again, fortunately, there 
were no mothers or children 
there at the time. 

Rev. William Harding, 
pastor, said, "It's just an 
absolute blessing that no 
one was hurt. God was truly 
with us." 

There was extensive wa- 
ter damage caused by rain 
cascading through numerous 
holes left in the church's 
battered roof, another victim 



of the shattered pinnacle. 

There was at least three 
inches of water in the base- 
ment. 

"It's not just one place; 
it's everywhere," Harding 
said after surveying the 
damage. "This is going to 
cost a fortune to repair." 

"The whole side of the 
building just lit up," said 
one frazzled parishioner 
who had witnessed the 
lightning bolt. "I thought a 
bomb had gone off, and 
people were screaming." 

Later, when inspecting 
the hole left by the 600- 
pound chunk, the same pa- 
rishioner chuckled softly 



and said, "It's like someone 
threw a VW Bug through 

our roof. Thank God the 
gargoyles were protecting 
us." 

Although Harding esti- 
mated there were at least 15 
people in the church at the 
time of the lightning bolt, 
there were no injuries re- 
ported. 

The church, Harding 
said, has spent roughly 
$800,000 the past five years 
re-pointing its tower and 
repairing its roof. 

The Bethany Steeple, one 
of the highest points in 
Quincy Center, is 120 feet 
tall. 



That particular issue will 
be discussed Sept. 5 at a 7 
p.m. meeting of the Finance 
Committee, of which 
McCauley is chairman, 
complete with an update by 
Councillor Daniel Ray- 
mondi on progress solving 
traffic and congestion 
problems at the elementary 
school on Moody St. 

"There's no need to rush 
through this," McCauley 
said of the bond issues, ex- 
plaining that he was not 
opposed to any item per se 
but that his objections sim- 
ply gave him "more time to 
sit down with (Auditor) Mi- 
chael McFarland and under- 
stand these issues better." 

McCauley did add, how- 
ever, that "the prioritization 
has got to start somewhere." 

McCauley's parliamen- 
tary objections, which 
automaticallv tabled the 
remaining four bond issues 



totaling $1.7 million until 
the council's next meeting 
Sept. 5, came as no surprise 
to Mayor Sheets or to City 
Auditor Michael 

NfeFarland, who both 
agreed that the Marshall 
School situation was the 
only truly time-sensitive 
concern. 

"The Marshall School is 
the only item which presents 
a time-frame problem," 
Sheets said of the conges- 
tion issues there. "We want 
to solve that problem before 
the start of the school year." 

McFarland, who at Mon- 
day night's meeting pre- 
sented a 10-year bond plan 
for the city factoring in ex- 
isting commitments with 
possible bond obligations, 
said a Sept. 5 date allowed 
more than enough time to 
discuss the bond issues and 
(Cont'd On Page 32) 



10- Year Bonding 
Plan Submitted 
To City Council 



Grass Clippings Pick-Up 
Remains A Hot Issue 



As the summer heats up, the city. pick-up per month, though 

the ong(Mng debate over the Or so say city councillors better than nothing, simply 
disposal of grass clippings whose constituents have isn't enough to do the job. 
and yard waste becomes been calling and complain- "This will probably go 
mor« aii'tf 4ii«ie'an isem «i * «»g ^'thal -the »DP^i9 kkk* • doiMn ^s«the» is6H««a£ tlM 



summer," declared Ward 3 
Councillor Patrick McDer- 
mott, who hailed the city's 
DPW as a state model for 
.^„4C(mtldOnPage2) .. 



City Auditor Michael 
McFarland submitted an 
updated 10-year bonding 
plan to the City Council 
Monday night which calls 
for a 10-year proposed debt 
schedule totaling 

$104,100,000. 

The plan factors in ex- 
isting debt obligations and 
$88 million in unbonded but 
committed obligations for a 
new Ouincy High School 
($54 million), new Central 
Middle School ($24 mil- 
lion), and a renovated Ster- 
ling Middle School ($10 
million), which are slated 
for opening in the falls of 
2004, 2006, and 2007, re- 
spectively. 



Those three school proj- 
ects, McFarland empha- 
sized, will eventually re- 
ceive 63 percent reim- 
bursements from the state. 
In fact, McFarland noted, 
the state is already reim- 
bursing the city roughly 
$930,000 for construction 
work at the Marshall, Ber- 
nazzani, Parker, and 
Beechwood Knoll Schools, 
with an additional $336,000 
reimbursement expected 
next year for construction at 
Point Webster Elementary 
School. 

Outside the city's major 
obligations, an additional 
$17.1 million in anticipated 
(Cont'd On Page 11) . 



Tlwnilqr, Jaly 21, MM 




Grass Clippings Pick-Up 
The Issue Of The Summer' 



A WREATH tmm tht White Houe w«i placed oa the tomb of Joka Q« Mcy ^ ^ 

■y bst week itf FInt P«ri»li Ckarck, abo kaowa ai •Cfcarch of tke Preridcats.'* Tke 



I 



wnath faiyiag ccf«m»ay aarkcd tke 233rd birtkday aaajrenary of Joka Qaiacy Adam, 
siztk Presideat of tke Uaited States. Fro* left are: OMamaMler Ckaries Wcisaaa, 
CoMaaadiag Officer, Naval Reserre Ceater Qaiacy, represeatiag Presidcat WUiaai 
Jcflienoa Ciatoa; Mayor JaMS Skeets; City Coaacil Preaideat Paal HaroM. saperriaorof 
tke AdaM Teazle aad Sckooi FVmd; Rer. Sk el doa Beaactt, PkJ)., ■iaiiHr of Firrt Pari* 
Ckarck; Edward ntirndd. PkJ)., director of Qaiacy ffirtorical Sodetr. -^l EMI Skaae 
^tf^rfn. (Presidiential Camera Photo/DanCoMMm) 

Newton Resolve Keeps Tabs 
On Tattoo Legislation 



Ward 6 Councillor Jo- 
seph Newton sponsored a 
resolve at Monday night's 
council meeting requesting 
Mayor James Sheets to form 
a committee to inform and 
educate Quincy residents 
about a bill pending before 
the State Legislature which 
would legalize tattooing in 



the state. 

Newton said the resec- 
tion, which passed unani- 
mously and was referred to 
both the mayor and City 
Solicitor Stephen McGrath, 
is an attempt to malce resi- 
dents aware of the issue, pro 
or con, and give the city 
some control over zoning 



and public health 

Ward 3 Councillor Pat- 
rick McDermcm voiced his 
support of the resolve, add- 
ing that the matter was also 
before the State Supreme 
Judicial Court and a deci- 
sion on the issue could 
come as early as this fall. 



(Cont'd From Page 1) 

recycling but joined a cho- 
rus of his colleagues in re- 
questing a solution to this, 
literally, growing problem. 

The councillors voiced 
their di^leasure on the is- 
sue as part of an 8-0 positive 
vote oo a joint resolve byi 
Councillors JosefA Newton 
and Stephen Durkin re- 
questing the Public Works 
Conunittee to work with the 
DPW to come up with a 
better policy on grass clip- 
pings. 

Newton himself brought 
in dose to 60U signatures 
from residents asking for 
assistance (» the issue and 
said there were still more 
signatures to ccMne. ■> 

The resolve was sent to 
said conomittee and will be 
discussed in early August 
with the hopes of solving 
the proUem for next year. 

Meanwhile, councillors 
say, residents are up in arms 
about BFI's decision this 
^ring to stop picking up 
yardwaste for disposal, a 





OscoDrua 

475 Hancock St, North Quincy 

# 

Meeting the grocery 
needs of Wollaston 
& North Quincy . . . 
Now that's a real victory! 

This weeks FOODMAKT specials 






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SUNDAY BREAKFAST SPECIAL 

4 for $5 

• I dozen large eggs • I quart cjYlest Lynn Orange Juice 

• I gallon of Wesf Lynn Milk (1%, 2% or fat free) 

• Your Chmcec^ the Boston Glotfe or Hendd 



A 



Of^r 



,7J23m0^ 



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Your Osco in North Quinof, a one-stop store 
committed to your neighborhood. 

(mis. Electric and Phone Bills also accepted. (Mon-Fri Sam-Spm) 



policy mandated by the De- 
partment of Environmental 
Protection (DEP) for almost 
10 years but only recently 
enforced. 

"This is not a proper way 
to encourage people to recy- 
cle," Councillor Daniel 
Raymondi said of the 
DPW's request that resi- 
dents haul their clippings 
down to its site off Sea St. 

"If everyone in this city re- 
cycled their grass clippings, 
we would have, not a 
nightmare of Elm St., but a 
nightmare on Sea St." 

Raymondi, who first 
brought up the potential 
problems of DPW policy at 
a Jun& council meeting, 
agreed with fellow council- 
lors Newton and McDer- 
mott that once a month was 
"inadequate" and was both a 
neighborhood blight prob- 
lem and a health issue. 

Speaking practically, 

Sabrina Sweeney 

Sabrina Sweeney of 
Quincy, a member of the 
class of 2000 at Providence 



Raymondi urged Lestei 
Gerry, the DPW's directoi 
of Building and Construe 
tion managemeilrt, whc 
spoke on the issue, to at 
least consider better signage 
for the DPW so th^ resi- 
dents would be able to lo 
cate it more easily. 

Gerry, who said it costs 
the city $2^,000 for each 
additional week B¥l collects 
yardwaste, said that some 
alternatives, «uch as New 
ton's suggesOon of summei 
help led t^ an experienced 
DPW driver, wctc not feasi- 
ble (in that instance, be- 
cause of the cost of a tmck] 
but that other options, such 
as letting all vendors, in- 
cluding BFI, bid for a con- 
tract, were being explored. 

Gerry also said that those 
residents unable to make the 
trip to Sea St. could call the 
DPW offices and their clip- 
pings would be picked up 
by DPW crews. 

In Honor Society 

Kappa Alpha Italian Honor 
Society. 

Sweeney is an elemen- 



College, recently was in- tary/special education major 
ducted into the Gamma at the college. 




by Tony CentorifK), Kevin ycGfDirty and BH Starfcie 

t. DRIVING AMBITIONS 

An estimated one-third of all while moving and hawe a low 

new vehicles offers a four- range for ol^oad. 
wheel-drive option. The all- LEO & WALTS SUNOCO 

wheel-drive (AWD) offered on invites your inquiries about most 

some sedans, wagons, anytf>ing connected with the 

minivans arxj SUVs distributes care of your car. Our ASECer- 

power to all four wheels ac- tified service technicians are 

cording to driving conditions, highly sW ied so they can do 

Unlike 4WD, AWD lacks a tow everything neces sa ry to keep 

range ttwt permits real off- your car in exoelent running 

roading. The permanent 4WD conditk>n wfielher J^ means 

on some SUVs has a center son>e(hing simple to complex 

differential with automatic en)^ or four wheel drive sys- 

(un)k)cking for added tractton tern work. We Ye here at 258 

andatowrangeforoff-roadlng. Quincy Ave., E.Braintrae (781 
Selectable full-time 4WD. of- 
fered on some SUVs and pk*- 
ups, altows selectton of 2WD or 



843-1550). M% art 'A Place 
Whf Your Car Can Live 
Longer. 'M%>ayourk)cal source 



fun-time 4WD and Includes a for propane for grills, motor 
tocMng diffarantial and a tow hoa>es and converted vehtoies. 
range. Part-time 4W0. onered HINT: Onrwwf vahfctes m^ 
on most pickups and many nJHrfMi MMipne 4VVD, driv- 
SUVs,aRowsseiectk)nof2WD an imtst lock and unlock the 
or4WDandcanengigeki4WD dm mmU M manuatr 

NoMi Of Tm AeiCPnomii 

(OMaion at Lto a W^r* Sunoco) 
BOTTLES RLLED BY THE POUND 

Mo flaf n(t, you 0t( iWMt you p«K A"^ 

^^^^Lm ft Walt's Seaoeo ■ 



k 



Tr' 



mmt^f 



"uaw. %, 



nmday,Jiily2«,20M 



Quincy After School Child Care 
Receives $1,000 For Ward 2 Use 

Councillor Daniel Ray- ' "The idea is that parents Jo-Ann Bragg, vice 

mondi has donated $1,000 can work without worry," chairwoman of the School ' 

of Ward 2 mitigation funds said Doug Vceder, execu- Committee and business 

to Quincy After School tive director of the program, manager for Quincy After 

Child Care, with funds spe- who added that the pro- School Child Care, said the 

cifically earmarked for gram's day care costs are fact that the programs are 

qualifying Ward 2 families, based on a sliding scale housed within the school 

"This is a great service," based on a family's ability system streamlines the en-. 

Raymondi said of the pro- to pay. tire process and eliminates 

gram, which provides qual- transportation worries for 

ity after-school day care for The existing budget, parents. "In some respects, 

roughly 300 students per Veeder said, provides for a it's almost, like an extension 

week at eight school sites $50 per week average sub- of the school day," Bragg 

across the city. "We want to sidy for families, but Veeder said, 

continue to support services said the program now wants , ^ . 

to help single mothers or to reach out to members of 

young parents work and the Quincy community to 

care for their families." provide increased offsets of 

With the exception of the day care costs. 



Ward 2 designation, Ray- 
mondi said, the donation 
will do the same as all do- 
nations to the QASCC 
scholarship fund: subsidize 



Veeder said all con- 
tributors will receive a 
thank-you letter suitable for 
framing and have their name 



Bragg added that the 
program will soon add a 
ninth child care site at the 
Wollaston Elementary 
School. 

Mitigation funds are 
funds paid by developers 
and other companies to 
compensate an area for such 




the ever-increasing cost of placed on a contributors' problems as increased traf- 

day care to provide options "Wall of Fame" at the fie, truck volume, noise, or 

and opportunities to the QASCC's newly renovated other neighborhood disrup- 

families who need it most. offices. tions. 

New Law Raises Bingo 
Prize Limit To $3,000 



WARD 2 COUNCILLOR Daniel Raymondi (left) recently presented $1,000 in mitigation 
ftinds to Quincy After School Child Care to offset tuition costs for deserving parents of the 
Ward 2 community. Accepting the donation on behalf of QASCC are Jo-Ann Bragg, vice 
chairwoman of the School Committee and business manager for QASCC, and Doug Veeder, 
its executive director. (Quincy Sun Photo) 



SCRAPBOOKING STORE 



A complete range of high quality acid- 
free scrapbook supplies 



Let us help you preserve 
yoir precious memories 



A law designed to in- The new law includes 

crease the viability of local three major initiatives: Hrst, 

Bingo games was passed it increases prizes to include 

recently by the Legislature. progressive games with 

The law, said State Rep. payouts of up to $3,000, an 

Stephen Tobin and State increase from the current 
Treasurer Shannon O'Brien, 
chairwoman of the Lottery 

Commission, makes three people eligible to be volun 



steady declines since 1992, 
when $243 million in reve- 
nue was generated by 
144,623 plays per week at 
763 licensed organizations. 
In 1999, those figures 
$500 maximum; second, it dropped to 87,000 plays at 
allows for a larger pool of ^^^ organizations, generat 



major changes, the most 
notable of which is increas- 
ing the prizes that can be 
offered, with a maximum 
progressive pfiyout of 
$3,000.^ 



teer workers at Bingo 
events; and third, it allows 
broader discretion in the use 
of charitable gaming tickets. 
"This new law represents 
a sound compromise be- 



ing only $156.5 million. 

The law is the first sig- 
nificant change to Bingo 
laws in the Commonwealth 
in over 20 years. 



Strap-Hinge Albums 

Lxirge selection of 12 x 12 Paper 


' Phone: 617-376-8869 
Fax: 617-376-8281 


Stickers & Die-Cuts 


Hours: 




Tue, Wed, Fri 10 - 5 


Journaling denies 


Thursday 10-9 


and much more... 


Saturday 10 - 3 


^MmoRiriANi 


I 18 Saville Avenue 
' Quincy, AAA 02169 



>..*. ^ ^.^k..*...^ (Parking entrance 17 Huntley Road) 

Sign i^ now for Scrapbooking Cbsses and All-Day Workshops 



"I am delighted to have tween the concerns of Binga 

supported this important advocates, industry experts, 

legislation so that our local and the Legislature and 

Bmgo games and the causes should provide a necessary 

they support have this im- lifeHne to a struggling in- 

portant fundraising tool," stitution," said O'Brien, 

said Tobm. "Increasing "Bingo is part of the fabric 

prizes and reducing unnec- of many of the communities 

essary restrictions should in this state, and I appreciate 

help this area's charitable the Legislature's support in 

institutions not only raise providing the Lottery with 

money, but restore Bingo as the tools necessary to return 

a traditional community it to viability." 
event." Bingo has experienced 




"I just want 
a simple checking account 

that doesn't cost 
an arm & a leg!" 



by George P. Murphy 



As heard on WJDA Radio, 1300 AM every Hiursday at 11:00am! 

LET TAHITI lANTIUZE YOU 

lUiiti and her islands promise an tionai Tahitian wedding ceremony, 
unfoigettable travel destination. Re- What are you seeking for your next 
gardless of whicb island is your fi- advenhire? The romance of a South Pa- 
nal destinatioii, you will first land in cificgeUway?Tbenostalgiaof Europe's 
Tahiti. Enjoy the capital city of past or the excitement of it's present? 
Papeete, especially downtown near How about a relaxing, sun-and-fiui filled 
die harbor, one oftfae South Pacific's Caribbean cruise? Whatever part of the 
busiest. Several museums are worth- world beckons you, see PRIME 
while, partioilarly the Pearl Museum TRAVEL first. Whether you're going 
featuring infbnnation and exhibits across die country or around the world, 
about Tahiti's largest and most good planning can make the trip 
unique export, the black peari. Tour smoother, mote relaxing, unfoigettable. 
lUiiti and her islands any way you After all, isn't that what you're searcfa- 
like-bybus,helicopler,jeepor^ass ing for in your travel experiences? Call 
bottom boat. Whedier you choose to us at 500 Victory 
dive into the music, dance and cui- Road, Marina Bay 
sine of the Polynesian culture, or hide (617-472-3697). 
away on a secluded island, lUiiti has P.S.TahitiisaT"'** 
an island you will love. For true ro- hour flight from Los 
mance, renew your love in a tradi- Angeles. 




S^Sa 



NOW Checking 

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Big banks claim they want your 
business, but the way they charge 
and the way they behave have to 
make you wonder. At Colonial 
Federal, we treat customers right. 
We make it easy for you to get your 
checking account with no monthly fee. Our savings & CD rates apply 
equally to new & current customers. And, unlike big banks, we don't 
hide bad news in the small print or make you open multiple accounts. 
Our offers are straightforward and easy-to-understand because we want 
you to be happy doing business with us. It s that simple. Had it with big 
banks? You do have a choice! Come see us. Or call 617-471-0750. 




» 



M 



COLONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK 

QUINCY: 15 Beach St., next to Wollaston Post Office 617-471-0750 

EAST WEYMOUTH: Corner of Middle & Washington Sts., next to Stop& Shop 781-331-1776 

HOLBROOK: 802 South Franklin St., next to Stop & Shop 781-767-1 776 

Colonial Federal is the independent, neighborhood bank you've been looking for. 

We can't be uken over or forced into a hostile merger, which means customers - not stockhokien - 

come first with us! And that^ the wav it's been since 1888. 



Infurad FOIC 



^ 



Page 4 Tl&e Qulnoy Sun Thursday, July 20, 2000 



Cl^lNICN 




USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co. Inc. 

1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. Publisher 

Robert H. Bosworth Editor 

35« per copy. $16.00 per year by mail in Quincy 
$18.00 per year by mail outside Quincy. $22.00 out of state. 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Periodicals postage paid at Boston, MA 

Postmaster Send address change to 

The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy MA 02169 

The Quincy Sun assumes no financial responsibility fof typographical errors in 
advertisements but will reprint that part of an advertisernent In which the lypograpfiical 
error occurs. 



Health Department, 
Rent Grievance, Asian 
Outreach Offices Relocate 



The City of Quincy's 
Health Department, Rent 
Grievance and Asian Out- 
reach Offices have relocated 
to 1585 Hancock St., lower 
level. 

The new offices are 
across the hall from the 
city's Plumbing and Wiring 
Department. The Building, 
Conservation. Zoning and 



Weights and Measures De- 
partments are located on the 
third floor of this building. 

Mayor James Sheets will 
join the staff of the Health, 
Rent Grievance and Asian 
Outreach Departments to 
officially open their new 
offices today (Thursday) 
July 13 from 9 to 10:30 a.m. 



Houghs Neck 
Center Activities 

Houghs Neck Commu- Tuesday, 1 to 2:30 p.m. 
nity Center, 1193 Sea St., • Senior Bingo Monday 

Quincy, announces its ac- and Wednesday, 1 to 3 p.m. 
tivities. • Computer Classes 

• Senior lunch served Thursday and Saturday. 
Monday through Friday, • Children's Art Classes. 
11:30 a.m. For more information, 

• Senior line dancing call 376-1385. 

THE mSTORY CHANNEL 

On July 19, 1799, during French Gen. Napoleon 
Bonaparte's Egyptian campaign, a group of his soldiers dis- 
covered a black basalt slab inscribed with ancient writing 
near the town of Rosetia, north of Alexandria. It became 
known as the "Rosetia Stone" and was inscribed by priests 
of Ptolemy V with an identical text in Egyptian hieroglyph- 
ic, demotic and Greek, thus holding the key to solving the 
riddle of hieroglyphics. ... On July 19, 1848, at the Wesleyan 
chapel in Seneca Falls, N.Y., the Woman's Rights 
Convention — the first of its kind ever held in the United 
States — conunenccd wiil> almost 200 women in atten- 
dance. ... On July 23, 1903. The Ford Motor Company sold 
its first auto, a Model A that Henry Ford himself designed. 
... On July 21, 1925, in Dayton, Tenn., the so-called 
"Monkey Trial" ended with John Thomas Scopes convicted 
of teaching evolution in violation of Tennessee law. Scopes 
was ordered to pay a fine of $100, the minimum that the law 
allowed. ... On July 22, 1933, Just before midnight, 
American aviator Mlcy Post completed the first solo 
around-the-world flight when he returned to Floyd Bennett 
Field in New York after seven days, 18 hours and 49 min- 
utes. ... On July 21, 1949, by a vote of 82 to 13, the U.S. 
Senate authorized U.S. participation in the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization (NATO) and allocated funds to be used 
toward the estabUshment of the military alliance. ... On July 
17, 1955, Disneyland, Walt Disney's amusement metropolis, 
(^ned. It covered 160 acres of Anaheim, Calif, and cost 
$17 million to build. ... On July 18, 1969, shortly after Icav- 
. ing a party on Chappaquiddick Island, Sen. Edward M. 
Kennedy of Massachusetts was driving with a companion 
when he took a sharp right turn off the paved road and 
plunged off the narrow Dike Bridge into a pond. Kennedy 
managed to escape the automobile, but his passenger, Mary 
Jo Kopechne, drowned. ... On July 20, 1976, on the seventh 
anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing, the Viking 1 lan- 
der, an unmanned U.S. planetairy probe, became the first 
spacecraft to successfully land on the surface of Mars. 

e 20U0 Kiag Features Syod., Ik. 




King Gaorgs I of England was a nativa of Germany 
wlM> could not apaak Engliah. Ha communicated with 
, cabinet In French. 





By Henry Bosworth 



A Short Ballot (Really Short!) 



This year's primary election ballot may be the short- 
est one ever. 

Just one contest ~ with just three candidates. 

That's all folks. 

No state senate or state representative contests. Or 
anything else. 

The Norfolk County Register of Deeds race to suc- 
ceed Barry Hannon who is stepping down after 30 
years, will be the only political show in town Sept. 19, 

The three candidates on the ballot-all Democrats: 

City council President Paul Harold, Mary Ellen 




CRONIN 



COLLINS 



Cronin, vice chairman of the Quincy Zoning Board of 
Appeals, and County Commissioner Peter Collins of 
Milton. 

The winner will face Bruce Olsen of Stoughton, the 
only Republican seeking the job and thus gets a free 
primary ride to November. 

Missing from the ballot are such names as state Sena- 
tor Michael 
Morrissey and 
state Reps. 
Bruce Ayers, 
Ron Mariano 
and Steve 
Tobin. 

They have 
no opposition, 
Democrat or 
Republican, 
which means 
they are as- 
sured of keep- 
ing their Bea- 
con Hill seats 
unless a write- 
in or sticker 

candidate turns up with a pocketful or two of miracles. 
Also missing will be County Commissioners John 

Gillis, former 
city clerk, and 
William 
O'Donnell of 
Norwood, 
both Demo- 




SHEA 




f 

MARL\NO 



TOBIN 





GILLIS 



O'DONNELL 



8 Countdown weeks to 

THE MARIE CURRY WALK Sept. 17 

'Hey, I'm Still livingl That means God's 

not through with me yet.' 

-Betty Laural Channell 




WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



American Heart 
Association^ 







crats running for re-election without opposition. 

No primary action for the County Clerk of Courts 
post Nicolas Barbadoro is leaving after 19 years. 

But Democrat Walter Tihiilty of Milton, Barbadoro's 
assistant, and Daniel Dewey of Sonoma Rd., Squantum, 
chairmanof the Quincy Republican City Committee 
will square off in November. 

No primary contest for the 10th Congressional seat. 
Quincy Democrat incumbent William Delahuntand his 
Republican challenger, Erick Bleiken of South 
Yarmouth, formerly of Hingham, will go at it in No- 
vember. 

So, with only one contest and three candidates Sept. 
19, does the city get to save a few election bucks? 

"No," says City Clerk Joseph Shea. "We still have 
to have the same number of poll 
workers, and the same number of 
police to watch and bring in the bal- 
lot boxes." 

And, he notes, there still has to 
be as many ballots printed as there 
are registered voters in case that 
miracle election day arrives when 
every single registered voter in town 
actually votes. 

Quincy has 51,656 registered voters as of the latest 
count and could pick up a few more before the Aug. 30 
deadline for registering for the Sept. 19 primary. 

So there will be least 51,656 ballots ready that day. 

And what is the price tag on this one-contest, three 
name election going to be? 

"About the same as any primary election open to 
voters city-wide," says Shea. "About $50,0(K)." 

And what kind of a voter turnout can be expected 
for this one? 

"I would like to see 20 percent," says Shea. "But at 
this point I'm not even going to try to predict what it 
will actually be." 

Some observers think it could dip close to the single 
digit area. 

It apparently will be up to the three candidates them- 
selves to generate voter interest in the next few weeks 
or the turnout could be the lightest ever. 

And the results the quickest ever. 

□ 
MAYOR JAMES SHEETS has a new private sec- 
retary. 

Joan Pritchard succeeds Lisa 
Barry who is moving to San Fran- 
cisco. 

Lisa had replaced Kerry Knapp 
who now is assistant to the mayor, 
succeeding Helen Murphy who re- 
cently decided to seek new career 
opportunities. 
Joan comes well prepared. 
She was with the Quincy Housing Authority eight 
years as administrative secretary and affirmative ac- 
tion officer under past Executive Director John (Jake) 
Comer and present Executive Director Jack Mather. 

And how does she like the new job and new scen- 
ery? 

"Love it," she beams. 

Q 

SENATOR Michael Morrissey has a "Land Cruise" 
fundraiser coming up Thursday, July 27, 6 to 8 p.m. at 
the Water Works, Marina Bay. Featuring a suminer- 
time cookout and entertainment by the "Fat City Band." 
Donation $20 per person. 




PRITCHARD 



ttmminimmV(tmmmmmimn^m»fimvi»Ktfim^t^iMMikvuthmm 






mmm 



Thursday, July 20, 2000 Tl&e Quinesr Svu& Page 5 



Scenes From Yesterday 




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THIS POSTCARD is a view of the beach looking south when this postcard was mailed from the old Midland 

from the pier at Harvey's Landing in Hough's Neck. Hotel. All the buildings around the Canoe Club have 

Harvey's rented boats like those in the foreground for been damaged some by storms over the years but every 

over 60 years. In the center of the picture is the Canoe thing else in this view is pretty much the same. 
Club, which was a popular tourist site in the thirties From the Collection of Tom Galvin 



Ri:\i)i:rs Forum 



July 20-27 

1953 

47 Years Ago 



Medals Of Honor 



Editor, TTte Quincy Sun: 
On C-Span after the open- 
ing of the D-Day Museum in 
New Orleans, I watched 
President Clinton at 10:45 
p.m. present M^als of Honor 
to various veterans of their 
relatives. 

Prior to the presentation 
to each recipient, a man to 
the rear of the President be- 
gan reading the accomplish- 
ments of each veteran of the 
famous 442nd Regimental 
Combat Team. Some of the 
accomplishments sounded 
very similar and there were 



no records to substantiate the 
claims. All records prior to 
1973 at the Record Center 
were destroyed by fire in St. 
Louis. 

No mention was made of 
any decorations they were 
previously awarded until 
Senator Daniel Inouye, then 
a captain, approached the 
President. At that time, the 
man in the rear stated that 
Capt. Inouye received a 
Purple Heart, a Silver Star 
and a Distinguished Service 
Cross — he deserved it be- 
cause he lost an arm. 



I helped train the men of 
the lOOtii Battalion in Camp 
Shelby, MS, and they were 
good soldiers, but they never 
fought in France. They fought 
in Italy, especially at Monte 
Cassino where they suffered 
heavy casualties. For any 
medal to be awarded, a Gen- 
eral Order must be issued. 

I remember Saburo 
Tanamachi when in the 
States. I also remember Dan 
Inouye. 

Now take the case of 
James Cadigan of Hingham 
who was denied the Medal of 



Honor by Secretary of the 
Army Caldera after his Com- 
manding Officer, Capt. 
Melvin Mason put him in for 
it. All Cadigan did was pick 
up a machine gun with extra 
ammunition and charged the 
two German machine gun- 
ners, killing them plus an- 
other 55 while 80 more sur- 
rendered to him. Caldera said 
"this was normal for a pla- 
toon leader to do." Is this 
justice? Cadigan was 
wounded at the time. 

Leonard P. Morris 
D-Day Veteran 



Property Owners Have Right To Pave Front Yards 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 
In responding to the letter 
submitted recently by Mr. 
Greg Newton, I would first 
like to commend Mr. New- 
ton on his pride and admira- 
tion of our fine city. I, in- 
deed, share in this sentiment 
and am proud of the neat and 
trim appearance of my land- 
scaping. Where we partcom- 
pany, however, is in our ap- 
proach to the "yard-paving" 
issue. 

To read the reports on the 
debate of this issue is to be 
both amused and horrified. 



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In analyzing this or any issue 
of public policy, it is impor- 
tant to argue at the funda- 
mental level. This is to say 
that we must be diligent in 
our resistance to the natural 
tendencies to argue the "emo- 
tional" case. Arguments of 
emotion, of practicality, of 
what "looks good," of what 
"feels good," or, of what costs 
less, are not necessarily ar- 
guments that advocate for our 
best interests. They are cer- 
tainly the easier arguments 
to make, however. 

At the core of this debate 



are the rights of private prop- 
erty owners to install a pav- 
ing material on what is the 
front area of their property. 
Furthermore, Councillors 
McDermott and Raymond! 
are asking if these property 
tax paying citizens of Quincy 
should be permitted to allow 
to rest on this surface their 
privately owned and regis- 
tered automobile. 

The notion that a govern- 
ment is permitted to enact 
legislation mandating that 
one may not place one's au- 
tomobile on a certain portion 



of their property, particularly 
if that portion is surfaced with 
pavement, is truly a frighten- 
ing prospect. Wouldn't this 
sort of socialistic government 
activity more readily drive 
people away from our city, 
Mr. Newton? I suggest that 
you, along with Councillors 
McDermott and Raymondi, 
shift your concern towards 
advocating for personal free- 
dom and liberty first and com- 
munity aesthetics, second. 

Mike Denaro 
West Squantum St. 



■ ■■■■■ SUBSCRIPTION FORM ■■■■■■ 

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1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



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[ ] 1 YEAR IN QUINCY $16.00 

[ ] 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY $18.00 [ ] CHECK ENCLOSED 
[ ]1 YEAR OUT OF STATE $22.00 [ ] PLEASE BILL ME 



Quincy's 
Yesterdays 

Construction 
On Hancock 
Parking Area 

By PAUL HAROLD 

The first phase of construction began on the John Hancock 
parking area this week with the $32,000 rechanneiling and 
covering of the Town Brook. ^^^_^^^_^^__ 

The Duane wrecking company 
was removing the last three build- 
ings on the site as the city council 
approved the taking of the last 
properties. 

Public Works Commissioner 

Charles Herbert expected that the lot could be paved before 

the cold weather set in. He asked for the cooperation of 

motorists not to park in the area during the construction phase. 

GROSSMAN STRIKE NEAR END 

It was expected that the month-long strike against 
Grossman's and 29 other lumber dealers in the northeast, 
would end this week. Major areas of disagreement were re- 
solved with only three minor issues still in contention. 

The major agreements involved a wage increase of nine 
cents an hour and the payment of time and a half on Satur- 
days and holidays. 

Federal mediator John Sullivan of Quincy had called for 
a meeting of company and union officials to wrap up the last 
outstanding issues. 

NO FRAUD IN REMICK'S STOCK SALE 

Norfolk Probate Judge James Reynolds ruled there was 
no fraud in the sale of Remick's company stock between 
Edith Reynolds and her brother Frank Remick. 

The Remicks' company was part of the estate of Alfred 
Remick, with both Edith Reynolds and Frank Remick as 
beneficiaries. Following the purchase of her share of the 
company of her brother, Mrs. Reynolds claimed fraud and 
misrepresentation. The court, however, ruled that there was 
full disclosure concerning the value and operations of the 
company and that the stock was purchased at fair value. 

Paul Reardon was the attorney for his neighbor, Frank 
Remick, 

QUINCY-ISMS 

At a cost of $9,500 the city was fencing traditional swim- 
ming holes because of the safety concern by West Quincy 
parents. Quarries fenced were Field's, Wilde's, Falconer's, 
Galvin's, Saulstein's and Finn's. . . Cliff Canniff was the 
bake master for the Quincy Chamber of Commerce's an- 
nual clambake at the Weymouth Fairgrounds. A record 475 
attended the event, including chamber directors John (Zep) 
Duane, Joseph Grossman, Forrest Neal and Chester Weeden 
and Elmer Fagerlund, president of the Granite Manufactur- 
ers' Association. . . Mrs. Frank Lyons of Shelton Rd. hosted 
36 members of the Peninsula Club at her home. . . King size 
Narragansett sold at Wollaston Wine and Liquors, five for 
$ 1 .00. . . New carillonic bells were donated to Christ Church 
by Dr. F.J. Kenna, in memory of his wife, Emma Wool worth 
Kenna. . . Bob Malvesta, the outstanding pitcher for the 
Quincy Elks, pitched a no-hitter as the Quincy Fraternal All- 
Stars blanked Brockton, 4-0. . . Hannon Insurance of Maple 
St. offered a family plan Polio Insurance for $8 and up. . . 
Rev. Victor Sawyer preached at the summer union services 
in Wollaston, made up of Methodist, Congregational, Bap- 
tist and Unitarian churches. . . Dr. Robert Gilmore was presi- 
dent of the Quincy Kiwanis Club. . . Quincy was under con- 
sideration as the new location for the Navy and Marines 
Reserve Training Center. It had to leave its location at the 
Hingham Ammunition Depot. . . Quincy's major milk com- 
panies delivered envelopes for contributions for the Worces- 
ter tornado fund. The envelopes read, "Give all you can, 
God spared you." . . . Two Houghs Neck dogs won prizes at 
the South County Kennel Club in Narragansett, R.I. Win- 
ners were "Ringtime Rascal" owned by Mr. and Mrs. Lars 
Lundin and "Shelley's Candie" owned by Judy Shelley. . . 
The city's new bloodmobile set a record with die collection 
of 151 pints. The largest number of donors came from the 
Beechwood Knoll section where polio outbreak in Quincy 
was concentrated. Other groups donating were from the New 
England Telephone, Bethlehem Steel, Metropolitan Insur- 
ance, Quincy Electric and Power, the Quincy School De- 
partment, the Jewish War Veterans and Masonic lodges. . 
.At Quincy City Hospital, twins were bom to Mr. and Mrs. 
William Daley of Palmer St. 



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P»ge6 TlM Quiaoy Sun Thimday, July 20« 20M 



^QSkd^!^ 




BY MARIE D'OUMPIO 




tmtmmmmm^tSm 



Swing/Jazz Vocalist 
In Concert At Library 



Stuffed Artichokes With Clams 



Do you ever run out of ideas on what 
to prepare when you're having a hungry 
group over for dinner? After my smart 
shopper husband found some artichokes 
on sale last week, I prepared them a bit 
different, with clams. 

I have to confess, the clams were 
already on the shelf and I wanted to create 
a different stuffing. You can eliminate 
clams, as other ingredients can be added, 
including mushrooms. 

Stuffed Artichokes With Clams 
6 artichokes 

1 can minced clams 

6 slices of bread (soaked in water) 

1/2 cup seasoned bread crumbs 

3 tablespoons tomato sauce 

smidgen of garlic powder 

1/4 cup grated Romano or Parmesan 

cheese 

salt and pepper to taste 

stems of artichokes (cut up after 

boiling) (optional) 

2 tablespoons olive oil 

some extra tomato sauce for bottom of 
the pan 

1 cup water for bottom of the pan. 
Place the artichokes in a large pan 



cover with water and boil until they are a 
darker green (about 10 minutes). 

While they are boiling, soak and 
squeeze the bread Place in a bowl and add 
all the ingredients except the oil. Blend 
until mixture is the consistency of mashed 
potatoes. 

Cool the artichokes, clip the sharp 
edges off the leaves with a scissors, and 
after removing the stems, they should sit 
well in a pan. 

Open the top of each artichokes and 
place the stuffing. I usually place the 
stuffing in each layer of leaves and 
tighten. In a roasting pan, put the water 
and extra sauce on the bottom. 

Arrange the artichokes side by side and 
on top of each, sprinkle a bit of the olive 
oil. Cover and bake in a 350 degree oven 
for about 45 minutes (or until leaves are 
tender). 

You can also cook them on top of the 
stove well covered for about the same 
time. When served, they can either be cut 

in halves or enjoyed as a whole. It may 
sound like a lot of work, but it's worth it if 
you like artichokes as we do. 



Storyteller Guy Peartree At 
Adams Shore Library July 25 



The 14th season of the 
Summer Storytellers Series 
continues on Tuesday, July 
25, at 7 p.m. at the Adams 



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Shore Branch Library, 519 
Sea St., with storyteller Guy 
Peartree. 

Peartree' s return to 
Quincy will feature a pro- 
gram of stories from his 
Cherokee and African- 
American roots including 
such favorites as "Wiley and 
the Hairy Man." 

At the same time a Pa- 
jama Time Storyhour with 
Dottie Moynihan will be 
offered for younger siblings 
accompanied by an adult 
and families with children 
under the age of five. Fish 

and other ocean creatures 
will be the theme. The entire 
group will participate in 



creating a mural of the 
Rainbow Fish. 

Other performers in the 
Summer Storytellers Series 
include: Lauren Carson, 
Aug. 1; Jennifer Smith, 
Aug. 8; and storyteller and 
musician Scott Kepnes, 
Aug. 15. Pajama Time with 

Dottie Moynihan will con- 
tinue on these evenings with 
stories from favorite authors 
such as Marc Brown and 
Eric Carle. 

The programs are spon- 
sored by an LSTA grant 
from the Massachusetts 
Board of Library Commis- 
sioners and a Quincy Arts 
Lottery grant from the Mas- 
sachusetts Cultural Council. 




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Krisanthi Pappas, a 
swing/jazz vocalist accom- 
panied by a jazz combo, will 
perform Thursday, July 27, 
from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 
p.m. on the front lawn of the 
Thomas Crane Public Li- 
brary, Quincy Square. 

Her performance will 
feature popular swing and 
jazz standards, some from 
her favorites George and Ira 
Gershwin and Ella Fitzger- 
ald. Adults and children are 
welcome. 

A full-time entertainer, 
Pappas has performed 
throughout the United States 
and in the Caribbean. Lo- 
cally she's a favorite at two 
of Boston's top jazz clubs. 
Scullers Jazz Club and the 
Regattabar. Her latest CD 
"Krisanthi Pappas - A 
Centennial Tribute to 
George and Ira Gershwin" 
features Herb Pomeroy on 
trumpet and John Payne on 
saxophone, clarinet, and 
flute. Her own rhythm sec- 
tion joins these well known 
musicians. 

The Library's concert 
series continues on Aug. 3 
with guitarist Michael Nix, 
followed Aug. 10 by Inca 
Son playing music of the 
Andes. Concertgoers are 




KRISANTffl PAPPAS 



welcome to bring lawn 
chairs, blankets, and picnics. 
In case of rain the concerts 
will be held at the Adams 
Shore Branch Library, 519 
Sea St., Quincy. Both sites 
are accessible. 



Concerts are free and are 
funded in part by the 
Quincy Cultural Council, a 

local agency supported by 
the Massachusetts Cultural 
Council. 



Civil War Re-enactment At 
Fort Independence July 23 



The Adams National 
Historic Park, Castle Island 
Association and Metropoli- 
tan District Commission 
will host a Civil War re- 
enactment with costumed 
interpreters and historical 
re-enactors Sunday, July 23 
from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m at 
Fort Independence on Castle 
Island, South Boston. 

The public is invited to 
participate in the re- 
enactment which will focus 
on what life was like for 
soldier and civilian before 
and during the American 
Civil War. Participants may 
also meet members of the 



1st Massachusetts Battalion, 
made up of units from the 
1st Massachusetts Cavalry, 
the, 22nd Massachusetts In- 
fantry, and the 54th Massa- 
chusetts Glory Brigade, as 
well as Confederate forces, 
at their camps. 

Festivities for the day 
will include military skir- 



mishes. Civil War era 
games, period music, and kn 
address by President Abra- 
ham Lincoln. 

The program is free of 
charge. For more informa- 
tion, call the Adams Na- 
tional Historical Park Visi- 
tor Center at (617) 770- 
1175. 



*Jazz Easy' At Hancock Park 



The public is invited to 
"Jazz Easy," a five-piece 
band performing on the 
grounds of Hancock Park 
Rehabilitation and Nursing 
Center, 164 Parkingway, 
Quincy, Thursday, July 20 



from 6:15 to 7:15 p.m. 

Light refreshments will 
be served and community 
members are asked to bring 
lawn chairs. In the event of 
rain, listen to WJDA radio 
1300 AM for cancellation. 





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Thunday, July 20, 2000 TIm Quiaoy Sun Page? 



SCCIAL 




Robert, Gloria Noble Celebrate 
50th Wedding Anniversary 



THE CITY OF PRESIDENTS Chapter of the AARP recently installed new officere in this its 
15th annivenary year. Members from left are: Marie Lucier; Frances Adams; Eleanor 
Burrell, treasorer; Rose Kyller, Normand Goyette, president; Robert Dobble; Cari Johnson, 
assistant treasurer; Eleanor Reidy; Eleanor Serafini, secretary; Ruth Dobbic; and Martha 
Robinson. Missing finom photo are Arloa Webber, vice president, and Mary "Kay" BamfoiYl. 
(Quincy Sun Photo) 

St. Mary's School 
Scholarship Winners 



St. Mary's School of 
West Quincy announces the 
following scholarship re- 
cipients for the Class of 
2000 and the secondary 
Catholic High Schools they 
will attend., 

The Ave Maria Council 
- Rev. Cornelius J. Dono- 
van Scholarship was 
awarded to Ryan Quinn, 
who will attend Boston 



The FrincipaFs Schol- 
arship was awarded to 
Sarah Kelly, who will attend 
Cardinal Spellman High 
School. 

Arthur Sweeney Me- 



School. 

St. Mary PTO Scholar- 
ship recipients were: Beth- 
any Davis, Mt. St. Joseph 
Academy; Maria Cattaneo, 
Archbishop Williams High 



morial Scholarship recipi- School; Tyler Lagrotteria, 
ents were: Michael 
Bandera, Archbishop W'il- 
liams High School; Brittany 
Davis; Mt. St. Joseph Acad- 
emy; and Regina Reardon, 



Catholic Mejmorial High 
School; and Nicholas Leger, 
Boston College High 
School. 

John J. Cattaneo III 



College High School. 

QHS Alumni Assn. 

Seeking Class 

Contact Names 



Archbishop Williams High Scholarship recipients 

were: Kyle O'Brien, 
Catholic Memorial High 



^ The Friends of Quincy 
High School Alumni Asso- 
ciation is seeking contact 
people for a number of the 
high school classes. 
The classes are: 

1938 through 1943, 1946 
through 1948, 1950 through 
1953, 1958, 1960, 1961, 
1964, 1965, 1967, 1975, 
1978, 1980 through 1984, 
1986 through 1988, and 



1990. 

Those with information 
are asked to contact JoAnn 
Potter at (617) 773-5626. 



School; Dan O'Donnell, 
Boston College High 
School; Monica Whalen, 
Cardinal Spellman High 
School; and Anthony 
DiPietro, Archbishop Wil- 
liams High School. 



Most of the original 
wedding party were on hand 
to help Robert and Gloria 
Noble celebrate their 50th 
wedding anniversary at the 
Gazebo, Best Western 
Adams Inn, North Quincy. 

Several of the old friends 
in attendance the Nobles 
had not seen for many years 
and some traveled from out 
of state to join them at the 
celebration. 

Also in attendance were 
the Nobles' children, family 
and friends from the Quincy 
Christmas Festival Com- 
mittee, American Ex-POW, 
Wollaston Mothers Club, 
Quincy Access TV, and 
Maria Droste Services 

The Nobles are parents 
of four children, Roberl No- 
ble Jr., Alicia Gardner, 
Nancy McLaughlin and An- 
drea White. They have 10 
grandchildren and one great 
grandchild. 

Members of the 1950 
wedding party included: 
Maid of Honor Alicia 
(Dunn) Coletti, sister of the 
bride; Bridesmaids Marie 
(Noble) Stapleton, sister of 
the groom; Adrienne 
(Dillon) Mattaliano, cousin 
of the bride; and Josephine 
(Fitzgerald) Noble and 
Phyllis (Murphy) Gooden. 

Also Best Man Paul E. 
Noble, brother of the 
groom; Ushers John Ma- 
honey, brother-in-law of the 
bride; John P. Roche, John 
Gallagher, and John B. 
Powers. Mahoney and Pow- 
ers are deceased. 




GLORIA and ROBERT NOBLE 



Mr. and Mrs. Noble were 
honored by the Quincy 
Jewish War Veterans Post 
as its Citizens of the Year in 
1997 for their community 
service. They were also 
honored by the Quincy City 
Democratic Committee in 

1999 as recipients of The 
Dennis F. Ryan Award for 
their service to the Demo- 
cratic Party. 

Mr. Noble is currently 
the senior vice commander. 
Department of Massachu- 
setts, American Ex- 



Prisoners of War. 

Mr. Noble is also a pho- 
tographer for The Quincy 
Sun. 

Mrs. Noble is currently 
on the board of advisors of 
the Good Shepherd Maria 
Droste Agency. 



We need you. 



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AssodadonJ 

WE'RE FIGHTING FOR YOUR LIFE 



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Page 8 Tbe Qulnoy Sun Thursday, July 20, 2000 




THESE 21 NQHS Freshmen, led by Faculty Advisors Kipp Caldwell (left) and Ron'Erikson 
(right), volunteered their time and effort in Bridgeport, CT, as part of a two-day Habitat For 
Humanity project. Students, from front row left, are: Richard Lee, David Dao, Kurt Nason, 
Norman Yuen, Elizabeth Favorito, Caitlin Slowe, Gregg Minezzi, and Frances Chow. Second 
row left are: Clive Chung, Kaite Mo, Christine Cheong, Nina Nguyen, Romina Espinola, and 
Julia Nguyen. Back row left are: Nicole Johnson, Sine Callanan, Joe Ngo, Michael Yu, John 
Ngo, Nancy Yankun, and Lori Ferris. 



THIS 100-FOOT FENCE was built courtesy of the time and effort of 21 North Quincy High 
School ft-eshmen, who volunteered for the Habitat For Humanity project in Bridgeport, CT. 



Build 100-Foot Fence In Connecticut 

21 NQHS Freshmen Volunteer For Habitat 



loel Rivera and his 
brother Christopher have a 
new dog thanks to 21 North 
Quincy High School fresh- 
men who recently partici- 
pated as Habitat for Hu- 
manity volunteers. 

The North Quincy High 
students built a 100-foot 
long fence for the Rivera 
family of Bridgeport, CT, as 
part of a two-day Habitat for 
Humanity work session. 

The fence allows a new 
puppy to run safely in the 
Rivera family's back yard. 

The students, who vol- 
unteered oo Bridgeport's 
East Side, were members of 
Ron Erikson and Kipp 
Caldwell's Advanced Ge- 
ometry Classes. The stu- 
dents are: Sine Callanan, 
Christine Cheong, Clive 
Chung, David Dao, Eliza- 
beth Favorito, Lori Ferris, 
Nicole Johnson, John Ngo, 
Joe Ngo, Julia Nguyen, 
Norman Yuen, Frances 
Chow, Romina Espinola, 
Richard Lee, Gregg 
Minezzi, Kaite Mo, Kurt 
Nason, Nina Nguyen, 
Caitlyn Slowe, Nancy 
Yankun, and Michael Yu. 

The diverse group of 
students, Erikson said. 



worked well together and 
impressed the people in 
Bridgeport. 

"We are using North 
Quincy High School as our 
model program," said Jef- 
frey Carter, construction 
supervisor for the large 
Habitat for Humanity Pro- 
gram of Greater Bridgeport. 
"Each year Ron Erikson and 
Kipp Caldwell bring a won- 
derful, spirited group of 
hard workers. Their school 
and their community should 
be very proud of them." 

"We are very proud of 
our students," said Cald- 
well. "They did a wonderful 
job, building that 100-foot 
long fence, doing some 
brick work and painting." 

Erikson said he hoped 
that volunteering would 
become a part of his stu- 
dents' educational experi- 
ence and carry on into their 
adult lives. "These students 
are in Advanced Level 
classes and, if they continue 



to work hard, they will be 
successful adults with ex- 
cellent careers," Erikson 
said. "Kipp and I want the 
students to see how fortu- 
nate they are in comparison 
to others. We hope that this 
volunteer experience will 
encourage them to make 
volunteering a regular part 
of their lives." 

Erikson said the students 
raised over $2,000 to cover 
expenses such as food and 
transportation and still make 
a large donation to the 
Habitat cause. On behalf of 
his students Erikson thanked 
all who contributed and 
gave special thanks to Sean 
Moran of VERC Car Rent- 
als of Quincy for the vans 
used by the group. 

The North Quincy stu- 
dents, Erikson said, are 
proud of a job well done. 

And Bridgeport's Joel 
and Christopher Rivera are 
now the proud owners of a 
new puppy. 



5 Residents Stonehill Gradusates 

Five Quincy residents David Gunther, John Ha- 

recently graduated from nafin. John Riley and Tho- 

Stonehill College in Easton. mas Satkevich. 

The are Karen Chong, 



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NORTH QUINCY High School students recently built a 100-foot fence in Bridgeport, CT, as 
part of a Habitat For Humanity Project Sitting from left are: Nicole Johnson, Sine Callanan, 
and Lori Ferris. Kneeling from left are: Nancy Yankun, Romina Espinola, Elizabeth 
Favorito, Caitlin Slowe, Christine Cheong, Nina Nguyen, and Julia Nguyen. Standmg from 
left are: Gregg Mine^, John Ngo, Michael Yu, Faculty Advisor Kipp Caldwell, Joe Ngo, 
David Dao, Faculty Advisor Ron Erikson, Kurt Nason, Richard Lee, Norman Yuen, Clive 
Chung, Kaite Mo, and NQHS Principal Louis loanilli. Missing from photo is student Frances 
Chow. 




CHRISTOPHER RIVERA, held by his mother, wants to see what all the fuss is about as 21 
North Quincy High freshmen volunteered to build a fence for his backyard as part of a 
Habitat For Humanity project. Students from left are: Caitlin Slowe, Sine Callanan, Romina 
Espinola, Gregg Minezzi, Clive Chung, Elizabeth Favorito, David Dao, Christine Cheong, 
and Kaite Mo. 



Will Be Closed Saturdays 
During July and August. 

Have A Nice, Safe Summer. 



» *•#»«•«» 



U.I -n. ..i^-. 



Thunday, July 20, 2000 Tli« Qulnoy Sun Page9 



Outback Steakhouse 
Opening Raises $8,450 
For Father Bill's Place 

The opening celebration 
at the Outback Steakhouse, 
227 Parking Way, last week 
netted a badly needed 
$8,450 for Father Bill's 
Place, which is bursting at 
the seams with homeless 
men. 

"It's really good for a 
one night, three hour fund- 
raiser," said John Yazwin- 
ski, the executive director. 
"We are grateful to the Out- 
back Steakhouse for their 
cooperation." 

Fr. William McCarthy, 
after whom the shelter is 
named, expressed his grati- 
tude to the Outback Steak- 
house and Manager Ralph 
Vitale. 

"They really over ex- 
tended themselves to help 
us, he said. They showed a 
true and neighborly and THERE WAS A lot to smile about for Fr. William 
charitable spirit for which McCarthy and Ralph Vitale, manager of the new Outback 
we are most grateful." Steakhouse, Parking Way, Quincy Center. The opening 

Yazwinski said the two celebration of the restaurant raised $8,450 for Father Bill's 
locations of the homeless Place, the shelter for the homeless named for Father 
shelter, the old Registry McCarthy of St John's Church 
building at 38 Broad St. and lies farm out the children to 

grandparents or foster care 
while they are staying at the 
homeless shelter, he said. 

The opening of the Out- 
back Steakhouse's first 
South Shore restaurant was 
held July 10, featuring a 
special array of compli- 
mentary food and drink with 
an Australian flavor. 




Nature Tour Of 
Squantum Point Park Saturday 

The Quincy Park De- animals. It is the site of the led by naturalist Tom Pal- 
partment's "Environmental old Dennison Air Field and mer. Palmer is a member of 
Treasures of Quincy" pro- some interesting features the Board of Directors for 
gram will conduct a nature remain from the historical the Neponset River Water- 
tour of Squantum Point Park use of the property. shed Association. 
Saturday at 4 p.m. The MDC is planning to All those people who 

Interested parties are add walking paths and pre- arrive by an 

asked to meet in the MDC serve Squantum Point Park "environmentally friendly: 
parking lot directly adjacent as passive open space once mode of transportation, such 
to the park. work is completed by Mas- as public transportation, 

Squantum Point Park is sachusetts Electric and New bike or carpool, will be 
an MDC-owned park lo- England Power on the site, given a prize, 
cated at the mouth of the 1^^ MDC is working with 

Neponset River. The park ^^e landscape architectural For more information on 
features interesting natural f»™ of Carol R. Johnson the Environmental Treas- 
features such as tidal flats, a Associate in developing a "res of Quincy program, 
salt marsh, beaches, and ^^esign plan for this park. call the Quincy Park De- 
various species of plants and This nature tour will be partment at 376-1254. 

Historical Society Plans 
Provincetown Boat Trip 



(Maralin Manning Photo) 



Space is still available 
for the Tuesday, July 25, 
Provincetown boat trip via 
Captain John Boats spon- 
sored by the Quincy His- 
torical Society. 

Bus to Plymouth will 
leave Adams Academy, 8 
Adams St., Quincy, at 8 

a.m. The boat leaves Ply- 



mouth at 10 a.m. and docks 
in Provincetown around 
noon. 

There will be about 3 1/2 
hours to explore Province- 
town. The boat will make a 
return trip to Plymouth at 
3:30 p.m. The bus will be 
waiting to return to Adams 
Academy by 7 p.m. 



Cost of the trip is $40 per 
person for members and $45 
per person for non- 
members. Pre-paid reserva- 
tions must be made at the 
Adams Academy, Monday 
through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 
p.m. 

For more information 
call 627-773-1144. 



the former St. John's School 
on Phipps Street, are aver- 
aging 110 people a night. 

"We have only 95 beds 
so the others have to sleep 
on emergency cots in the 
dining room and in the 
hallways," he said. 



Yazwinski said about 40 
per cent of the homeless at 
Father Bill's Place are 



A $15 donation accepted 



working poor who have at the door went to benefit 

low-paying jobs and are Father Bill's Place. More 

unable to find a permanent than 600 attended the bene- 

place to live. fit opening. 

Since Father Bill's Place Fr. Bill's Place is spon- 
accepts only individuals, sored by the Quincy Inter- 
many of the men with fami- faith Sheltering Coalition. 



Central Baptist Church 

65 Washington St., Quincy 

invites all children to join us at 

SONZONE DISCOVERY CENTER 

VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL 

beginning Monday, July 24th to Friday, 

Juty 28th from 6pm to 8pm 

This year's Vacation Bible School promises to 

be an adventure your children will never forget. 

For information, call 617-479-6512 



QoincY 
Remembers 

The Quincy Millennium Committee is 
putting together a historical video on 
the city of Quincy. If you have expert' 
enced an important time or event in the 
history of Quincy, we invite you to be 
part of our video. Mease submit, along 
with your name, address and telephone 
number, a short description telling us 
of your experience. 

Write to: Quincy Millennium Comminee^ 
1 Menymount Fariway 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Or Emalh rmerrill§ci.quincy.ma.us 




Pligc 10 Til* Qulausgr 8ikn Thursday, July 20, 200t 




526 On NQHS Honor Roll 



STEPHANIE NARVAEZ 



Stephanie Narvaez Honor 
Graduate At Newton Day School 



Stephanie Narvaez of 
Quincy graduated with hon- 
ors at the 120th com- 
mencement exercises at 
Newton Country Day 
School of the Saaed Heart. 

Narvaez was a member 
of PRISM (People for a 
Racially Inclusive Society 

of Multiculturalism), Gospel 
Choir, and the Art Com- 
mittee. 



For her senior project, a 
required five-week intern- 
ship program that provides 
seniors the opportunity to 
explore a career, Narvaez, 
an accomplished flamenco 
dancer, worked for Fla- 
menco, USA in Cambridge. 

The daughter of Antonio 
and Marie Narvaez, she will 
attend New York University 
in the fall. 



• • • 



Sonshine Pre-School 

OPEN REGISTRATION 
for Boys & Girls 

3 and 4 Year Olds 

Meets Mondays-Fridays 

September thru May 

Mornings or Afternoons 

Call 472-2345 for information 

Or sign up At the Salvation Army At the 

Comer of Elm 

and Baxter Streets, Quincy 



North Quincy High 
School lists 526 students on 
its honor roll for the fourth 
term. 

They are: 

DISTINCTION 

Grade 9: Courtney 
Breslin, Jennifer Bun, Mi- 
chael Carey, Raymond 
Chan, May Cheung, Dar- 
quin Chiu, Kathy Chou, 
David Dao, Romina Espi- 
nola, Elizabeth Favorito, 
Cristina Galecia, Lily 
Kwok, Anita Kwong, Amy 
Kit-Zing Lee, Jacqueline 
Leung, Stacey Lynch, Kath- 
erine Marshall, Erin 
McFarland, Mary Mercurio, 
Kaite Mo, Kimberly Morris- 
sey, Eva Mui, Jaclyn Mur- 
phy, Kurt Nason, Jo Ngo, 
Joh Ngo, Julia Nguyen, 
Suong-Nguyet Nguyen, 
Kevin Phung, Steven Reilly, 
William Se Tow, Sowmya 
Srinivas, April Suprey, 
Kathleen Timmins, Jennifer 
Venuti, Carol Kay Wong, 
Jennifer Wong, Leon Wong, 
Shirley Wong, Dong Wu, 
Eleanor Wu, Nancy 
Yankun, Wen Jing Yu. 

Grade 10: Diana Ber- 
beran, Philip Chan, Winnie 
Wing Yi Chan, Christopher 
Chemicki, Shelley Cheung, 
Cindy ChOu, Albert Chow, 
Lisa Garvey, Alexander 
Gray, Caillin Herlihy, Billy 
Lam, William Lee, Teresa 
Lok, Sue Li Moy, Billy Ng, 
Lily Ng, Bruce Ngo, Kim 
Nguyen, Ngan Nguyen, Yen 
Nguyen, Mi Pham, Matthew 
Ryan, Michael Ryan, Amy 
Se Tow, Lily Tam, Noah 
Tubo, Charles Vidoli Jr., 
Sarah Wong, William Chiu 
Wong, Eva Zhang, Kevin 
Zhang. 

Grade 11: Charles Ac- 
ton, Diana Ains\ey, Sheila 
Bohan, Brian Breslin, 

Roisin Callanan, Galvin 
Chow, Catherine Constan- 
tine, Abigail Duffy, 
Xiaowen Fang, Paul 
Garvey, Andrea Hettman, 
Vikki Ho, Danielle 
Hutchins, Hien Huynh, 
Colleen Lahar, Ying Fung 
Lam, Kai Lau, Susan Lee, 
Susanna Liu, Joan Louie, 
Matthew Petit, Wendy 
Wong, Matthew Yohe. 



POUnCAL ADVERTISEMENT 



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with 

Senator Michael W. Morrissey 



Thursday, July 27. 2000 

t 6-8pm 



Marina Bay, Quincy 
Traditional Summertime Cookout 

featuring "Fat City Band** 

Donation $20 per person 

For Tickets and Information* call 61 7-376-0900 

Checks may be sent to the CTE. Michael W. Morrissey. 
PO Box 215. North Quincy. MA 02171 




Paid.fiqrml 



ComuOte 10 Re-elect Mkhael W. 



^^m^M^'^m 



Grade 12: Ian Albert!, 
Angela Andronico, Jessica 
Barbeau, Thomas Bell, Amy 
Cheung, Hoi Ting Cheung, 
Lisa Chow, Wing Ka Chui, 
David Constantine, Michael 
Del Rosso, Nancy 
Dinsmore, Lauren Enos, 
Rebecca Favorito, Eric 
Foley, Kathlyn Gates, Ian 
Hamilton, Sarah Houghton, 
Katie Jellison, Christine 
Kurpeski, Edward Lau, Jes- 
sica Lorman, Kelly Mackey, 
Christine Marre, Daniel 
McDonagh, Dana 

McLaughlin, Li Moy, Ash- 
ley Murphy, Mikel Panajoti, 
Siu Lun Pau, Lauren Pizzi, 
Sarah Price, Tammy Shea, 
Natalie Shweiri, Ellen 
Trung, Christopher Walsh, 
Kenix Wan, Christine 
Wong, Stanley Wong, Anna 
Zhu. 

HIGH HONORS 

Grade 9: Raina Celo, 
May Chen, Paul Cheung, 
Katherine Constantopoulos, 
Sarah Cormiea, Daniel 
Coughlin, Kristen Eng, Ra- 
chel Enos, Heidi Hu, 
Maureen Kelley, Lily Tham 
Ko, Supicha Kridaratikom, 
Katharine Loughmiller, 
Sheila Lynch, Kourtney 
Mark, Colby Morrissey, 
Tuyen Pham, Marilyn 
Power, Meaghan Raftery, 
Jessica Smialek, Christine 
Sullivan, Kenneth Young, 
Jerry Yuen. 

Grade 10: Patrick Bre- 
goli, Irene Cheng, Kelly 
Coleman, Kahli Dearani, 
Sherie Demonte, Sean 

Ginty, Frank Guest, Beth 
Houghton, Elizabeth Lo, 
Jeffrey Louie, Dennis 
Mackey, Joshua Mason, 
Melissa Mastorilli, Katelyn 
McDonald, Matthew Moy, 
Emily Mui, Jillian Mullen, 
Son Nguyen, Adam O'Hara, 
Patrick Renzi, Timothy 
Renzi, Kelly Rice, Troy 
Tower, Ky Vu, Stephen 
Yee, Chung Ying, Cheung 
Yu, Suzanne Yu. 

Grade 11: Rebecca Bal- 
lard, Natalie Barahona, El- 
len Blaney, Paul Chan, 
Laura Clarke, Kellee Con- 
ley, Jolene Dooley, Sean 
Fennelly, Patrick Friel, 
Ryan Graeber, Christopher 
Johnson, Patrick Lahar, Ra- 
chel Lau, Christine Look, 
Samantha Mejidez, Kyle 
Piazza, Merideth Power, 
Hoi So, Brian Stock, Emily 
Szeto, Vicki Tang, Qianwei 
Wen, Adrian K. Wong. 

Grade 12: Matthew Al- 
varado, Lauren Awed, An- 
drew Bennett, Dianna Chan, 
Rebecca Chan, En Tong 
Chen, Betty Cheng, Tse Yee 
Cheng, Charlene Cote, An- 



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9 Maple St., 
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drew Currie, Kellie Des- 
mond, Justin Drysdale, Rita 
El Hachem, Amy Fager- 
lund, Terianne Fitzgerald, 
John Gavin, Meghan Ginty, 
Janelle Hersey, Gabriel Ho, 
Shirley Kwok, Elizabeth 
Leuchte, Erica Limoncelli, 
Graham McShane, Wei 
Guang Mei, Ryan Minezzi, 
Ryan Murray, Thuy An 
Nguyen, Matthew 
O'Connell, Edward Petroni, 
Caitlin Powers, Brianne 
Ritchie, Frances Ronayne, 
Kevin Shea, Jeffrey Tam, 
Ellen Tang, Lisa Vidoli, 
Cheuk Kin Wan, Jaime 
Wilkinson, Lynda Wilson, 
Elaine Wong, Kimberly 
Wong, Tommy Yuen, Alan 
Yung. 

HONORS 
Grade 9: Merideth Ac- 
ton, Courtney Allen, Julie 

Ann, Sean Bowes, Alice 
Chan, Timothy Chan, 
Christine Cheong, Frances 
Chow, Clive Chung, Alex- 
andra Ciccariello, Joshua 
Clancy, Michael Cook, 
Colleen Cornell, James 
Coughlin, Juliann Cyhan, 
Shannon Desmond, Robert 
Dinsmore, Anita Euerle, 
Jessie Fang, Amanda Fasoli, 
Lori Ferris, David Fong, 
Alyson Griffin, Erica Hall- 
sen, Lauren Holt, Jessica 
Jacques, Sheila Jafarzadeh, 
Nicole Johnson, Thomas 
Kelly, Cindy Lee, Eddie 
Lee, Simon Leung, Joy Lin, 
Casey Lorman, Bruce Mag- 
gio, Erin Maione, David 
Michael McCallum, Kath- 
leen McCarthy, Meghan 
McCombs, Lauren McGee, 
Julia McGunigle, Gregory 
Minezzi, Peter Monaco, 
Kevin Moy, Ashley Nee, 
Cindy Ng, Kathleen 
O'Brien, Kelly O'Brien, 
Kerin O'Toole, Amanda 
Perkins, Matthew Peters, 
Sarunya Phianphaisanlikhit, 
Julie Rackauskas, Erik Ran- 
strom, Lauren Ready, Lisa 
Rubino, James Ryder, 
Caitlyn Slowe, Lauren 
Struzik, Catherine Tan, 
Linda Thach, Christopher 
Traietti, Adam Tringale, 
Wilson Trung, Huan Gian 
Tsui, Paul Vu, Thuy Lieu 
Huynh Vu, Meaghan 
Whalen, Nellie Wong, 
Wayne Wong, Kevin Yan, 
Ricky Yang, Michael Yu, 
Norman Yuen. 



Grade 10: Leo Ahern, 
Nancy An, David Berming- 
ham, Samantha Chaisson, 
Richard Chan, Chun Long 
Cheung, Dick Cheung, 
Marianne Chimi, Christo- 
pher Coughlin, Matthew 
Donovan, Caitlin Doughty, 
Erin Downey, Meghan 
Driscoll, Gintautas Dum- 
cius, Darcy Fay, Michael 
Feetham, Danielle Fran- 
cisco, Michael Gethin, 
Aaron Goodman, Coleen 
Haley, Michael Hayhurst, 
Meghan Holt, Jeffrey Hunt, 
Gregory Johnson, Derek 
Keezer, James Keohane, 
Amy Kwan, Allison Lacey, 
Angela Lam, Lisa Lam, 
Richard Lau, Kathy Lee, 
Davi*» Liang, Eric Liu, 
Jenny Lo, Patrick Losi, An- 
drei MacKenzie, Lauren 
Magalid, Scott Markarian, 
Katherine Markhard, Laura 
Matos, Michelle Mattson, 



Christopher McGillicuddy, 
Philip McGillicuddy, Kate 
McGue, Meghan McLean, 
Wayne Moynihan, Jeffrey 
Narbonne, Andrew Ngo, 
Erica Peterson, Valerie Ric- 
ciardi, April Rodgers, Pat- 
rick Ryder, Kristyn Shea, 
Daniel Sheehan, Jennifer 
Shi, Lauren Sleeth, Michael 
Starzyk, Jacinda Su, Lisa 
Tran, Thomas Vinson, Bert 
Vivatyukan, Michael Wong, 
Sabrina Wong, Tina Wong, 
Jerry Wooten. 

Grade 11: Jennifer 
Ahern, Steven Barkowski, 
Laura Baszkiewicz, Julie 
Beers, Caitlin Calnan, Lau- 
ren Campbell, Megan Cas- 
sidy, Mei Chan, Margaret 
Chuong, Jennifer Conley, 
Jessica Cronin, Lori Delu- 
cia, Ying Diep, Keith Do- 
herty, Daniel Douglas, 
Jenny Eng, Kirsten Fowles, 
Holly Golden, Sean- 
William Goodale, Matthew 
Gregory, Gillian IJawes, 
Melissa Hogle, Matthew 
Holt, Pauline Kam, Anne 
Kelly, Hugo Kwan, Vincent 
Lam, Susan Lee, Rebecca 
Leuchte, Man Yee Lo, 
Christopher Lockhead, 
Mayling Luc, Laetitia Lutts, 
Andrew Mahoney, Kerri 
Maione, Gregory McGin- 
ness, Jacqueline McManus, 
Jacquelyn Murphy, Patrick 
O'Donnell, Jenelle O'Neil, 
Jonathan Paquette, Nam 
Phan, Adam Phung, Casey 
Ridge, Camelia Saffarini, 

Harold Sham, Brandon 
Sleeth, Wilson So, Edward 
Stevens, Jenny Tam, Peter 
Tam, Baongoc Trannguyen, 
Daniel Vo, Lisa Wong, 
Wendy Wong, Janet 
Yankun, Bonita Yip, Yan 
Yu. 

Grade 12: Sean Adams, 
Joseph Barry, Alexandra 
Berta, Vania Brito, Leeann 
Brown, David Browne, 
Brian Burke, Shauna Bums, 
Philip Cai, Kin Chan, Tung 
Chau, Eric Chow, Jaclyn 
Christo, Melissa Ciar- 
mataro, Mellissa Compston, 
Elizabeth Copson, Kristin 
Coughlin, Lisa Delia Croce, 
Brian Deptula, Brian 
Deshler, Kelly Duane, 
Matthew Fay, Joseph Flynn, 
William Griffin, Maureen 
HoUeran, Pic Sia Hung, 
Elisabeth Hunt, Janell Jime- 
nez, Erin Johnson, Crystal 
Kelly, Yue Kung, Jonathan 
Lanham, Kimberly Lavery, 
Sally Leung, Sai Wah Lo, 
Richard Loughmiller, Wing 
Sze Lui, Michelle Maguire, 
James Martel, ron Albert 
Martinez, Kevin Mason, 
James Mateu, Matthew 
McCann, Martin 

McDonagh, Pearse 
McGrath, Heather Meighan, 
Deirdre Morris, Maureen 
Murphy, Huy Nguyen, 
Daniel O'Toole, William 
O'Toole, Stephanie Oakes, 
Erin Pickering, Ekaterini 
Regas, Michael Reidy, Jor- 
El Santiago, Anne Shields, 
Kimberly Sing, Jennifer 
Siteman, Ntina Sourmaidis, 
Jessica Sprague, Eric Suen, 
Patrick Tam, Minh Tuan 
Tan, Donna Thach, Jason 
Tubo, Kellie Whalen, Al- 
fred Wong, Kim Har Wong, 
Wilson Wong, Christopher 
Worley, Lena Yuen, Kin 
Yun, Warren Yung, John 
Zuffante. 



-n ry 

•«.■•<♦ ..If. V- 



TT 



Thuraday, July 20, 2000 Tlf Quinoy gm> Page 11 



10- Year Bonding Plan 
Sent To City Council 



40 Residents On NU Dean's List 



(Cont'd From Page 1) 
debt has also been assumed, 
including: $6 million for the 
purchase of open space; $4 
million for additional school 
renovation; $2 million for 
general building improve- 
ments; $1.8 million for the 
five-year Water Phase V 
project; $1.5 million for 
departmental equipment; 
and $800,000 for road work. 
Concerning the antici- 
pated debt, ^Mayor James 
Sheets singled out the $6 
million expected to go to- 
wards the acquisition of 
open space in the city under 
Project Prosper, his aggres- 
sive open space initiative. 

Sheets said that $2 mil- 
lion of those funds were 
earmarked for the clean-up 
of the 22 acres of property 
received in the city's High- 
point agreement, with the 
remaining $4 million going 
to Project Prosper. "This 



proposition (for open space 
acquisition) is one-of-kind," 
the mayor said. "It's never 
been done before in 
Quincy." 

What's more, said 
Sheets, funds from the re- 
cently passed Hotel/Motel 
tax will pay the debt service 
on the purchase of open 
space after 2004, the first 
full year of its implementa- 
tion. 

McFarland pointed out 
that, after the local room 
occupancy tax and the vari- 
ous reimbursements are 
factored into the equation, 
the yearly net payments on 
the proposed debt service 
meet the mayor's goal of 
being less than five percent 
of the total estimated 
budget, the only exception 
being the 2001 payment, 
which is 5.15 percent of the 
total budget. 



The plan was referred to 
the Finance Committee for 
study. 

Estimated net yearly 
payments and percentages 
of budget are as follows: 

2001: $9,416,052.68, 
5.15 percent. 

2002: $8,577,092.08, 
4.48 percent. 

2003: $7,976,843.77, 
3.99 percent. 

2004: $6,302,131.97, 

3.02 percent. 

2005: $8,519,314.44, 
3.90 percent. 

2006: $8,122,857.81, 
3.56 percent. 

2007: $8,789,891.92, 
3.69 percent. 

2008: $7,938,947.96, 
3.19 percent. 

2009: $8,645,477.48, 
3.32 percent. 

2010: $8,231,074.79, 

3.03 percent. 



Forty Quincy residents 
have been named to the 
Dean's List for the spring 
quarter at Northeastern Uni- 
versity. 

They are: 

Louis J. Amaru, Amber 
L. Anderson, Natalya V. 
Belonozhko, Alicia A. Ber- 
trand, Michael D. Eddy, 
Irene M. Eklund, Domenic 



Gulla, Wancheng He, Rich- 
ard W. Hillis, Bashar T. 
Hussein, Lisa Infinger, Mi- 
chael F. Lencki, Emily J. 
Marsden, Andrew J. 
Sweeney, Crystal L. Tam, 
Mei W. Tang, Eva S. Wong, 
Karim Zekri, Christine M. 
Cardillo, David T. Carney. 

Kin Wah Chan, Jake 
Costa, Ken J. Guan, Felicity 



N. Ho, Kim H. Ho, Huong 
T. Hoang, Eric Y. Lee, Kin 
Y. Lee, Erica L. Smith, Ca- 
nan Yesilcimen, Wing Hang 
Yu, Wai-Man Chan, Joshua 
B. Cronin, Michelle L. 
Custeau, Suiying Huang, 

Weijun Li, Siu Kwan Lui, 
Minh D. Tran, Su Chong U, 
Jiawen Zhao. 



Quincy Elks Host Veterans 



The Quincy Lodge of 
Elks took patients from the 
Jamaica Plain Veterans 
Administration Hospital and 
the Chelsea Soldiers Home 
on their 32nd annual boat 
ride and Cookout recently. 



The vets boarded Richie 
Sutherland's boat "The 
Irene" at Hingham Harbor 
and, after a scenic tour of 
Boston Harbor, landed on 
Georges Island where mem- 
bers of the Lodge treated 



them to a cookout. 

After an afternoon of fun 
and games and a tour of the 
fort on Georges Island, they 
headed home. Each patient 
received an appropriate T- 
shirt on leaving the boat. 



Nickerson Legion Post 
Awards Student Awards 



The Nickerson American 
Legion Post recently pre- 
sented its 2000 school 
awards to eight local stu- 
dents. 

The recipients are: 

Margaret Ho and David 
Geurriero from the Squan- 
tum School; Mathew M. 
Moran and Rita M. Buscher, 
Atlantic Middle School; and 
Sarah Houghton and Kath- 
leen Joyce, North Quincy 
High School. 

The Nickerson Post also 
presented R.O.T.C. awards 
to Cadet Col. Stanley Wong 
for scholastic excellence 
and Cadet Lt. Col. Patrick 
Bell Tam for military ex- 
cellence. 

In addition, the Post par- 
ticipates in the annual Me- 
morial Day and Veterans' 



Day parades each year. 
Other volunteer work in- 
cludes hosting Bingo at the 
Jamaica Plain V.A. twice a 
year and sponsoring a cook- 
out each summer for the 
Shriner's children at the 
Post. 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



14 BEALE ST 773-4600 



The Post hall is also 
available for local civic and 
community functions in 
Squantum and Quincy. 



WED&THURS JULY 19 & 20 
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flasrrm Nvjrenc OiAciic n ait indcpcmlenl iraaitunfiii tif lnf(hcr cducatiiiii i-hartrfvd tiy the state cif Manachuictts. It 
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WOMEN'S HEALTH CARE AT SOUTH SHORE HOSPITAL 



The regions leaders 

in women's health care 
are in your region 

Whether you're thinking about having a baby, approaching 
mid-life, or well into your senior years, here's great news: 
Physicians and midwives affiliated with South Shore Hospital — 
the region's number one choice for women's health care — 
have offices nearby. 

So if you're planning for a new phase of your life or just looking 
for a change, call us today. 

Call 1-800-325-5454 or visit 

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Pigcl2 Tli« Qulaoar Sun Tbunday, Jnly 20, 24NM 



Prayer Service For Eritrea, 
Ethiopia Held At St. Catherine's 



118 Residents Graduate 
From Northeastern 



Over 100 people at- 
tended a recent fundraiser 
and prayer service for peace 
in Eritrea and Ethiopia at St. 
Catherine's Greek Orthodox 
Church, 157 Beale St., 
Wollaston. 

Rev. Andreas Mark- 
opoulous of St. Catherine's 
hosted the service and was 
joined by several other cler- 
gymen from the area. 

Guest speaker was Me- 
brahtu Tewolde, chairperson 
of the Eritrean Peace Cam- 
paign, who discussed the 
ongoing war between the 
two countries and the plight 



of thousands left homeless 
by the war. 

The two African nations 
have been fighting a bitter 
border war since 1998 and 
some death toll figures are 
as high as 100,000 with 
close to half a million refu- 



gees. 

For more information, 
contact the non-profit Eri- 
trean Development Founda- 
tion (EDF) at 1111 14th St., 
NW, Suite 1000, Washing- 
ton, DC 20005, telephone 
(202)408-6995. 



Adrienne Fowkes 
Graduates From BC 

Adrienne Fowkes of She is the daughter of 

Quincy recently graduated Mr. and Mrs. Gerard D. 

from Boston College with a Fowkes of Fontiac Rd., 

bachelor's degree in history. Quincy. 



Elizabeth Griffey, M.D. 

announces new convenient Tuesday evening 
and Saturday summer hours. 

Board Certilied in General Surgery 

Specialty Services in Breast Surgery and Nutrition Support 

New Patients Wekome 

Office Location 

500 Congress Street, Suite 2A 

Quincy, MA 02169 

Phone; 617-472-2255 Fax: 617-427-3896 



Quincy Medical Center 
South Shore Hospital 



Carney Hospital 
Milton Hospital 










:» Could yoD we some liel]^? 

=» We offer ahigh qiuOily, oompaaBifHiato 

Adult Diy Health Cue Prognm idiioh senreB 
the South Shore area» inclndiiig Qouicy, 
Bnintree, Weymonih and Milton. 

=» Oar program inolndestnuupoftatioii, the 
Krrvcmoitknwne, a bfflne oodtod hmch and 
8iiacksprovided.CnllB,eseidse, games and 
troekly field trips to make the dayv /ha and 

=» Location: The SalratioD Army, 

^ at the oomer of Elm ft Baxter Si, Quincy 




For more mfofmitiMi w to anai^ 
phase can (617) 479-3040 




Adult Day Heohh Core Program 



One hundred eighteen 
Quincy residents were 
among the 1,800 students 
who recently graduated 
from Northeastern Univer- 
sity. 

They are: , 

Diane Acerra, Vasith 
Ajchariyamam, Nuha M. 
Alrayes, Melissa L. Ander- 
son, Mambindou Bamba, 
Yolanda Baquet, Laura 
Barke, Monica Bartlett, Sree 
Bhaktavatsala, Robert Bor- 

gen> Mark C. Boussy, Kim- 
berly A. Bridson, Lori L. 
Carney, Xinmin Chen, 
Ethan J. Coulson, Michelle 
Cox, Ennio Eleuteri, Wei- 
Jun Feng, Michael W. 
Frank, Philip Gaboury, 
Hong Gao, Karen A. 
Gameau, Loretta Griswold, 
Domenic Gulla, Faith A. 
Harvey, James E. Hinds, 
Wei-Jay Huang, Bashar T. 
Hussein, Yasser MM Ismail, 
Steven R. Ismaili. 



Yili Jin, Susan Levangie, 
Wen Li, Yu-Chun Uu. Scott 
M. Longway, Rodelio Q. 
MiEindawe, Jennifer L. Man- 
duca, David M. Martinez, 
Keri E. McMahon, Henry 
Miller, Melissa A. Miller, 
Heather A. Murphy, Patricia 
A. Murphy, Christine 
Naoum Heffern, Srujana 
Nekkanti, Kim Thuy T. 
Nguyen, Vivian Nguyen, 
Ruixing Ouyang, Chang H. 
Park, Robert A. Pollara, 
Stephanie N. Post, Ann 
Roemischer, Monique 
Schmitt, Stephen W. 
Schneider, Michelle Schott, 
David C. Skutul, Peter 
Szyjka, Pei Wang, James B. 
Williams, Todd S. Wilson. 

Karim Zekri, Zhi-Yong 
Zhai, Mark Archambault, 
Brian Bums, Daniel Pak 
Cheung, Joe C. Fang, James 
R. Ferrara, Shelagh E. Fos- 
ter, Felicity N. Ho, Kim H. 
Ho, Maureen A. Joyce- 
Greene, Gary Garwai Lai, 



John Laws, Eric Y. Lee, 
Lian Si Li, Xin Li, Jinghong 

Liu, Julie A. Marinilli, Lee 
A. Martin, Elisabeth M. 
McAleney, Karen McCabe, 
Ariane M. Mercadante, Pat- 
rick R. Moroney, Cariann 
Nelson, Wendy Y. Ou, Scan 
Shields, Elaine Soohoo, Yi 
Man Tarn, Shu-Min Tsai, 
Stephanie A. Tufts. 

Mao-Lung Yeh, Canan 
Yesilcimen, Ahmed Abu 
Ghazaleh, Angela "M. Ber- 
gamini, Heidi L. Blanc, 

Yung C. Chan, F^i Cheng, 
You Cheng, Kevin Cheung, 
Lisa M. Denaro, Paul Z. 
Gao, loana Giurca, Irene 
Gonzalez, Ann Harte, Julie 
Homicz, Kevin S. Kwan, 
Kai Lau, Weijun U, Jason 
Lin, Li Ling, Siu Kwan Lui, 
Sonia Peck, Laurent Ric- 
ciardi, Katayoun Shahed- 
Dirin, Ying Sun, Minh D. 
Tran, Su Chong U, Frances 
Desalvo. 



Community Policing Cook-Out 
Friday At Ward 4 Center 



The third annual Com- 
munity Policing Cook-out 
will be held Friday, July 21 
at 5:30 p.m. at the Ward 4 
Community Center, 100 
Brooks Ave. 

"We should all be proud 
that Ward 4 was one of the 
first districts to put three 
full-time police foot patrol 
officers on our streets. This 
is your chance to meet them 
while enjoying your favorite 



" said Ward 4 
Michael 



barbecue fare. 

Councillor 

D'Amico, 

D'Amico said the fam- 
ily-oriented event will fea- 
ture demonstrations of ad- 
vanced law enforcement 



equipment by the police 
department. Also on hand 
will be horses comprising 
the city's Mounted Patrol. 

The local rock and roll 
band, "Peter Swan," will 
entertain. 



Kara McSweeney On Dean's List 

Kara McSweeney of spring semester at Roger 
Quincy has been named to Williams University in 
the Dean's List for the Bristol, R.I. 



MANTIS 

PLANTS & FLOWERS 





20% QFF 



ALL CEMENT STATUARY ITEMS IN STOCK! 

CHOOSE FROM A GREAT SELECTION OF: 
•BIRD BATHS 
• PAGODAS 
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SALE STARTS JULY 1ST AND ENDS JULY31ST 

645 HANCOCK STREET 
WOLLASTON, MA 02170 • 617-320-6879 

Open Monday thm Saturday 9-6 

attention""""'" 

Quincy Sun Mail Subscribers 

If you are moving, please inform us of your new address at least 
two weeks before. The Post Office will not fon/vard your copy of The 
Sun. 

To prevent delivery of your copy from being interrupted, please fill 
out the form below or notify us by telephone (617) 471-3100. 




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Thunday,July20,20M T1m< 



Page 13 



'Opportunity Of A Lifetime' 
Says Edward McGuinness 

Drawing Superman 

A Super Job For 

Quincy Illustrator 



By CRAIG SALTEKS 

It's a bird, it's a plane, 
it's... Edward McGuinness? 

Admittedly, it doesn't 
have the same ring to it, but 
that's just fine with 

M^WSB^St \^B:'xm: 

sponsible for drawing the 
DC Comics character 
known as Superman. 

Yes, that Supepnan. 

"It's just the grace of 
God," said McGuinness of 
his landing the most coveted 
job in comic book illustra- 
tion in September of 1999. 
"I've always loved Super- 
man but, in many ways, 
never thought the job was 
attainable. It's just been an 
amazing experience." 

That experience started 
when New York based DC 
Comics, the General Motors 
of the comic book industry, 
launched a campaign to 
modernize its forelocked 
superhero for the next cen- 
tury and next millennium. 

McGuinness had already 
built a small but successful 
reputation for himself in the 
industry. Starting with 
Vamparella, a comic he 
says he "wouldn't work on 
now" because the message 
conflicts with his personal 
beliefs, he moved on to il- 
lustrate Marvel's Wolverine 
'96, The Dead Pool series. 
The Fighting American, 
Cable, and The Hulk. At the 
time of the Superman offer, 
McGuinness was drawing 
Mr. Majestic for Wildstorm 
Comics. 

"Mr. Majestic was an 
archetype of Superman," 
said McGuinness. "I never 
thought I'd get to draw Su- 
perman so I was drawing 
him vicariously through Mr. 
Majestic, doing things with 
him I'd do with Superman." 

McGuinness, who says 
his style is heavily influ- 
enced by the Manga/Anime 
style so popular in Japan, ^ 
was a perfect fit for the re- 
vamped Superman. "It was 
the right time," said 
McGuinness. "They were 
looking for a new approach 
and it all just came to- 
gether." 

But it almost didn't. 

McGuinness, who has no 
formal art training but has 
been drawing for as long as 
he can remember, had al- 
ready committed to six is- 
sues of Mr. Majestic when 
the call came from DC 
Comics. 

"I was in a bind," he 
said. "This was an opportu- 
nity of a lifetime but I'd 
already made a commit- 
ment." 

After much soul search- 
ing and with the help of his 
wife Michelle, McGuinness 
finally called DC Comics 
Editor Edward Berganza 
and turned down the offer. 

McGuinness was as 
shocked as anyone, he said, 
when Berganza called him 
back tojay DC Ownics was 
wtUiofilto wait, "I couldn't 



believe it," he said. 

The Superman comics, 
McGuinness said, are di- 
vided into fou( separate se- 
ries: Superman, which 
McGuinness illustrates; The 

fures of Superman; and Ac- 
tion Comics. There are also 
several offshoots including 
Supergirl and Superboy. 

"The process is a lot 
more in-depth than most 
people think," McGuinness 
said. "It's very specialized." 

According to McGuin- 
ness, Superman begins with 
writer Jeph Lebo, who col- 
laborated with McGuinness 
on Wolverine '96 and The 
Fighting American and rec- 
ommended McGuinness for 
the Superman comics. 

Lebo sends his storylines 
to New York where Ber- 
ganza edits them and sends 
them to McGuinness. 
McGuinness then pencils in 
his drawmgs and sends them 
back to Berganza four or 
five pages at a time. Those 
drawings are then inked by 
Cam Smith, who lives in 
England, and again sent to 
Berganza in New York. 

The process speeds up 
from there as the pages are 
scanned and sei\to Tanya 
and Richard Horie, husband 
and wife colorists in Cali- 
fornia who colorize the im- 
ages by computer. After 
that, the pages are sent back 
to New York for a final edit 
and printing. 

The process, McGuin- 
ness said, is fairly time con- 
suming, so much so that 
what he's drawing today 
won't hit the stands until 
December. 

McGuinness says he's 
happy with the process, 
however, and the freedom 
he's given to draw Super- 
man as he sees fit, borrow- 
ing much, he said, from not 
only Japanese comics but 
the Superman animated 
television series and the 
classic Superman comics of 
the 1930's and 1940's. That 
freedom, however, only 
goes so far. 



"The rule is: Don't mess 
with The 'S'," McGuinness 
said with a laugh, noting DC 
Comics is very sensitive 
about Superman's famous 
chest shield. 

with muscles flexed, creat- 
ing a crease in the yellow 
shield, and was told to re- 
draw it. "It's one of the 
world's most recognized 
icons," McGuinness said. 
"It's right up there with 
Mickey Mouse." 

McGuinness ' said his 
plan for the future is just to 
do the best job he can for 
the next two years and then 
see what happens, adding 
that many of his illustrator 
heroes moved on after a two 
year period. "I'm comfort- 
able with the two year 
plan," he said. "I can make a 
nice dent in the character, 
build a fan base. It's a very 
humbling experience to get 
your dream project. It's like, 
'I have my prize, now 
what?'" 

McGuinness said he 
didn't have one favorite 
comic of his own right now 
because he pretty much 

reads everything, although 
he does follow the careers 
and styles of other illustra- 
tors closely. "I look at more 
than I read," McGuinness 
said, adding that Quincy 
Center's New England 
Comics was a frequent stop 
because it was one of the 
best comics stores in the 
area. 

McGuinness, who gradu- 
ated from Stoughton High 
School, lives in Quincy with 
his wife Michelle and their 
two children. 

Asked to give some ad- 
vice to future artists and 
illustrators, McGuinness 
came right to the point: 

"Keep doing what you're 
doing but keep it pure. Be- 
cause there are going to be 
ups and downs, but when it 
becomes just a job, it's just 
not worth it." 

The man of steel couldn't 
have said it better himself. 




EDWARD McGuinness or Quincy, the artist behind the Superman Comics, takes time over 
the weekend to meet fans, sign autographs, and do sketches at New England Comics, Quincy 
Center. ''It's just been an amazing experience," McGuinness says of illustrating the world's 
most famous superhero with no formal art training and at the tender age of 25. 

(Presidential Camera Photos/William Dailey Jr.) 



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THE BOARDWALK EVENT SERIES PRESENTS 
THE FIFTH ANNUAL 




ARTS MFFAIR 

ON THE BOARDWALK AT MARINA BAY 

AUGUST 5-6, 2000 - Qy INCY, MA 

¥lew over 300 woite of ait 00 di^lay featuring aitworic by membeis (^n^ 

local ait associations: Quincy, Mihon, Braintree, Canton, Weymouth, Randc^, The 

Aitists' Circle of the Ftiller Museum in Brockton, Roslindale and West Ro}d)uiy 

Also featured will be: 

A ^edal exhiUt (tf student artwork by the l^oodwanl Sdiod for Giris 

live Artist Demoostratioas oo Sat, lOam-Spm & Siul, lOam-Spm. 

Open FREE to flie public with plenty of FREE parkiogl 

Sponsored by: Otoens Bonk, Thomson & Thomson, Bostm Fmandal Data Services 

Siro's Restauiaitt, Peter & William O'ConneO & Marina Place Assisted Living. 



In Ihe eicnt flf indaiKal 



Ibe cshibil «1 be mowd ID iIk lobi>y of the Gotpooie Piilc Bidifii« loc^ 
tcroai irom iIk IkMidwilL 



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Page 14 TlMi Qulncy Smi Thuraday, July 20, 2000 



Beechwood Harbor Cruise Aug. 2 



The Harbor Cruise 
planned by Beechwood on 
the Bay for Wednesday, 
Aug. 2 at 7 p.m. will benefit 
Quincy's "Older Elders," 
according to Don Uvanitte, 
president of the Beechwood 
board of directors. 

"Quincy has a growing 
senior population as we all 
know," says Uvanitte. 
"Mayor Sheets and the city 
Planning Board identify that 
27 per cent of the city's 
population is over 60, with 
an increasing percentage 
■Jders" (75 



years ani 



'^'olair/- 



These "older elders" of- 
ten have special needs. 
Many "older elders" have a 
combination of needs, ac- 
cording to Sharron Beals , 
executive director of 



Beechwood. Mobility, vi- 
sion, gearing and limiting 
health problems can make it 
difficult to live at home in- 
dependently. 

For almost 20 yeats, she 
notes, Beechwood, working 
closely with the city, has 
provided special services for 
seniors "at risk." The Elder 
Home Repair, designed to 
perform minor home re- 
pairs, enables seniors to 
remain independent in their 
own homes as long as pos- 
sible. 

"Installation of grab bars, 

often makes a critical differ- or $50 for two Vn'd ^e 

ence," said Beals. "Project available at Beechwood and 

SAFE (Smoke Alarms for other locations throughout 

Elders) is another service the city. 

designed to ensure the call 471-5712 for more 

health and safety of our information. 

frailest citizens." 



Increasing numbers of 
"older elders" are remaining 
in their own homes longer 
with in-home assistance, 
said Beals. 

Requests for services 
have doubled in recent years 
at the Community Center. 
Community fundraising is 
essential to the continued 
expansion of the Alz- 
heimer's Association, the 
Elder Home Repair Pro- 
gram, and other citywide 
services for "older elders" 
with special needs. 

Tickets for the three-hour 



Children's Sand Castle Contest 
Saturday At Wollaston Beach 



Tony's Clam Shop will 
host it's annual childrens' 
sand castle contest on Wol- 
laston Beach Saturday, July 
22, from 1 1 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Registration for the an- 
nual event will take place 
across from Tony's Clam 
Shop at 10:30 a.m. the day 
of the event. There is no 
cost to participate. Children 
are encouraged to bring 
their own pails and shovels. 

In past years, the annual 
sand castle contest has at- 
tracted scores of children 
from throughout the city and 
South Shore. Prizes will be 
awarded to winning crea- 
tions, compliments of 
Rhym€ & Reason, the 
Quincy toy store. All chil- 
dren who participate receive 
a coupon for free ice cream 
from Tony's Clam Shop. 



"This is an exciting event 
for us and for local fami- 
lies," said Karen Djerf of 
Tony's Clam Shop located 
on Quincy Shore Drive 
across from the beach. 
"Each year, we look for- 
ward to the smiling faces 
and wonderful sand castles 
that the childen create. It is 
always a fun, festive, family 
event." 

The sand castle contest is 
sponsored by Tony's Clam 
Shop. Matilda's Boardwalk 
Cafe, Rhyme & Reason, 
MDC Wollaston Beach Op- 
erations and the Ward Five 
Community Association. 

The sand castle contest is 
one in a series of recrea- 
tional opportunities spon- 
sored by local civic organi- 
zations, businesses and the 
MDC. Others include: 



Aug. 5, 10 a.m., Wol- 
laston Beach Walk (with 
updates on water quality 
improvement). 

Aug. 22, 10 a.m.. Third 
Annual Wollaston Beach 
Volley Ball Challenge. 

Aug. 23, noon, MDC 
Back to the Beaches Con- 
cert and Family Day. 

In recent years, local 
civic organizations and 
businesses have taken a 
leadership role in sponsor- 
ing recreational events at 
Wollaston Beach for chil- 
dren, adults and families, 
These organizations have 
established a Wollaston 
Beach Cleanup and Recrea- 
tion Fund through which 
these events and beach- 
related educational material 
are produced. 





TVLll 



for 

3 Hour 
Moonti^ht Cruise 

August 2nd 

Marina Bai^ bock 

BOARD - 6:30pm HEMKT 7:00pm 
$35 per person $50 per couple 
to benefit Beechufood's CitifWide 
Inter^enerationat Programming 

Purchase Tickets from: 
Dei/elopment Committee and/or 

Beechu/oad On The Baif 

HO East S<(uantum Street, 

Quincv, MA 02171 

(617)1(71-5712 

COMPUMEmAR]! FOOB! 
bANONG! OJf CASH BAR! 



Puppeteer Donna Marie Performs 
Saturday At Sidewalk Festival 



Puppeteer Donna Marie 
will perform two shows 
Saturday at the 30th Annual 
Quincy Center Sidewalk 
Festival, the first from 11 
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and the 
second from 12 p.m. to 
12:30 p.m. 

Marie, who has per- 
formed several times at the 
festival and has also per- 
formed at the city's Christ- 
mas tree lighting, is a fan 
favorite amongst Quincy 
children, especially ages 3 

executive director of 



QCBPA. "She really draws 
the children into her per- 
formance," Manning says. 
"It's wonderful." 

Marie uses a combina- 
tion of singing, dancing, and 
audience participation to 



engage young children and 
bring them into her world of 
puppetry. 

Alternating in between 
Marie's shows will be 
"Balloon Man" Ken Shur- 
bane. 




PUPPETEER DONNA 
MARIE returns Saturday 
to the Quincy Center 
Sidewalk Festival, using 
singing, dancing, and 
audience interaction to 
entertain the city's 
youngsters. "She's always 
been a fan favorite," says 
QCBPA Executive Director 
Maralin Manning. 

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Thursday, July 20, 2000 TIm Qulnoy Sun Page 15 



Three Days Of Good Buys And Good Fun 

It's Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival Time 



The Sidewalk Festival 
turns 30. 

Yes, the 30th annual 
Quincy Center Sidewalk 
Festival -- a summer tradi- 
tion of good buys, music, 
and entertainment - begins 
today (Thursday)^ for a 
three-day run through Sat- 
urday. 

The event, sponsored by 
the Quiney Center Business 
and Professional Associa- 
tion, will be held on Han- 
cock St., which will be 
closed off to vehicular traf- 
fic from Granite St. up to 
Hancock Ct. 

Shoppers will be able to 
stroll down the middle of 
Hancock St. dotted with 85 
canopied booths and turned 
into a pedestrian mall, lei- 
surely looking over mer- 
chandise in front of stores 
and at vendor and crafters' 
booths. 

"30 years is a milestone, 
a real achievement," said 
QCBPA Executive Director 
Maralin Manning. "This 
year we're in the wake of 
the Tall Ships, but we don't 
need 'perfect 10' weather to 
make our event fun and en- 
tertaining. We have great 
variety in terms of events 
and shopping and we intend 
to make this our best Side- 
walk Festival ever." 

Entertainment and other 
activities are scheduled for 



(Thursday) and Friday and 
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sat- 
urday. 

If you like music, 
downtown is the place to be 
these three days with a vari- 
ety ranging from country 
western to reggae to jazz. 

Featured performers are: 

The Darlings, from 6 
p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday 
night, sponsored by The 
Flatley Company. This na- 
tional award-winning coun- 
try western band makes a 
return appearance after last 
year's successful perform- 
ance. 

Also on Thursday's bill 
will be: The Vibe Jazz 
Quartet with Matthias 
Lupri, Noon to 2 p.m., 
sponsored by Eastern Bank; 
and The George Mel Trio, 
2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., 
sponsored by Atlantic Prop- 
erty Management. 

jah Spirit, from 6 p.m. 
to 8:30 p.m. Friday night, 
sponsored by Sherman Re- 
alty and Congress Ventures 
Group. This exciting, 
acoustic group entertains 
audiences everywhere with 
exuberant, authentic reggae 
music that is sure to please 
listeners of all ages. 

Friday's bill also fea- 
tures: Quincy's own Juli 
Ford, Noon to 2 p.m., spon- 
sored by State Street Bank; 
and Marianne Solivan's 



10 a.m. to 9 p.m. today Jazz Trio, 2:30 to 4:30 



p.m., sponsored by Citizens 
Bank. 

Saturday the entertain- 
ment focuses on the chil- 
dren. Alternating from 11 
a.m. to 1 p.m. there will be 
live entertainment by 
Donna Marie, Puppeteer, 
and Ken Shurbane, The 
Balloon Man. These special 
children's activities are 
sponsored by SAR Engi- 
neering and Harbor Express. 

Also performing Satur- 
day will be The Stephanie 
Stone Ensemble, sponsored 
by Burgin, Plainer, & Hur- 
ley Insurance. 

Throughout the festival 
short children's entertain- 
ment, activities, and karate 
demonstrations are planned, 
as well a police dog demon- 
stration by the Norfolk 
County Sheriff's Office. 

Along with the crafter 
and vendor booths, several 
sampling teams will be on 
hand to introduce their new- 
est taste treats. But to keep 
people from overdoing it, 
the SuperFitness team will 
also be on hand to test 
physical strength and body 
fat status. 

Ample free parking on 
Saturday, Manning added, 
makes this day and place the 
perfect choice to spend time 
with the whole family. 

"It's going to be a great 
event," said Manning. 




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SHOPPERS LEISURELY STROLL down Hancock St. during last year's Quincy Center 
Sidewalk Festival sponsored by the Quincy Center Business Festival sponsored by the Quincy 
Center Business and Professional Association. Hancock St. will again be closed off to 
vehicular traffic, turning it into a three-day pedestrian mall today (Thursday), Friday and 

Saturday. 

(Maralin Manning Photo) 





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Page 16 THm Qulnoy Si&n Thursday, July 20, 2000 



The Festival Committee 



A committee of Quincy 
Center Business and Profes- 
sional Association members 
and staff planned this 30th 
annual Sidewalk Festival. 

Joanne Falco, owner of 
Professional Cuts, Etc., 
chaired the committee 



which included: 

Jeff Bertman, Rogers 
Jewelry; Stephen Blumberg, 
Stephen Leigh Jewelers; 
Caryn Smith, Caryn's Cor- 
ner; Henry Bosworth, The 
Quincy Sun; Bill Morrill, 
Creative Fairs; Deanna 



Gazarian, Phase II; Burt 
Towne, Burgin, Plainer, 
Hurley Insurance; QCBPA 

Executive Director Maralin 
Manning; and Marie Watts, 
QCBPA office secretary. 




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Hancock St. Closed 
For Sidewalk Festival 



Hancock St. from Gran- 
ite St. up to Hancock Ct. 
will be closed to vehicular 
traffic for the three-day 
Quincy Center Sidewalk 
Festival. 

Hancock Ct. itself will be 
open. 

That section of Hancock 
St. was scheduled to be 
closed from midnight 
Wednesday (last night) 
through 8 p.m. Saturday. 

The area will be desig- 
nated a "no parking tow 
zone" during the three days. 

However, during the 
three-day period, time will 
be allowed for vendors and 
crafters to enter the blocked- 
off area to set up booths and 
other equipment and to dis- 
mantle them. 

The Sidewalk Festival, 
the 30th sponsored by the 
Quincy Center Business and 
Professional Association, 
opens today (Thursday) and 
will continue Friday and 
Saturday. 

Entertainment and other 
activities will be from 10 
a.m. to 9 p.m. today and 
Friday and from 10 a.m. to 6 
p.m. Saturday. 




QUINCY SINGER and songwriter Juli Ford wiU appear in 
concert on center stage Friday from noon to 2 p.ni., making 
her first Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival appearance. She 
has a new CD, '^The Quiet House." 



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Thursday, July 20, 2000 Tb* Qulnoy Sun Page 17 



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Page 18 Thm Quinoy Sua Thursday, July 20, 2000 



Children's 'Author Wainright 
At Abigail's Crossing Today 



Noted children's author 
Richard Wainwright will be 
available to sign purchases 
and taUc about his books 
today (Thursday) from 10 
a.m. to 2 p.m. at Abigail's 
Crossing Gifts and Collecti- 
bles, 1350 Hancock St., 
Quincy Center. 

There will also be a spe- 
cial story-time reading of 
Wainright's books by Elaine 
Gibbons, a fifth grade 



teacher at the Merrymount 
Elementary School. 

Wainright's newly re- 
leased book is entitled Mes- 
sengers. 

Wainright's appearance 
is just one of the ways Abi- 
gail's Crossing is marking 
the three-day Quincy Center 
Sidewalk Festival. From 
today (Thursday) until Sat- 
urday there will be face 
painting and balloons avail- 
able for children with funds 



raised through these events 
donated to the Renovation 
Fund for The United First 
Parish Church. 

Abigail's Crossing will 
also specially price several 
gift items, including a se- 
lection of Boyd's Bears. 

Store hours during Side- 
walk Festival Days are to- 
day (Thursday) from 9:30 
a.m. to 7 p.m. and Friday 
and Saturday from 9:30 a.m. 
to 5:30 p.m. 



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THE DARLINGS, a national award winning country western group, take the stage tonight 
(Thursday) at the 30fh Annual Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival. It's a return engagement for 
the group, which is known for live performances with ''heart and Ugh-stepfHug rhythm." 




VIBRAPHONIST MATTHIAS LUPRI leads The Vibe Jazz Quartet today (Thursday) at 
Noon during the Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival on'Hancock St. Lupri, a Berklee College 
graduate who studied with legendary vibraphonist Gary Burton, started on the drums' at age 
12 and has been performing professionally since his teens. 



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Thursday, July 20, 2000 Tikm Quli&oy Sun Page 19 



Dr. Christine Huber 
Chiropractor 

You've heard how good Chiropractic care is for you. 
Discover for yourself just how good you can feel. 

1250 Hancock Street, Quincy 

at Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates 
(617) 774-0595 or (617) 774-0611 

Provider for: Harvard Pilgrim, TUfts, Blue 

Cross, Neighborhood Health, Medicare, 

Mass Health, Motor Vehicle, 

Worker's Compensation and others. 




Test Your High Blood Pressure I.Q. 



Did you know that one in 
five Americans has high 
blood pressure and one-third 
of those affected don't even 
realize they have it? 

High blood pressure, or 
hypertension, is a compli- 
cated, hereditary condition, 
dubbed the "silent killer" 

because of its lack of symp- 
toms, mars ffle oaa 



Children 
Teens 



ROBERT AZRAK, Ed.D. 

Licensed Psychologist 
Mass Bay Counseling, 36 Weston Ave., Quincy 

(617) 786-0137 



Adults 
Families 



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COmPlEn FAMILY HOLTH CARE SERVICFS 

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759 Granite St., Braintree, MA 02 184 (,nuiiirl>l(i/.(inc\i 

(781)848-1950 , lotlirCnnind Round 

DAVID S. EGILMAN, MD, MPH, MEDICAL DIRECTOR 




The good news is that you 
can learn more about high 
blood pressure by taking this 
simple true and false quiz. 

• High blood pressure is 
not a very serious disease. 

False: High blood pres- 
sure directly increases the 
risk of coronary artery dis- 
ease, which leads to heart 
anacK ariu sxixjrc, cspccmn j 

when combined with other 
risk factors. According to the 
American Heart Association, 
hypertension killed 41,634 
Americans in 1996 and con- 
tributed to the deaths of 
about 202,000 Americans. 

• You should get your 
blood pressure check every 
three years. 

False: The American 
Heart Association recom- 
mends a blood pressure 
screening from a physician 
or other qualified health pro- 
fessional, at least once very 
twQ years, and more often if 
you are diagnosed with high 
blood pressure and are tak- 
ing medication. 

• Men are at greater risk 
for developing high blood 
pressure. 

True: Scientists have 
identified a number of risk 




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factors for hypertension, one 
of which is male gender. 
However, high blood pres- 
sure risk isn't directly related 
to a person's sex, but in- 
volves a number of other risk 
factors including: heredity, 
obesity, sodium sensitivity, 
age, heavy alcohol consump- 
tion, and inactive life-style. 

pressure, you feel sick. 

False: Hypertension gen- 
erally does not elicit symp- 
toms. In fact, 3 1 .6 percent of 
people with high blood pres- 
sure are unaware they have 
it. That's why is it so impor- 
tant for patients to stay on 
their high blood pressure 
medication even if they think 
they feel better. When treat- 
ment is stopped, blood pres- 
sure may increase again. 

• All blood pressure 
medications work in the 
some way. 

False: Since no two 
people are alike, a variety of 
antihypertensive medica- 
tions have been developed to 
treat each patient's needs. 
Some medications work to 
reduce excess fluids and salt; 
others work to lower heart 
rate and the heart's output of 



blood. One well-studied 
class of drugs, known as 
ACE inhibitors, reduces 
blood pressure by blocking 
the production of an artery- 
constricting enzyme, which 
results in a reduction in 
blood pressure. Aceon® 
(perindopril erbumine) Tab- 
lets is an ACE inhibitor that 



My Patients Speak For Themselves. 



'Heel pain had made walking extremely painful. I visited two 
orttiopedic surgeons who offered no help. I questioned the ef- 
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pain free. Now, I'm a strong believer of the benefits of acupunc- 
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Quincy, MA 

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protection with once-daily 
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• It is important to have 
24-hour control of high 
blood pressure. 

True: Everyone experi- 
ences normal increases and 
decreases in blood pressure 
throughout the day. For ex- 
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For patients with high blood 
pressure, this could be a con- 
cern if their medication 
doesn't provide full 24-hour 
coverage. Aceon® Tablets 
provide this continuous cov- 
erage. 

If you think you may be 
at risk for high blood pres- 
sure, seek a health care pro- 
vider who can diagnose your 
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style changes that can con- 
trol hypertension. 

Based on pivotal clinical 
studies, Aceon® Tablets has 
been shown to be effective 
and well-tolerated. When 
used in pregnancy, during the 
second and third trimesters, 
ACE inhibitors can cause 
injury or even death to the 
developing fetus. When 
pregnancy is detected, 
Aceon® Tablets should be 
discontinued as soon as pos- 
sible. 



Smoking, 



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Association^ 



f$ 



WE'RE FIGHTING FOR YOUR LIFE 



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BmMPree TedMrIc DeffPa/ 







Dr. Charlene Pirner 
Dr. John S. Vivelros 



ASSOCIATES 



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Hearing aid 




Stephen P. Tobias 

Board Certified Hearing 

Instrument Specialist 



'Tips from Tobias" 

"What is digital"? 

Try and compare counting on 
your fingers to using a 
calculator. Or how about a 
horse and t)uggie to a modem 
automobile. With Digital 
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sounds don't bother you and hearing conversation In 
the presence of noise is better than ever before! Sound 
is more natural and has a CD solvkI quality. When you 
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better because you can hear the very quiet sounds' like 
"p, b, t, k, sh, th and more. There Is nothing better than 
Mother Nature's nomnal, natural hearing. The next best 
thing is a digital hearing aki. Sure, they are rriore 
expensive; quality always is. Analog hearing aids are 
still available, but they have always fallen short and 
many have ended up in the drawer. Rnd out if you're a 
cemdidate with a free hearing test! Nowyougoand 
spread the news! Steve 

Stephen Tobias Hearing Center 

488 Quincy Ave, Quincy, MA 02169 (next to shipyard) 
Have any topics for upcoming Tips'7 
Write or call 617 770-3395 



Page 20 Tbm Quiiusy Sun Thursday, July 20, 2000 




Real Estate 





South Shore Association Of Realtors 
Holds Annual Awards Reception 



The South Shore Associa- Baker announced this year's 

lion of Reakors® recently recipient of the Realtor® of 

held its annual award cer- the Year 2000 award is Jo- 

emonies at Amelia's, Marina seph P. Clancy, owner of 

Bay, Quincy. Century 2 1 Tullish & Clancy 

^^j-kiK 1 iwaiuciii juycc near estate, inc. A coin- 



BRIAN MALONEY and Mike King, Bank of America affliate 
of the year 2000, receives plaque from Atty. Thomas Williams, 
1999 AfTdiate of the Year, at the South Shore Association of 
Realtors® annual awards reception held at Amelia's, Marina 
Bav. 




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0^ (617) 328-9400 ^ 



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QUINCY 328-3200 



JOSEPH CLANCY, 2000 Realtor of the Year, receives plaque 
from Patricia Sullivan, 1999 Realtor of the Year. 



Wlii'ii liu\in;4(ir SilHiii^, Think. 





GUSCONFALONE 
Re'al Estate Consultant 



Annex Realty, Inc. 

49 Beale St., Quincy, MA 02170 
617-472-4330 ext. 310 
Call Gus for a FREE 
Market Evaluation 
of your property 



Centurion 
Broker 




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617-306-0668 



128 Mayor McGrath Highway, 
Quincy, MA 02169 

617-328-1312 
Fax:617-328-6775 



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memorative plaque was pre- 
sented by Patricia SulKvan, 
the 1999 award recipient. 
Clancy was recognized 

for ouLstandinp. Jip.rvirp anH 
cofitributTon to the real estate 

profession as well as to the 
South Shore Association of 
Realtors®. A Board member 
since 1973 and a Life Mem- 
ber since 1998, he is a past 
Director of the Board, former 
Grievance Committee mem- 
ber, and currently serves on 
the Budget and Finance and 
Professional Standards 
Committees, and Multiple 
Listing Service. Under 
Clancy's enthusiastic leader- 
ship the Century 21 tullish & 
Clancy Real Estate Com- 
pany has thrived for 27 years 
as a successful business in 
the communities of Quincy 
and Weymouth, and has 
achieved Centurion status in 
the Century 2 1 system for the 
past three years. 



PMI - (iONE 



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472-4330 



Clancy's community as^ 
sociations include member- 
ship in Weymouth Rotary, 
sponsoring youth soccer and 

of Columbus and Golf 
League, and the South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce. 
Over 1 25 people joined in 
the celebration including 
Clancy's wife Geraldine, 
their sons and daughters and 
spouses, several other fam- 
ily members, many friends, 
office associates, and SSAR 
board staff. He was feted as 
a dedicated family man, past 
coach of his son's Little 
League teams, generously 
and patiently sharing his ex- 
perience and guidance to ev- 
eryone in his life. 

Clancy has been nomi- 
nated for the Massachusetts 
Realtor® of the Year Award 
to be presented in September 
at the Massachusetts Asso- 
ciation of Realtors® Con- 
vention in North Falmouth. 

The SSAR Affiliate of the 
Year 2000 was awarded to 
Bank of America representa- 
tives Brian Maloney and 
Michael King for iheir out- 
standing contributions to 
SSAR. The honor was ac- 
cepted for ongoing support 
throughout their years of 
SSAR membership begin- 
ning in 1996, and for their 
generous sponsorship of 
board activities and celebra- 
tions such as holiday galas, 
affiliate breakfasts, Realtor® 
after Hours gatherings and 
annual meetings. 




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J. 4 



Page 21 



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Page 22 Tli« QvUncy Sua Thunday, July 20, 2000 



S[>OETS 




Granite Etch First 
EFL Win, 29-0 



DIANNE KANE-McGONIGLE of Quincy was recenUy thanked by the Jimmy Fund for befaig 
one of the 1386 ''Pacesetters" — those who raised $500 or more to benefit the Jimmy Fund in the 
1999 Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk. More than $2.8 million was raised for last year's 



event. 



Diane Kane-McGonigle 
Jimmy Fund Walk 'Pacesetter' 



Dianne Kane-McGonigle 
of Quincy was among the 
1 ,386 people recently recog- 
nized by the Jimmy Fund at 
the annual Boston Marathon 
Jimmy Fund Walk 
"Pacesetter" reception. 

Walkers in the annual 
fund-raiser for the Jimmy 
Fund who raise $500 or more 
are designated Pacesetters. In 
last year's event. Pacesetters 
accounted for 20 percent of 
the participants, yet they 



r 



raised 77 percent of the $2.8 
million given to the Jimmy 
Fund. 

Presented by Sovereign 
Bank, this year's walk, 26.2 
miles from Hopkinton to 
Boston, will be held Sunday, 
Sept. 24. The event, accom- 
modating 7,500 walkers, also 
offers 13.1- and 3-mile op- 
tions. 

All walkers must raise a 
minimum of $ 1 00 in pledges, 
which goes toward cancer 



research and care at the Dana- 
Farber Cancer Institute. In 
addition to being recognized 
as a Pacesetter for raising 
$500 or more, designations 
of bronze ($ 1 ,500 to $2,499), 
silver ($2,500 to $3,499), 
gold ($3,5p0-$4,999) and 
platinum ($5,000 and up) are 
acknowledged. 

For more information 
about the Boston Marathon 
Jimmy Fund Walk, call 1- 
800-632-3562. 



By CHRIS POISSON 

Backed by an impregnable 
defense, the Quincy Granite 
notched their first win in the 
Eastern Football League by 
pitching a 29-0 shutout over 
the Hyannis Hurricanes Sat- 
urday at the Cape. 

The city hasn't seen a bet- 
ter defense since the Cold 
War era, when the Quincy- 
bom USS Salem was the 
Flagship of the U.S. Navy's 
Sixth Fleet. 

After a 20-8 loss to the 
Boston Cowboys in the sea- 
son opener, Quincy ( 1 - 1 ) re- 
furbished its game as the de- 
fense limited the first-year 
team to one first down (that 
isn't a typo). That's like hold- 
ing Jordan to under lOpoints. 

'There were a lot of three- 
and-outs," said David Har- 
ris, the teams co-founder and 
offensive lineman. 

"The whole defense was 
spectacular," said coach Ken 
McPhee as he watched his 
Big D record five sacks, force 



two fumbles and score a 
safety. 

The Granite will need that 
same defense Saturday when 
they battle rival (yes rival) 
Mass Havoc at 7 p.m. at Vet- 
erans Memorial Stadium. 
Last season, the Havoc beat 
the Granite twice, including 
a win in the NEFL Division 
Championship game. 

"This is a big week," Har- 
ris sad. 'The Havoc game is 
going to be the biggest game 
of the season. It's for all of 
us. We're going to try to up- 
set them and not let them get 
the hat trick." 

With a full week of prac- 
tice, quarterback Mike Tho- 
mas, filling in for Liam 
Higgins (head injury) and J.R. 
Rendle (broken collar bone), 
and the offense clicked to the 
tune of 20-first half points. 

Tail back Bernard Lynch 
scored Quincy's first touch- 
down when he ran one in 
from six yards out. The Gran- 
ite wentup 14-Oon Thomas's 



14-yard keeper, his second 
touchdown run of the sea- 
son. 

Thomas then connected 
with tail back Jackson Vetiac 
for a touchdown on a 28- 
yard screen pass, his first TD 
pass of the season. The PAT 
was no good. 

"It was a big improvement 
offensively," McPhee said. 
"We had much better offen- 
sive series. I thought the of- 
fensive line improved tre- 
mendously. But we still have 
a lot of work to do. You can 
never be satisfied." 

In the second half, Brian 
Vaughn returned the open- 
ing kick off 82 yards for a 
touchdown, giving C^incy a 
27-0 lead after the PAT. 
(^incy took out its starters 
and played its newcomers the 
rest of the game. 

Defensive end Steve Jones 
came up with a safety on the 
last play of the game to ac- 
count for the final "Score. 




American 
Red Cross 

Went be there. 



15^^ Annual 
Golf Classic 



Monday, July 24, 2000, 1pm 

South Shore Country €lub 

Hingham, Massoihusetts 
— SCHEDUU OF Evans — 



12:0WIII Sign-in A box lunA 
l:00|pm SMsron Start 

Followed bf Dinner 9t Awmds 
$125 donoHon laclvdles; 

£)dif Sreen Fee, Onft he, Dbma^f Prues, &Hs 
HOLE IN ONE PRl:^! 
feif Play&rs or ^^onsors shoM tontaa 
Chaimum, Jerry DmeY at 
v/ Federal Sowings Bank $17-471-0750 



Vic DiGravio Jr. Memorial 
Golf Tournament Aug. 7 



The first Vic DiGravio 
Jr. Memorial Golf Tourna- 
ment will be held Monday, 
Aug. 7 at the South Shore 
Country Club in Hingham. 

The tournament is being 
held in the memory of Vic 
DiGravio who died of can- 
cer last year. 

It will be a scramble for- 
mat with a 1 p.m. shotgun 
start. Dirmer will be served 
after the tournament at ap- 
proximately 6: 15 p.m. Entry 
fee is $ 1 00 per person, which 
includes greens fees, cart, 
golf shirt and dinner. For 



those attending just the din- 
ner, the donation is $30 per 
person. 

Registration deadline is 
Monday, July 31. 

All proceeds will fund the 
Vic DiGravio Jr. Memorial 
Scholarship at Bridgton 
Academy in North Bridgton, 
Maine. The scholarship pro- 
vides financial aid to students 
from Quincy and Weymouth 
who attend Bridgton. 
DiGravio graduated from 
Bridgton Academy in 1959. 

DiGravio grew up in 
Weymouth and attended 



Weymouth High School 
where he was an outstanding 
athlete. After marrying, he 
lived in Quincy where he 
owned and operated the 
Sportlight Tavern for over 
20 years. 

Entry fees and/or dona- 
tions can be sent to the Vic 
DiGravio Jr. Memorial Golf 
Tournament, 89 Puritan 
Drive, C^incy 02169. 

For more information 
about the tournament, call 
VicDiGravioinat(617)328- 
8170, or Sean Downing at 
(617)472-5746. 



Shea's Bertoni Memorial 
Golf Tournament Sept. 11 



The Bill Shea's 12th an- 
nual Bertoni Memorial Golf 
Tournament will be held 
Monday, Sept. 1 1 at the 
Halifax Country Club to ben- 
efit the Quincy Animal Shel- 
ter. 

The tournament will tee- 
off at 8 a.m. The event will 
also feature various golfing 
contests and raffles, such as 
a longest drive, closest to the 
pin and hole-in-one for a 



chance to win a new Buick. 
There will be an awards lun- 
cheon following the tourna- 
ment. 

■ Proceeds will be used to 
feed, pay medical bills and 
rehab the shelter for the ani- 
mals. The tournament will be 
run with the help of Siro's 
Restaurant, C^iincy Animal 
Shelter, Bill Shea of Shea's 
Coriam, Jeff Sweeney of 
Sweeney Brothers Home for 



ROUND BALL 
NOOP CANP 

POR BOYS & CilllLS 

INSTRUCTION ikHO t^ikHUt 

JULY dVAUOUST 4 §k^K d-11 

AUCiUST 7-11 ACilS 12*16 

PON 3N0CNUNI CALL 

TCD STCVINSON d2d-d409 

jiT«i;i,i»f9Tir»» 



' 1 1 



Funerals and Sue Deegain. 

Those interested in play- 
ing in the tournament, or 
would like more information, 
are asked to call Bill Shea at 
(617) 326-1266 or Sue 
Deegan at (617) 376-2001. 

Manets 

Registration 

Saturday 

The Houghs Neck Mar»ts 
pill hold their second regis- 
iration for football players 
and cheerleaders Satorday at 
LaBreque Park from 9-11 
ium. 

Cost is $85. 

Pot more information, 
^ Carol Virtue at 773- 
^73. . 



■■■■ 



Thursday, July 20, 2000 Tli* Quincsy Sun Page 23 




SHEILA BUONAUGURIO Oeft) and Linda Slice, both of the Mayor's Commission on the 
Family, ride in a golf cart at the Mulligan Golf Tourney. 




ROBERT CORLEY (center) was the chief organizer of the Mulligan Golf Tourney. He is shown 
here with Phil Mangano (left), president of Massachusetts Housing and Shelter Alliance, and 
Norm Grenier, executive director of Quincy Neighborhood Housing Services. 




JAY DAVIS of Graeber and Davis takes a swing at the recent Mulligan Golf Tourney held at the 
Pembroke Country Club. Davis, a board member of the QNHS, was an organizer of the fund- 
raising tournament 



THE MULLIGAN GOLF Tourney, held at the Pembroke Country Club, recently raised $15,000 
for homeless families in Quincy. From the left. Norm Grenier, executive director of Quincy 
Neighborhood Housing Services; Linda Stice, executive director of the Mayor's Commission on 
the Family; Debbie Kidd, housing coordinator of QNHS; Kay Wagner, Commission on the 
Family case worker. 



Golf Tourney Raises $15,000 For Homeless Families 



Over $15,(X)0 was raised 
for the homeless families of 
Quincy at the Mulligan Golf 
Tourney held recently at the 
Pembroke Country Club 

Over 100 golfers partici- 
pated, and over 125 people 
attended the evening meal 
and took part in the silent 
auction and raffle. 



The tournament came 
about when the Quincy 
Neighborhood Housing Ser- 
vices and the Mayor's Com- 
mission on the Family began 
working together to create a 
"second step" program that 
would provide safe and af- 
fordable homes for homeless 
families. 



During their association, 
they agreed that the commu- 
nity needed opportunities to 
work on correcting this prob- 
lem. That's when Atty. Jay 
Davis of Graeber and Davis, 
a QNHS board member, 
stepped forward and offered 
to run a golf tournament fund- 



raiser. 



A committee — Leo 
Sheehan, Bob Foy, David 
Kilnapp, Elizabeth 

Harrington, Dick Peterson, 
all of QNHS, and Linda Stice 
of the Mayor's Commission 
on the Family — was formed 
and it decided to call the tour- 
nament the Mulligan Golf 
Toumey. 



In golf, a Mulligan is an 
opportunity to take an unde- 
sirable shot over. The chance 
to start over is what home- 
less families need and what 
the two agencies try to pro- 
vide. 

Stice spoke of the Mayor' s 
Commission on the Family ' s 



work with homeless fami- 
lies, pointing out that some 
Quincy school children were 
living in cars before entering 
this program. 

Robert Corley of QNHS 
was the chief organizer of 
the event. He announced next 
year' s event will be held June 
15. 



Comeback Not In Forecast As Morrisette Bows Out 



By CHRIS POISSON 

The Morrisette American 
Legion baseball team disap- 
peared as heavy fog blan- 
keted Quincy Sunday night 
— literally and figuratively. 

With the best-of-three 
Zone 6 playoff series against 
No, 4 seed Westwood knot- 
ted at one game apiece, 
Morrisette's sure-handed 
defense vanished like a sand 
castle swept away by a wave, 
committing seven errors in a 
season-ending 9-4 loss at 
Adams Field. 

"[The weather] was bad," 
said manager Ray Cattaneo. 
"We lost two or three balls 
up in the fog. It was like that 
for both sides, but we didn't 
get them up In the air like 
they did. When I think back, 
I think we should' ve can- 
celed it around the fourth in- 
ning. The conditions just 



didn't make it a good game." 
With a 4- 1 lead in the sev- 
enth inijing, Westwood 
opened the game up with five 
runs (four unearned) off 
pitcher Matt McCann (4-3, 2 
saves) for a commanding 9- 1 
lead. Morrisette, the second 
seed, pushed three runs 
across the plate in the bottom 
half, but a comeback was not 
in the forecast. 

After rallying from a 4-0 
deficit to take the first game 
of the series, 5-4, Friday at 
Adams Field, Morrisette 
seemed to be in position to 
win the first-round match- 
up. But the pitching collapsed 
in a 16-7 meltdown in Game 
2, followed by the defense in 
Game 3. 

"It was a good year," 

Cattaneo said. "We had our 

moments. But I would like to 

. .go lopger in the playoffs and 



keep playing in July. It's 
tough to end like this after 
winning the first game and 
coming back like that. They 
probably got the confidence 
to beat us after Saturday's 
game when we lost 16-7." 

Although the postseason 
leaves a bitter taste, Cattaneo 
can find some positives from 
the season. Morrisette, which 
finished the season at 15-8, 
recovered from a mid-sea- 
son swoon by winning six of 
its final seven regular season 
games. Brian O'Hanley, the 
15-year-old rookie, led the 
team in hitting. And Keith 
Doherty emerged as one of 
the league's premier pitch- 
ers. 

"I'm not surprised with 

Keith," Cattaneo said. "He 

works at it. He plays a lot of 

ball. That's his sport. 

I'J^J^J'l^X y^ .1"jte. a .sur-, . 



prise. He led the team in hit- 
ting as a 1 5 year old. I can see 
Doherty in the next two years 
dominating this league. And 
I can see O'Hanley doing the 
same." 

In Game 2, Morrisette fell 
behind 7-0 after one inning 
but chipped away to even the 
score. T.J. Bell scored the 
first run in the second inning 
when Joe Duffy was hit by a 
pitch with the bases load. In 
the third. Bell sU-oked a two- 
run double to make it 7-3. In 
the fifth, Doherty ripped an 
RBI double. Bell crushed a 
two-run home run and Adam 
Goodrich added an RBI 
single. 

In the bottom of the fifth, 
Westwood pocketed an eight 
ball, scoring eight runs as it 
sent 12 men to the plate. 
Game over. 
« loi the opening game. 



Doherty (5-1) went the dis- 
tance, allowing three runs on 
five hits while punching out 
10. 

Down 4-0, Morrisette 
scored a run in the third and 
fourth to cut the lead to 4-2. 
In the fifth, it scored three 
runs, all with two outs, to 
take the lead. Rob Celata had 
a two-run double and Doherty 
an RBI double. 

In the final game of the 
regular season, Morrisette 
pulled out a 7-6 win over 
Milton in eight innings as 
Celata knocked in Pat Bregoli 
with one out for the game- 
winning run. 



Celata (5- 1 ) picked up the 
win in relief with 1 1/3 in- 
nings of two-hit ball. Joe 
Flynn started the game and 
tossed three scoreless in- 
nings, while Bell gave up two 
runs in his 3 2/3 innings of 
work. 

Doherty went 3 for 4 with 
two RBI and O'Hanley went 
3 for 5 with an RBI to power 
the offense. Bregoli, Celata, 
Chris Doherty and John 
Gavin all knocked in runs. 

Save Gas & Nloaay . . . 
. . . Shop Localy 




WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 

American Heart ^^ 
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Page 24 The Qiainoy Sim Thursday, July 20» 2000 



Crime 
Watch 

By ROBERT HANNA 
Crime Prevention Officer 
Quincy Police Department 





Shoplifting ~ 
Employee IVaining 

Your employees are your first line of defense against shop- 
lifting. Instruct employees to be suspicious of the follow- 
ing: 

• Customers who hang around and handle items, making 
no attempt to buy anything, or customers who do not appear 
to be interested in items about which they have inquired. 

• Customers who keep one hand constantly in an outer 
coat pocket. 

• Customers who seem to be watching store personnel 
very closely. 

• The potential shoplifter may keep maneuvering to get in 
a position or location free of customers - or will stop what- 
ever he/she is doing when a customer or clerk is near. 

• When a shoplifter is acting in a suspicious manner, you 
or your employee should approach and ask, "May I help 
you?" This is one of the best deterrents to a potential shop- 
lifter. 

• Watch the hands ~ the hands to the stealing. One hand 
may be innocently above the counter while the other is busily 
engaged in sliding merchandise into a concealed box. 

Next Week: Guidelines to follow when dealing with shop- 
lifters 

• From: National Crime Prevention Council 

Jaehnig Club 

Captures Third 

AL Championship 



The Jaehnig Club (17-5) 
recently captured its third 
consecutive American 
League championship — its 
sixth out of the last seven 
seasons — by closing out the 
year with five straight wins. 
Jaehnig Chiropractic — 8 
Lions Club — 2 

Mo Al-Khatib smashed a 
long home run and had five 
RBI, and he also picked up 
the win on the mound. Tom 
Pasq'uontonio, Mike 

O'Mahoney and Jeff Davis 
had clutch hits. 

For Lions Club, Drew 
Loud had two hits while 
Stephan Kane and Joe Berlo 
each had one. 

Jaehnig Chiropractic — 9 
Colonial Federal — 1 

Christopher Garvey 
pitched an excellent game, 
scattering two hits over five 
innings. He also added a two- 
run single. Jonathan Allen 
went 3 for 3 with two doubles 
and Rob Dolbec and Tom 
Pasquontonio had two hits 
each. 

For Colonial Federal, 
Raymond Marchard cracked 
two hits and Mike Jay was 
impressive offensively and 
defensively. 

Jaehnig Chiropractic — 11 
Police — 4 

Robbie Dolbec (2 
doubles, triple). Mo Al- 
Khatib (2 doubles, single) 
and Matt Jaehnig (2 hits) led 
an offensive explosion. 
Kevin IkMiovan improved his 



pitching record to 7-1 on the 
season. Chris Maguire had a 
single and played well at 
third. Jim Garrigan smashed 
a triple and Nick Al-Khatib 
belted a two-run double. Jeff 
Davis had a hit in his third 
straight game. 

For Police, Kevin Bossart 
and Corey Wynne had two 
hits each. Glenn Misho was a 
vacuum cleaner at third base. 
Jaehnig Chiropractic — 7 
Burgin Platner — 6 

Jaehnig Club jumped out 
to a 7-0 lead, but had to fend 
off a hungry Burgin Platner 
squad, which rallied for six 
runs in the last inning. Matt 
Jaehnig picked up the save as 
he struck out two batters in 
the last inning with the tying 
run at the plate. Steve Matos 
was sharp in his pitching de- 
but and he had a single. Jon 
Allen had two hits and three 
RBL 

For Burgin Platner, Mike 
Powers, Kevin Adams and 
Jim Fitzpatrick had nice hits. 
Jaehnig Chiropractic — 5 
Burke Club — 2 

Mo Al-Khatib tossed a 
one-hitter and Kevin 
Donovan smacked two triples 
to pace the victory. Jon Allen 
tripled, Mike O'Mahoney 
had two hits and Steve Matos 
hit safely. 

For Burke Cluh, Joe Grif- 
fin had the lone hit. Lammie 
Papalambros played an out- 
standing defensive game at 
shortstop. 



Monday. July 10 

UNARMED ROBBERY, 7:44 a.ni., 460 Quincy Ave., 
South Shore Mental Health. Party was assaulted and robbed 
in parking lot. 

LARCENY, 10:30 a.ni.,'214 Washington St, Cagney*s 
Restaurant. Money taken, cleaners suspected. On July 11, 
one cleaner was caught stealing $30. 

LARCENY, 10:31 a.iii., 43 Island Ave. Resident reports 
the theft of a large amount of money. 

BREAK, 1:46 p.ni., 164 Quincy Shore Dr., Louisburg 
Square. Two units broken into. A TV and VCR were among 
the items taken. 

LARCENY, 1:52 p.in., 164 Marlboro St One flag sto- 
len from home. 

'fliesdayy .Ttt!y 11 

VANDALISM, 7:39 a.in., 1241 Hancock St, Kids 
Closet. Window broken overnight. 

LARCENY, 9:33 p.m., 60 Murphy Memorial Dr., 
Quincy Youth Arena. Party reports a credit card and cash 
stolen. 

ASSAULT & BATTERY, 333 Victory Rd., Water 
Works. A 29-year-old Quincy man was arrested for Assault 
& Battery on a Police Officer and Resisting Arrest. 
Wednesday. July 12 

BREAK, 6:04 a.m., 118 East Elm Ave. Resident awoke 
to find cellar door kicked in. 

BREAK, 4:04 p.m., 205 Taffrail Rd. Apartment broken 
into. Officer Zupkofska to file complaints for Breaking and' 
Entering as well as Attempted Arson. 

VANDALISM, 4:28 p.m., 109 Garfield St. A Toyota was 
damaged while parked here. 

Thursday. July 13 

LARCENY, 8:49 a.m., 48 Prospect St. Resident reports 
the theft of a $700 bracelet. 

BREAK, 8:57 a.m., 117 Quincy St. Apartment broken 
into. 

ATTEMPTED LARCENY, 8:37 p.m., 301 Falls Bou- 
levard, Wal-Mart Report a Hispanic male wearing an or- 
ange "t" shirt tried to steal a computer. Suspect was chased 
by store security and dropped the computer. 

LARCENY, 10:27 p.m., 793 Quincy Shore Dr., Hot Rod 
Harry's. Money stolen from tip jar. 
Frida y , Jul y 1 4 

VANDALISM, 7:47 p.m., 74 Summit Ave., Furnace 
Brook Golf Club. Fence torn down at Belmont & South 
Central Ave. 

LARCENY, 8:00 p.m., 234 Hancock St., Wash & Dry. 



Party reports his clothing was stolen from Laundromat. 
Saturday. .Tulv 15 

VANDALISM, 11:40 p.m., Ross Parkingway, 96 
Parkingway. Party reports his vehicle vandalized while 
parked at this location. 

Sunday. Julv 16 

LARCENY, 3:48 p.m., 215 Quincy Ave., Bradtees. Se- 
curity reports two females left the store after taking items. 
Officer Linskey responded and arrested two females on 
Quincy Ave. 

BREAK, 6:44 a.m., 160 Holbrook Rd. 

BREAK, 8:07 p.m., 103 Elm St Apartment broken into. 

Total Calls for Service : 1452 

Total Stolen Cars: 5 

Total Arrests : 31 

If you have information on the above crimes, or any crime, 
please call the Quincy Police Detective Bureau at 617-745- 
5764. If you wish to report suspected drug activity, call the 
Drug Hot-Line at 328-4527. You will not be required to 
identify yourself, but it could help. If you wish to contact 
the Crime Prevention Officer for tips or comments, my 
direct line is 617-745-5719. My e-mail address is 
bhanna@ci.quincy.ma.us~C>j9^cer Robert Hanna. 



STOLEN CARS 




Date Stolen Frpm 


Year/Make/Model 


7/15 394 Water St. 


1997 Honda Accord 


7/15 Arlington & Brook Sts. 


1993 Lincoln Mk VII 


7/11 Huntley Rd. 


1990 


Toyota Camry 


7/10 9 Blackwell St. 


1989 Buick Electra 


7/10 10 Weston Ave. 


1997 Honda Civic 


BREAKDOWN OF ARRESTS 


Assault & Battery on a Police Officer 


1 


Assault & Battery 




4 


Warrant Arrests 




9 


Larceny by Check 




2 


Threat to Commit Crime 




1 


Protective Custody 




5 


Possession of Class "B" Drugs 




•2 


Possession of Class "D" Drugs w/intent 


1 


Violation of Probation 




2 


Failure to Stop for a Police Officer 




1 


Disturbing the Peace 




1 


Disorderly Conduct 




1 


Armed Assault w/Intent to Murder 




1 



Babe Ruth Tourney Starts Here Friday 



Starting tomorrow (Fri- 
day) and running through 
July 29, Quincy will host a 
double-elimination 14-year- 
old Babe Ruth State Tour- 
nament at Adams Field. 

Teams from Quincy, 
Lynn, Reading, Medford, 
Parkway West Roxbury, 
Norwood, Taunton and Ply- 
mouth will be competing in 



the tournament. 

Donations are $3 daily, or 
$8 for a tournament pass. 

Games will start (tomor- 
row) Friday at 4 p.m. with 
opening ceremonies at 7 p.m. 
followed by a game at 7:30 
p.m. Saturday and Sunday 
games will begin at 1 p.m., 4 
p.m. and 8 p.m. Monday and 
Tuesday games at 5:30 p.m. 



and 8 p.m. Wednesday will 
be an off-day or a makeup 
date. Next Thursday and Fri- 
day, games will be at 8 p.m. 
And if necessary, there will 
be a game at noon next Satur- 
day. 

Quincy' s opening game 
will be Saturday at 8 p.m. 

The Quincy roster in- 
cludes: Bill Cosgrove, Dan 



Cosgrove, Dom Delgardo, 
Matt Germain, Josh Hersey , 
Chris Kirschner, Brendan 
MacDonald, Andy 

McAllister, Joe Priscella, 
Steve Reardon, Mark 
Tobin, Tim Watson, Steve 
Williams, manager Pete 
Williams and coaches Steve 
Reardon and Dick 
Lombardi. 



Babe Ruth All-Stars In State Tournament 



The Quincy 13-year-old 
Babe Ruth All-Stars begin 
state tournament play today 
(Thursday) against Lawrence 
at 5:45 p.m. at Kelly Field in 
Milton. 

Despite falling to Park- 
way, 4-3, in the District 4 
Championship, Quincy 
earned a spot in the eight- 
team tourney by finishing 
with a 3-2 overall record. 

In the final, Quincy 
grabbed a 2-0 first-inning 
lead over Parkway on RBI 
singles by Steve Priscella and 
Justin Thorley. Dave Jaehnig 
baffled Parkway, allowing 
only two hits in four score- 
less innings before tiring in 
the fifth. 

Dave Pellegrin's bases 
loaded double in the fifth 
cleared the bases for Park- 
way. Quincy staged a mini 
rally in the seventh, cutting 



the lead to 4-3 on Dean 
Sandonato's RBI single. 
Quincy, however, left the 
bases loaded to end the game. 

Quincy opened the Dis- 
U-ict tournament with a 6-3 
win over a strong Braintree 
team, riding the arm of 
Sandonato, who pitched a 
complete game. 

Down 1-0 in the first, lead- 
off hitter Kevin Richardson 
ripped a triple and scored on 
a wild pitch. Quincy broke 
open the game, stringing five 
hits together for four runs in 
the fourth. Nick Malvesti had 
an RBI single while Chris 
Marinelli's single plated two 
runs. » 

Malvesti's RBI single in 
the sixth closed out the scor- 
ing for Quincy. Malvesti had 
two hits as did Jaehnig and > 
Sandonato. 

John Folino threw a mas- 



terful game in Quincy' ^8-1 
win over Duxbury. Quincy 
again used a big inning, scor- 
ing five runs in the fifth with 
Priscella, Malvesti and Matt 
Tobin (2 RBI) delivering base 
hits. 

Thorley had a good day 
with two hits and a flawless 
seventh inning in relief. 
Richardson shined behind the 
plate, throwing out two run- 
ners attempting to steal. 

Quincy dropped a well- 
played, extra-inning game to 
Parkway, 3-2. Sandonato 
turned in another strong per- 
formance, limiting Parkway 
to two hits in seven innings. 
Quincy held a 1-0 lead 
through five innings. 
Sandonato drove in 
Richardson (Single, stolen 
base) in the first. 

Parkway took the lead in 
the sixth by scoring two runs 



without a hit. Quincy an- 
swered in its half when 
Richardson doubled, stole 
third and scored on an error. 
Sandonato stole second and 
was thrown out at home on 
Folino's single. Parkway 
scored the winning run on a 
single, a walk and a sacrifice 
fly. 

Quincy advanced to the 
finals by knocking off 
Braintree, 6-5, as Folino spun 
a three-hitter in six innings 
of work. Quincy used another 
big inning to take a 5-0 lead. 

Malvesti (3 hits) laced a 
double to left and scored on 
Folino's RBI single. Walks 
to Marinelli and Jaehnig and 
a single by Tobin scored two 
runs while Thorley' s single 
accounted for two more runs. 

Braintree closed within 6- 
5 before Jaehnig got the final 
two outs. 



mmm 



Thursday, July 20, 2000 TIm Quinoy Sun Page 25 



I^ELieieN 



Bethany Congregational 



The Rev. William 
Harding, pastor, will conduct 
both worship services on 
Sunday at Bethany Congre- 
gational Church, Quincy 
Center. 

The first service will be at 
8:30 a.m. in the Bethany 
Chapel on Spear St. The sec- 
ond service at 10 a.m. will be 
in the Bethany sanctuary. His 
sermon topic is "Different 
As Night and Day." 

Scripture reader will be 



Joanne French. Lu Ann Mina, 
soprano, will be the soloist 
with Thomas Boyer, organ- 
ist. 

Greeter will be Janet 
Hassler. 

Fellowship Hour will fol- 
low the service in Allen Par- 
lor. Light refreshments will 
be available. 

The One Room Church 
School will be open and 
childcare will be available 
for infants and toddlers. 



Houghs Neck Congregational 



Houghs Neck Congrega- 
tional Church. 310 Manet 
Ave., will observe Scholar- 
ship Sunday at the 9:30 a.m. 
worship service with schol- 
arships presented to, students 
entering college or graduate 
school. 



Presentations will be 
made by Edwina Robinson, 
treasurer, Scholarship Board, 
for the Houghs Neck Con- 
gregational Church. 

Dr. Peter V. Corea will 
give the sermon. 



The Lord's Planting 

Pastor Bill Donahue will Prayer meeting, 7:30 to 

preach the sermon, "Fueling 8:30 a.m.; Children's Cin- 

YourSpiritual Ambition," at ema and Breakfast, Teens 

the 9:30 and 1 1 a.m. services Sunday School, Adult Bible 

Sunday at The Lord' s Plant- Class, Discipleship Classes, 

ing, Quincy Foursquare lOto 11 a.m.; and Children's 



Church, 65 Newbury Ave., 
North Quincy. 

Those needing transpor- 
tation to the church can call 
847-4444. Child care is avail- 



Sunday School, 1 1 :30 a.m. 
to 12:30 p.m. 

Family night willije held 
today (Thursday) at 7 p.m. 
featuring Adult Bible Study, 



able during service times. Youth Group ( 6th- 12th 

The church is handicap ac- grade) and Pioneer Club (kin- 

cessible. dergarten through fifth 

Also scheduled Sunday: grade). 

Pastors Plan Retreat 
, To White Mountains 

Pastor John Swanson of gland. In addition to the 

Union Congregational physical benefits, the 

Church, WoUaston and Pas- monthly two-day, three or 

tor Robert Kilieffer of First four mountains climbed, aide 

Baptist Church of Braintree, in spiritual development, 
are seeking membership in This week the pastors will 

the "Four Thousand Footer climb several peaks in the 



Club of New England." 

To be eligible for mem- 
bership, one must climb all 
of the 60 peaks in New En- leadership is planned. 

'Divorce And Beyond' Program 



Zealand Valley. In Septem- 
ber a men's retreat in the 
White Mountains under their 



The Catholic parishes in 
Quincy will offer an eight- 
week program, "Divorce and 
Beyond" beginning Tuesday, 
July 25 at St. John the Baptist 
parish, 7 to 9 p.m. 

The program is designed 
to assist persons who are di- 
vorced or in the process of 



divorcing deal with the many 
emotions which may arise 
during this time. 

Requested fee for the pro- 
gram is $40; space is limited 
to 15 participants. 

For more information, call 
St. John's at 617-773-1021. 



Inner Peace Seminar Aug. 3 



A^eminar entitled "Inner 
Peace: The Journey to 
Wholeness" will be held 
Thursday, Aug. 3 from 7 to 
8:30 p.m.. Ill Willard St. 
(lower level), Quincy. 

The seminar will be pre- 
sented by MaryBeth Scalice, 



M.A., Ed. D. 

Focus will be on health, 
wholeness and happiness. 

It is sponsored by Milton 
Chiropractic and Rehabilita- 
tion and the Foundation of 
Open Hearts, a non-profit 
corporation. 



WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



Smoking. 



American Heart 
AssodadonJ 







United Methodist 

The Rev. Carol Stine will be the ushers, 
have "Spiritual Gifts - 1" as 
her sermon topic at the 10 
a.m. worship service Sunday 
at Quincy Community 
United Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St., Wollaston. 

Joseph Vallarttini will 
serve as the lector. 

Isabel Morrison will be 
the greeter and Dorothy 



Thepastorwill narrate the 
children's message. The 
women's chorus will have 
two selections — "Whisper- 
ing Hope" and "Lead Me, 
Guide Me!" 



Vacation Bible School At 
Wollaston Church Of Nazarene 



Coffee hourat 1 1 a.m. will 
be hosted by Adele Hamilton, 
Drucilla Madigan and 



Nagueira and Joan Honig will Marlene Briggette. 



Vacation Bible School 
will be held July 24-28 at 
Wollaston Church of the 
Nazarene, 37 East Elm Ave., 
Quincy. 

The program is open to all 
children who have completed 
Kindergarten, first, second, 
third or fourth grade,and will 
feature a week of fun activi- 



ties and Bible stories with 
your favorite Veggie Tale 
characters. 

For more information, call 
(617)472-5669. 



WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



American Heart 
Association^ 



« 





HadT idinas 

158 Wishm^on btjQuincy 

phone: 773-9797 

Rev. Gregory E. Wheaton, fystor 

New Summer Schedule 

Morning Worship 

8:30 & 10:30 AM 

4Youth & Children's Ministry 

A*Contemporary Worship 

■■ vMamage & Family Group 

■I •International Fellowship 

^ ^^ •DivorceCare 



Our Lady Of Good 
Counsel Parish 

227 Sea St., Quincy 
(617)472-1408 

MASSES 

Saturday 4:30 p.m. 

Sunday 

9AM& 11AM 

Daily Mass 9 AM 



Church Of St. John 
The Baptist 

44 School St., Quincy 
773-1021 

MASS SCHEDULE: 

Daily 8:00 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 

Saturday 4 p.m. 

Sunday 7, 9 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 

1 1 a.m.-Family Liturgy 

Confessions In Chapel 

Saturday 3-3:45 p.m. 

Rectory: 21 Gay St. 

Handicapped Accessible 

St. Joseph's Church 

550 Washington Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

617-472-6321 

SUNDAY MASSES: 

4 p.m. (On Saturday) 

8:30, 10, 11:30 a.m. & 5 pm 

Weekday Masses 9am 

CONFESSIONS: Saturday, 3:15-3:45 pm 

Handicapped accessible & 

Handicapped pariiing, side entrance 

air conditioned 




STAR OF THE SEA CHURCH 
Squantum, MA 328-0866 

Sunday Mass (4:00PM Saturday) 

8:30 & 10AM Sunday 

Daily Mass 9:00AM 

Confessions 3:00-3:45PM (sat) 

Baptisms every Sunday at 1 1am 



Saint Ann's Church 

757 Hancock Street Wollaston • 479-5400 

Pastor: Rev. Monsignor Robert P. Deeley 

Weekend Mass Schedule: Sat 4:00 & 7:00 PM, 

Sunday 7:00, 8:45, 11 :00AM 

Daily Masses: 9:00 AM 

Handicapped Chairlift Available 



St Mary's Church 

95 Crescent St., Quincy • 773-0120 

Masses 

Saturday, 4pm, Sunday 7, 9:30 

& 1 1:30am, Weekdays 9am 

Handicapped Accessible 

New Members Webome! 




Sacred Heart Church 

'A Roman Catholic Community walking together 

in Faith, Worship, Education and Sen/ice' 

386 Hancock St., 

North Quincy, MA 02171 

(617) 328-8666 

Sunday Masses 

4pm (Sat.) 7:45am, 9am (Family Liturgy) 

10:30am (with Choir) 12 noon and 5pm 

Weekday Masses 

Mon.-Fri 7am and 9am, Sat. 9am 

Handicapped Accessible 

Confessions 

Sat. 3-3:45pm in Saint Joseph Oratory 



HOUGHS NECK 

CONGREGATIONAL 

CHURCH 

310 Manet Ave., Quincy 

Sunday Service Of Worship 

9:30 AM Summer Schedule 

Scholarship Sunday 

Dr. Peter V. Corea Preaching 

Wheelchair accessible 

Air conditioned 

Use And Observe 

The Sabbath. 

Keep It Holy. 

Or Lose It! 



QUINCY POINT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

444 Washington Street • 773-6424 

1 0AM Worship Service 

'Compassions Boomerang' 

Rev. Leighton Foss, 
Interim Pastor Preaching 



UNION CONGREGATIONAL 
CHURCH 

Beach St. & Rawson Rd.,Wollaston 

479-6661 

'Brought by the Blood of Chrisf 

Pastnr fl^i/ .Inhn Pari Fiwanson 



BETHANY CONGREGAWNAL CHURCH 

Comer of Spear & Coddington Sts., 

Quincy Center •479-7300 

8:30 a.m. Chapel Sen/ice 

10 a.m. Sunday Worship 

Rev. William Harding, Pastor 

'Different As Nigt)t And Day' 

Summer Church Sc/k)o/ - Childcare Available 




St. Chrysostom*s 
Episcopal Church 

Corner of Hancock & Linden Sts. 

Wollaston • (617) 472-0737 
Sunday 8 & lOam 
Holy Eucharist 
Sunday School 
& Nursery at 10am 

Thrift Shop open 
Wed-Fri I0am-4pm 
Everybody Welcome 







The Lord's Planting 

Quincy Foursquare Church 

Corner of Newbury Ave. & 

Sagamore St., N. Quincy 

847-4444 

Sunday Service 9:30 & 11 AM 

'Fueling Your Spiritual Ambition' 




<- 



QUINCY COMMUNITY 
UNITED METHODIST 
CHURCH 

40 Beale St., Wollaston • 773-3319 

10 -AA/f Sunday Worship 

Rev. Carol Stine Preaching 

'Spiritual Gifts - /' 




Wollaston 
Church Of The Nazarene 

37 East Elm Ave., Wollaston, 472-5669 

Interim pastor Naale McL^ln 

Rev. Samuel Chung: Pastor 

Quincy Chinese Church of the Nazarene 

Sunday Services, 8:30am Holy Communion 

9:30am Cantonese Worship (Shader Hall) 

9:45am Christian Education (all ages) 

1 1am Morning Worship Celebration 

' Nursery Care and Children's Church through grade 4 

6pm Evening Service (contemporary) 

The Wollaston Church of the Nazarene is 

air conditioned and wheelchair access/We. 

ALL ARE WELCOME 




THE SALVATION ARMY 

6 Baxter St, Quincy • 472-2345 

9:45 SUNDAY SCHOOL 

11AM WORSHIP SERVICE 

6PM PRAISE SERVICE 

7PM TUES WOMEN'S FELLOWSHIP 

7:15PM WED. BIBLE STUDY 



Spiritualist 



First Spiritualist 
Church of Quincy 

40 West St., Quincy, MA 02169 
(617) 770-2246 

Service Wednesdays 9pm 
Pastor Rev. Rita S. Berkowitz, C.H.,C.M. 



TO Advertise IN 

THIS DIRECTORY, 
CALL 471-3100 



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Pagc26 TlMi Qulxtoy Siu& Thursday, July 20, 2000 



CCITUAI^IES 



ginia G. (Wilkinson) 
Galarneaux, 74, of 
Squantum, a homemaker, 
was held Monday in First 
Church of Squantum. 

Mrs. Galarneaux died July 
1 3 at Norwood Health & Re- 
habilitation, Norwood. 

Bom in Westminster, Ver- 
mont, she had lived in 
Norwood before moving to 
Squantum four years ago. 

She was active in several 
committees and church clubs 



Constance R. Lundy, 87 

Retired Quincy Hospital Registered Nurse 



Virginia C. Galarneaux, 74 

A funeral service for Vir- Paul of Abington; another 

daughter, Debra A. O'Neil 

and her husband Michael of A funeral Mass for iliary. 

Walpole; a sister, Priscilla Constance R. Lundy, 87, of She is survived by a 

Vaughan of Alameda, Ca- Quincy, a retired registered brother, Francis J. Lundy of 

lif.; two granddaughters, nurse and veteran of Uie Army Quincy; a sister, Lucille 



at First Church. She was a 

Girl Scout leader and youth North Quincy 



Elizabeth and Nicole 
Mollica; a niece and a 
nephew. She was the daugh- 
ter of the late Harold C. and 
Gladys Wilkinson. 

Burial was in Needham 
Cemetery, Needham. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Keohane Funeral 
Home, 333 Hancock St., 



Catherine C. Burke, 75 

Retired Data Entry Assistant 

A funeral Mass for Quincy High School in 1942. 
Catherine C. "Kay" Wife of the late Leo F. 
(Swanson) Burke, 75, who "Buddy" Burke, she is sur- 
woiiced for the city of Quincy vived by two sons, ftobert F. 

Burice of Boston and Rich- 
ard A. Burke of Dallas, 
Texas; a daughter, Ann C. 



Church, 44 School St. 

She died July 10 at 
Hancock Park Nursing and 
Rehabilitation Center after a 
brief illness. 

Mrs. Burke woriced for 



Yerkes of Brockton; a 
brother, Albert D. Swanson 
Jr. of Brockton; four grand- 
children and many nieces and 
nephews. :. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 



group leader in Squantum. 

Wife of the late Atty. Wil- 
liam J. Galarneaux, she is 
survived by daughter Susan 
C. Mollica and her husband 



Donations may be made 
to Alzheimers Association of 
Eastern MA, 36 Cameron 
Ave., Cambridge, MA 
02140. 




SCOTT DEW ARE 



4 Woimrr 

There is an old Dutch proverb which 
states, "An ounce of patience is worth a 
pound of brains." 

To do swiftly what seems to need 

doing is good because this is a part of the 

business of survivaL But to act too swiftly, 

without even an instant's reflection, is 

not good. The lower animals act swiftly; 

they do not meditate. Sometimes they survive, but often they hurl 

themselves into traps. 

If we claim to be higher animals, we must practice a little 
reasoning, a little reflection, for these are said to be virtues which set 
us above other animals. It is good to remember the statement that 
has come down to us from an ancient Chinese sage: "One moment 
of patience may ward off great disaster, one moment of unpatience 
may ruin a whole life..." 

Deware Family Funeral Homes 

Serving All Faiths & Nationalities 



Nurse Corps, was celebrated Lagerloef of Old Greenwich, for 14 years, was celebrated 

TuesdayatSt.Ann'sChurch, CT; a sister-in-law, Lillian July 14 at St. John the Baptist 

Wollaston. Lundy ofConcord, MA; and 

Mrs. Lundy died July 13 several nieces, nephews, 

at home. grandnieces and grandneph- 

Bom in Boston, she was a ews. 
lifelong resident of Quincy. She was the daughter of 

She was employed as a the late Constantine and Alice 

registered nurse for 30 years M. (Healey) Lundy. She was Quincy 's retiremeiit office as 

at Quincy Hospital (now also the sister ofthe late Mary a data entry assistant, retir- Cemetery. 

Quincy Medical Center) un- C. Lundy, Robeit H. Lundy ing in 1987. Funeral arrangements 

til her retirement in 1975. and William F. Lundy. She previously had were by Sweeney Brothers 

She served in the Army Burial was in Blue Hill worked for the Metropolitan Home for Funerals, 1 Inde- 

Nurse Corps from 1943 to Cemetery, Braintree. Life Insurance Co. in Quincy pendenceAve. 

1947. Funeral arrangements for many years. 

Mrs. Lundy was chairman were by the Keohane Funeral She was a longtime mem- 

of the Cherry Gift Shop, Home, 785 Hancock St., ber of St. John the Baptist 

Quincy Hospital. Wollaston. ' Church. 

She was a member of the Memorial donations may Bom in Dorchester, she 

Barefoot Bay Country Club, be made to Quincy Medical was a lifelong resident of 

a member of the Quincy His- Center Health & Education 

torical Society and a life Foundation, 114 Whitwell 

member of the Hospital Aux- St., Quincy, MA 02169. 



Donations may be made 
to The Gillette Center for 
Women's Cancers, Attn: 
Candace Lowe, c/o Dana- 
Farber Cancer Institute, 44 



Wollaston Chapel 
576 Hancock Street 

Quincy, MA 02170 



Hannel Chapel 

86 Copeland Street 

W. Quincy, MA 02169 



A (617) 472-1137 
Affprdability Plus Service 
Advanced Planning • Cremation Service Available 
Services Rendered To Any Distance 



Norma Del Longo, 92 

Retired Dressmaker 

A funeral Mass for Norma sisters, Nella Mason, Alba 



Quincy. She graduated from Binney St., Boston 021 15. 

Mark R. McMahon, 46 

Auto Body Technician 



A memorial Mass for 
Mark R. McMahon, 46, of 
Quincy, formerly of Garden 



of Hollywood, Fla., Paul K. 
McMahon of Port Ludlow, 
Wash., and Brian M. 



Del Longo, 92, of Quincy, a Del Longo and Josephine Del Grove, Calif., an auto body McMahon of Quincy; a sis- 
retired dressmaker, was eel- Longo, all of Quincy, and technician for 20 years and ter, Mary E. Amorosi of 



ebrated July 14 at St. Mary's many nieces and nephews. 
Church. Burial was in Blue Hill 

She died July 1 1 at Quincy Cemetery, Braintree. 
Medical Center after a brief Funeral arrangements 

illness. were by Dennis Sweeney 

Miss Del Longo was bom Funeral Home, 326 Copeland 

and raised in Quincy and at- St., West Quincy. 
tended Quincy public 
schools. . 



an active volunteer at Father 
Bill's Place, was celebrated 
July 13 at Sacred Heart 
Church, 386 Hancock St. 

He died July 9 at Quincy 
Medical Center after a brief 
illness. 



She is survived by three to charity 

Lorna T. Bennett, 83 



Born in Boston, Mr. 
Donations may be made McMahon was a graduate of 

North Quincy High School. 

He is survived by three 

brothers, John J. McMahon 



Yarmouth; 10 nieces and 
nephews and a grandniece. 

Burial was in Ancients 
Cemetery, Yarmouthport. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Cremation Society 
of Massachusetts. 

Donations may be made 
to Father Bill's Place, c/o 
Janice Whalen, 38 Broad St., 
Quincy 02169. , 



A ftineral Mass for Loma 
T. (Piers) Bennett, 83, of 
Quincy, was celebrated July 




Grandpa loved 
gardening, baseball, 
and playing the 
harmonica. 

Your memories are precious. That's why, at 
Keohane Funeral Service, we take the time to 
find out what made your loved one special. 
Whether it's gatherir^ some of 
the flowers he so tenderly 
cultivated or finding 
a musician to play 
'Take Me Out to 
the Ball Game" on the' 
harmonica, you can count on us to help 
you plan a service that will be just as 
unique as the person you love. 



^oUno fmeraC iServico 

785 Hancock Street • Quincy • 617-773-3551 



14 at Most Blessed Sacra- 
ment Church, Houghs Neck. 

Mrs. Bennett died July 1 1 
at Quincy Medical Center. 

Bom in St. John, New 
Brunswick, Canada, she lived 



Mark N. M ossbacher, 42 

Microphotographer For RMV 



A ftineral Mass for Mark 
N. Mossbacher, 42, of 
Quincy, a microphotogra- 



in Quincy and Palmetto, Fla., pher for the Registry of Mo- 



for 40 years. 

She is survivedby her hus- 
band, Fred Beimett; a son, 
Stephen Bennett of Quincy; 
two daughters, Janice Flaim 
and Karen DeForest of Ver- 



tor Vehicles, was celebrated 
July 14 at St. Agatha's 
Church, Milton. 

He died July 10 at home. 

Mr. Mossbacher was a 





Franklin Institute. 

He is survived by his 
mother, Katherine M. 
(MacDonald) Mossbacher, 
and many aunts, uncles and 
cousins. 

He was the son of the late 
Nicholas C. Mossbacher. 

Burial was in Milton Cem- 
etery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Dolan Funeral 
Home, Milton. 

Donations may be made 




Member by Invitation 



€mi 



National Selected Morticians 




member of the Milton Auxil- 

mont; three grandchildren iary Fire Department, 
and two great-grandchildren. Bom in Milton, he had 

Burial was in Knollwood lived there until 1995 when 

Memorial Park, Canton. he moved to Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements He was a graduate of the toChildren's Hospital, Attn: 

were made by Deware Fu- Charles River Academy in Alex Bregman, Box 43 1,300 

neral Home, 576 Hancock Cambridge and received an Longwood Ave., Boston 

St., Wollaston. associate's degree from 02215. 



Over 50 Years of Personalized Service 

SWEENEY BROTHERS 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 

JEFFREY F. SWEENEY 

1 1NDEPENDENCE AVENUE 

QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 02169 

(617) 472-6344 



wmm 



Regina E. Devine, 91 

Former Secretary 



Thunday, July 20, 2000 TlMQaliioy Sun Pagc27 



Doris Snook) 84 

■ Retired Private Secretary And Office Manager 



Edna Verzuh, 78 

Former Administratiye Assistant At MIT 



A funeral Mass for Regina 
E. (O'Donnell) Dcvine,91, a 
former secretary, was cel- 
ebrated July 14 at St. Mary's 
Church. 

She died July 1 1 at John 
Scott Nursing Home in 
Braintiee after a long illness. 

Mrs. Devine was arecord- 
ing secretary with the Quincy 
Police Wives' Association. 

Bern in Boston, she had 
lived in Quincy for many 
years and was a graduate of 
Girls High School. 

Wife of the late William 
J, Devine, she is survived by 
three sons, William J. Devine 



of Washington, D.C., Tho- 
mas A. Devine of Quincy, 
and James F. Devine of 
Sudbury; a daughter, Regina 
M. Welch of Amherst,-N.H.; 
eight grandchildren; six 
great-grandchildren and 
many nieces and nephews. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Dennis Sweeney 
Funeral Home, 326 Copeland 
St. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Heart Asso- 
ciation, 20 Speen St., 
Framingham 01707. 



Joseph P. Lavezzo, 81 

Baker And WWII Army Veteran 



A memorial service for 
Doris "Dottie" Winifred 
(Christensen) Snoolc, 84, of 
Quincy, a retired private sec- 
retary and office manager, 
will be held tomorrow (Fri- 
day) at 1 1:30 a.m. at (Atlan- 
tic) Memorial Congrega- 
tional Church, Newbury Ave. 
and Sagamore St., North 
Quincy. 

Mrs. Snook died July 15 
after a lengthy illness. 

Bom in Somerville, Mrs. 
Snook spent most of her life 
in Quincy and was a gradu- 
ate of Quincy High School. 

She was a regular partici- 
pant and gold medalist in the 
Quincy Senior Olympics. 

She is survived by her hus- 



band, Clarence J. "Jake" 
Snook; two daughters, 
Gretchen (Snook) Martin of 
Vercheres, Quebec, and 
Lauren R. (Snook) Chartier 
of Kingston; two sons, 
Severen J. Snook of South 
Dennis, and Christian B. 
Snook of Fairfield, CT; two 
brothers, Lawrence A. 
Christensen of McMurry, 
PA, and Ralph C. Christensen 
of Port Washington, NY; nine 
grandchildren and many 
nieces and nephews. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by The Cremation So- 
ciety of Massachusetts, 26 
Adams St., C^incy Center. 

E)onations may be made 
to charity. 



A funeral service will be 
held at 1 1 a.m. today (Thurs- 
day) for Edna (Tamm) 
Verzuh, 78, of Boston, 
Quincy, and Norway, ME, a 
former administrative assis- 
tant, at the Hamel, Wickens, 
& Troupe Funeral Home, 26 
Adams St., Quincy Center. 

Mrs. Verzuh died July 16 
■ at Beth Israel Deaconess Hos- 
pital after a long illness. 

Wife of computer science 
pioneer Dr. Frank M. Verzuh 
and the only child of the late 
Bror and Frieda (Johnson) 
Tamm, she served as an ad- 
ministrative assistant at MIT 
from 1941 to 1958, chiefly in 
the Office of Statistical Ser- 



vices. 



She subsequently collabo- 
rated with her father, long- 
time superintendent of 
George Lawley and Son 
Corp., Neponset, inresearch- 
ing the history of the yacht- 
building firm. 

She is survived by her 
husband. Dr. Frank M. 
Verzuh; three cousins, Mar- 
garet Troup, Kristen Johnson, 
and Harris Johnson, all of 
Quincy; and one aunt, Julia 
Johnson of Quincy. 

Burial will be in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Donations may be made 
to The American Cancer So- 
ciety, 30 Speen St., 
Framingham 01701. 



A funeral Mass for Jo- 
seph P. Lavezzo, 81, of 
Quincy, a baker at Grahn's 
Bakery for 20 years and an 
Army veteran of World War 
II, Was celebrated July 12 at 
St. John the Baptist Church, 
44 School St. , 

He died July 9 at home. 

Born and educated in 
Washington, D.C., Mr. 
Lavezzo lived in Quincy for 
over 50 years. 

Husband of the late 
Josephine P. (Murphy) 



Lavezzo, he is survived by a . 
son, Joseph P. Lavezzo Jr. of 
Quincy; a daughter, Patricia 
A. Cogliano of Sandwich; 
two sisters, Angela Lavezzo 
and Lena Boyle, both of 
Bethesda, Md.; and a grand- 
son. 

Burial was in Massachu- 
setts National Cemetery, 
Bourne. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Sweeney Brothers 
Home for Funerals, 1 inde- 
pendence Ave. 



Elizabeth Fardy, 94 

Homemaker 



Minnie Page, 80 



Nora Moar, 96 

Nurse's Aid 



A funeral Mass for Nora' 
(Conroy) Moar, 96, of 
(Quincy, a retired nurse' s aide, 
was celebrated Monday at 
Sacred Heart Church, North 
Quincy. 

Mrs. Moar died July 1 3 at 
home. 

A native of Galway, Ire- 
land, she was educated in Ire- 
land andemigrated to the U.S. 
in 1925. She lived in 
Dorchester before moving to 
Quincy 10 years ago. 

She worked as a nurse's 
aide for 38 years at Harley 
hospital, Dorchester. 

Wife of the late James 
Moar, she is survived by two 



sons, James P. Moar of 
Stoneham and Thomas 
"Hugh" Moar of C^iincy; a 
daughter, Mary Lou Moar of 
(Juincy; nine grandchildren 
and 13 great-grandchildren. 
She was the sister of the late 
Mary Faherty. 

Burial was in Milton Cem- 
etery, Milton. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to Old Colony Hos- 
pice, 14 Page Terrace, 
Stoughton, MA 02072. 



A funeral Mass for Eliza- 
beth A. (Pinsent) Fardy, 94, 
of (Quincy, a homemaker, was 
celebrated Tuesday at St. 
Joseph's Church. 

Mrs. Fardy died July 1 5 at 
Elihu White Nursing Home, 
Braintree. 

Mrs. Fardy was a member 
of the St. Joseph's Church 
Ladies Sodality and Arch- 
bishop Williams Mothers' 
Guild. 

Bom, raised, and educated 
in Newfoundland, she had 
lived in Quincy for the past 
58 years. 

Wife of the late Thomas 



A. Fardy, she is survived by 
a son, Thomas Faraday of 
Quincy; a daughter, Claire 
Lommano of Quincy; two 
sisters, Gertrude Murphy and 
Sheila Hawco of Newfound- 
land; and six grandchildren. 

She was the mother of the 
late Arline Fardy. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Dennis Sweeney 
Funeral Homes, 74 Elm St. 

Donations may be made 
to St. Joseph's Building 
Fund, 530 Washington St., 
Quincy 02169. 



Minnie Page, 80, of 
Peterborough, NH, formeriy 
of Quincy, died July 3 in 
Peterborough, NH. 

Bom in 1919 in Cam- 
bridge, Mrs. Page lived al- 
most three decades in Quincy 
and raised her family there. 
Mrs. Page lived in several 
other towns, including 
Braintree from 1980 to 1993. 

Wife of the late Arthur J. 
Page, Jr., she is survived by a 
daughter, Marilyn Page of 



Steamboat Springs, CO; and 
a son, Richard Page, a daugh- 
ter-in-law, Debra Page, and 
a grandson, Dennis Page, all 
of Bennington, NH. 



WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



American Heart 
AssodationJ 



« 





Adoption Day eveiy Saturday lOam-Apm 

Sheher Telephone: 617-376-1364 

6 17-471-2668 Sandra - Dog Adoptkm by appointment 

781-749-8668 Sliaron - Cat Adoptions by appointment 

K, Dfifis 

; MIDASt red Do hernian-I^b mix with double Paws, soft red coat 



^ with tan points, loveable and huggable. A happy dog, loves walks 
$ MISTY: Shepherd mix . 5 years, black, sweet, submissive & smart 



Doris Slattery, 99 

Homemaker 



^ BIJFFY: Cocker Spaniel , male, 10 years, buff colored, needs an 



The Rev. Robert Killeffer 
officiated a funeral service 
Tuesday for Doris Hale 
(Nason) Slattery, 99, of 
Braintree, formerly of 
Quincy and South Boston, a 
homemaker, at The First Bap- 
tist Church in Braintree. 

Mrs. Slattery died July 1 5 
at the Braintree Manor Nurs- 
ing and Rehabilitation Cen- 
ter. 

Mrs. Slattery was the old- 
est living member of The 
South Baprist Church in 
South Boston. 

She lived in Squantum for 
34 years and prior to that in 
South Boston. 

She is survived by a 
daughter, Martha McConnell 
of Braintree; eight grandchil- 
dren; and 19 great-grandchil- 
dren. 

She was the wife of the 
late Joseph Arthur Slattery 
who died in 1 972 and mother 
of the late Jay Arthur Slattery, 



formerly of South 
Weymouth. 

Burial was at Nason Cem- 
etery in Hampton Falls, NH. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Mortimer N. Peck- 
Russell Peck Funeral Home, 
516 Washington St. 

Donations may be made 
to the South Baptist Church, 
L and 4th St., South Boston 
02127. 



IN MF^MOF^IAM 



In Loving Memory of 
1993 Paul P. Elias 2000 

Anniversary July 19 

You are still in my heart 

and mind. 

I miss you more and 

more each day. 

My prayers are with you 

morning and night and 

throughout the day. 

Love, Dad le. 



angel to rescue him 

yiMA; Sheoard mix , female, 4 years, well trained and loves the 



outdoors. 

CALVIN; Pitbull Terrier-mix, male, 1 1 months, needs an experi- 



enced dog owner. Loves people. 

WOLFIE; RottweiUer . male, 18 months, handsome with special 



needs. A great, big beautiful dog 

STELLA; Pitbull-Akita mix , male, 1 year, black and white short 



coat, playful and happy. A great disposition. 

(TIAKL^.; Beagle/Sheoard mix. 7 months, fawn coat. 

TYSON; Great Dane mix . 1 8 months, brindled colored. His whole 

body wiggles when he wags his tail. 

DUSTY; Shitzu . 4 years old, white black brindle. Adorable, a great 



lap dog, adults only 



Cats 



WESLEY, male, 1 year, all black Persian tuxedo, bright golden ; 

eyes. Needs special TLC. Former abuse victim. 

ELL male, 10 months, male Maine Coon, long haired black with a 

perfect chest locket of white. 

SAMMl. male, 2 years, DSH burnished red tabby. Sam has never 

had a permanent home; desperately needs someone to call his own. 

PARKER, male, handsome long haired, displaced because house 

caught fire. 

LONNIE. female, 1 year, all white with grey patches, petite. 

■lAMIE. female, 10 months. DSH all black female. 

y/tNDVAND.IOSH. 1 year, DSH tuxedo male twins. A matched 

pair, very handsome, shy and sweet. Need a special person to love 

them. 

MARY, female, 2 years, glossy all black female. Very friendly. 

COLIN, male, 10 months, magnificent long haired all tabby boy. 

KQMAS.male, 1 year, DSH grey and white triple-pawed with front ; 



feet that look like baseball gloves 




Social Security: 

65 Years Young And 
Still Going Strong 

By LAURIE ZASTROW 

Social Security is 65 years "young" this month, and, 
like a majority of the seniors it serves, is still a robust, 
dynamic force. 

The recent elimination of the earnings test for people 
over full retirement age will likely encourage more of our 
seniors to continue to work. With a shrinking workforce 
in the United States, employers will be overjoyed to hire 
this experienced population. 

Although some second (and even third!) careers may 
pay less than the first, seniors will now be able to count on 
Social Security to supplement their earnings with no 
penalty for earning over a certain amount. And, in fact, 
their additional earnings may increase their future ben- 
efits if they are higher than some years' prior earnings. 

Over the course of their lifetimes, people change, 
mature and gain experience. And now, more than ever 
before, they can look forward to continuing to live longer 
and more productive lives. 

Social Security has likewise grown during the past 65 
years and today looks forward to continuing to provide a 
base of income security for our older Americans in the 
years to come. 

To find out more about how you can work and still 
collect retirement benefits, visit our website at 
www.ssa.gov . While you're there, subscribe to our new 



electronic newsletter, e-news 

SOCIAL SECURITY SOLVENT UNTIL 2037 

The Social Security Board of Trustees' annual report 
reveals that the long-range financial picture of Social 
Security's programs has improved since last year. Spe- 
cifically, the Board announced that Social Security's trust 
fund assets will not be depleted until 2037. 

SOCIAL SECURITY EARNINGS 
TEST ELIMINATED 

The "Senior Citizens' Freedom to Worit Act of 2000," 
signed by President Clinton on April 7, eliminates the 
Social Security retirement earnings test for people who 
attain full retirement age (currently age 65). This law is 
effective Jan. 1, 2000. 
(Laurie Zastrow is Social Security manager in Quincy.) 



Page 28 Tbe Qulnoy Sun Thursday, July 20, 2000 






Craig's Cafe 

1354 HmooGY. 9t., Quincy Carrter 
770-9271 Fax:770-9272 

breakfast Served 6am-TIam 

• Homemade Soupe, 5a\ade & Veeeerte 

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CATERING AVAILABLE 
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J.M. Productions 

Presents 

Dinner Theatre at 



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Girls 




July 20, 21,26* & 27 



The Music of Mame, Hello Dolly, La Cage Aux Folles & Maiiy More! 

By Broadway Composer Jerry Herman 

For more information, or to order tickets, 

call 617-786-SHOW (7469) 




Flippy tdSHs Pet Sitting 

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KING CROSSWORD 



ACROSS 

1 1980s South 
J African 
leader 

6 Swab 

9 Hot tub 

12 Baseball's 
Hank 

13 AP rival 

14 Skirmish 

15 Move along 
the edge of 

16 Favorable 
outcome 

18 Makes one 

20 Saxophone 
range 

21 Oft- 
tattooed word 

23 Sedan or 
hatchback 

24 Actress 
DeGeneres 

25 Xanadu's river 
27 The 23rd is a 

famous one 
29 Stick 
31 Colanders 
35 Jessica Parker 

or Michelle 

Gdlar 

37 Wadding 
shower? 

38 Hamburger, 
e.g. 

41 Morning 
moisture 



43 Pasture 
denizen 

44 Potpourri 

45 Most 
logical 

47 Ahead 
49 Free 

52 Leading lady 

53 Chiang 
— shek 

54 TV 
producer 

Michaels 

55 Roulette bet 

56 Conceit 
67 Couturier's 

concern 

DOWN 

1 — relief 

2 Squirrels' 
hangout 

3 Come 
out on 
top 

4 Antler 
6 Caper 

6 Thoughtful 
folks 

7 Piece 
of work 

8 Snapshot 

9 Wonderful 

10 Collagist's 
need 

11 Fire 
crime 



17 Less tense 
19 Thin 
candle 

21 Calf s 
comment 

22 In need of 
repair 

24 Cantab's rival 
26NRA 

VIP 
28 Pale 
30 Bob's longtime 

partner 

32 One 

may be moral 

33 Environmen- 
tally friendly 

34 Wield 
a 
needle 

36 Leisurely, to 
Lehar 

38 Strength 

39 Breathing 

40 Having 
prongs 

42 The Invisible 
Man' author 

45 Hidden 
protHem 

46 Santa's 
laundry woe 

48 Mamie's man 

50 54-Across' 
brainchild 

51 Shoebox 
letters 



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30 




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46 




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49 






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51 


52 






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ANSWERS TO CROSSWORD 



□BCD HOG] BaHBCJ 
□QUO] QCjaiSQ 



Trivia Test by Fifi Rodriguez 

1. GOVERNMENT: What are the two houses of the 
British Parliament called? 

2. ANIMALS: What kind of a creature is a gibbon? * 

3. COMMON KNOWLEDGE: What docs the Geneva 
;ross symbolize? 

4. ANATOMY: What is another name for totipalmate 
feet? 

5. CHEMISTRY: What is the symbol for the element 
sodium? 

6. FIULOSOPHY: Who was the founder of the Greek 
school of thought whose followers were called the Cynics? 

7. POETRY: Who wrote the words, "God's in his heaven/ 
All's right with die world"? 

8. ART: For what type of work was the 16th century artist 
Titian best known? 

9. fflSTORY: Who won the duel that kiUed Alexander 
Hamilton? 

10. TELEVISION: What was Festus' last name on 
"Gunsmoke"? 



TRIVIA ANSWERS 



'osSSbh 01 '-JJtia aorev 
•5 !3nparBd g 'SmiiMaia waqoH 7, tssuaSoiQ 9 Ibm 5 



Salome's Stars 



Hocus-rocus 



•Y 
HENRY BOLTINQFF 




Find at ieast six dtffarsnoee in details between pvwis. 





■**»! « JTO^ *»m'i »<«»W s ^vo^<aq n aoasj > psAouoi 
ti pMOix c •Bfleiw « l»H 2 paAootti an ten«io *l .saouwejBja 



TOP 10 MOVIES 



1. Me, Myself & Irene 
(R) Jim Carrey 

2. Chicken Run (G) feat, 
the voice of Mel Gibson 

3. Shaft (R) Samuel L. 
Jackson 

4. Gone In Sixty Se- 
conds (PG-13) Nicholas 
Cage 

5. Big Monuna's House 
(PG-13) Maitin Lawrence 



6. Mission: Impossible 2 
(PG-13) Tom Cniisc 

7. Gladiator (R) Russell 
Crowe 

8. Titan AE (PG) Matt 
Damon, Drew Barrymore 

9. Dinosaur (PG) D.B. 
Sweeny 

10. Boys and Girls (PG- 
13) Freddie Prinze Jr. 



ARIES (March 2 1 to April 

19) This might not be the 
right time to move a relation- 
ship to another level. Keep it 
light for now, and wait for a 
more favorable poiod to ask 
for a commitment 

TAURUS (April 20 to 
May 20) Your determination 
pays off as your ideas find a 
receptive audience. Be flexi- 
ble about making changes. 
You have a lot of people 
pulling for your success. 

GEMINI (May 21 to June 

20) A healdi scare nuns out 
to be more dietary than dire. 
It might be an allergy or » 
temporary upset, but have it 
checked out. Vacation plans 
might have to be changed. 

CANCER (June 21 to July 
22) A disagreement b^ween 
you and a co-woika could 
come to a serious c(xifronta- 
tion. Before things get out of 
hand, ask an impartial diird 
party to mediate. 

LEO (July 23 to August22) • 
Your sense of styk gets you 
nodced by the right pooide at 
work. However, you need to 
back up your style widi sub- 
stance in (xder to get that pio- 
nxxion you're seddng. 

VIRGO (August 23 to 
September 22) A so-called 
friend turns out to be the 
source of the problems in 
your relationship. Make 
your explanations to your 
partner and then hope for die 
best. Cut all ties widi your 
once-trusted pal. 

LIBRA (September 23 to 
October 22) An atten^t to 
re-establish an old friendship 



runs into difficulty when 
your old pal insists on living 
in the past while you prefer 
to move on. 

SCORPIO (October 23 to 
November 21) Planetary 
ntovements affect your ener- 
gy level. Consider making a 
temporary switch from ener- 
gy-intensive activities to 
somediing less demanding. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov- 
ember 22 to December 21) 
Family matto^ take prece- 
dence in the early part of the 
week. Later, you get good 
news about a once-rocky 
relationship that has now 
stabilized. 

CAPRICORN (Decem- 
ber 22 to January 19) Your 
vacation plans could run up 
against someone else's plans 
for your time. Before you 
say no, it might pay to listen 
to all the facts. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 
to February 1 8) A family dis- 
pute forces you to examine 
where your loyalties should 
lie. Best advice: Instead of 
taking sides, work to bring 
the parties togedier. 

PISCES ^ebniaiy 19 to 
March 20) A career change 
you once considered and then 
dismissed has unexpectedly 
opened up again. You might 
now feel you're more pre- 
pared to make this move. ^ 

YOU WERE BORN 
THIS WEEK: You can be 
alone if you have to be, but 
you much prefer being with 
people — and fortunately, 
people love being widi you. 
® 2000 King Features Synd., Inc. 



Wishing 




IWell* 


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HERE IS A PLEASANT UTTLE GAME that wifl give you a 
mess«g»avarydiy. ITs a numerical puzzle destined to speN 
out your forim Coum iw leHwt In your irsi nanw. If the 
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to Mi. Vm fMd ttw massage itm man under tha 
chacMd igurw glva you. 



c^ v:*.. 



Thursday, July 20,2000 TIm Quincy Sun Page 29 



Tamara Erdley Named 
Public Relations Coordinator 



Tamara Erdley has been 
named public relations 
coordinator at South Shore 
Mental Health (SSMH), a 
community resource 
providing mental health and 
substance abuse services 
throughout the South Shore, 
Southeastern Massachusetts 
and Cape Cod. 

As public relations 
coordinator, Erdley will be 
responsible for all internal 
and external publications, 
media placement and 
communications, and event 
planning. In addition, she 
will coordinate the 
development and 

maintenance of all 
marketing materials and 
represent the organization at 
community events, health 
fairs, and trade shows. 




TAMARA ERDLEY 

Prior to her position at 
SSMH, Erdley was public 
relations specialist at Quincy 
Medical Center. She 
received her bachelor of arts 
degree in communications 
from Plattsburgh State 
University in New York and 
completed her internship in 
training in public relations at 
The Buffalo General 
Hospital. 



Five Residents On 
Johnson & Wales Dean's List 

Five Quincy students at McCarthy, majoring in 
Johnson & Wales College culinary arts; Michelle 
have been named to the Sherwood, majoring in 
Dean's List for the spring travel-tourism management; 
semester. Crystal Tripp, majoring in 
They are: culinary arts; and Kerri 
John Marina, majoring in Ward, majoring in hotel- 
international business; Scott restaurant management. 

William Murray Graduates 
From Anna Maria College 



Aniket Chakrabarti, MD. 
Joins South Shore Hospital 




NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 00-038 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 
of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on TUESDAY, 
AUGUST 1, 2000, at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the application of SNOOKUMS 
REALTY TRUST for a VARIANCE to install a 7' x 5' double 
faced internally illuminated sign cabinet on two 6' x 6' square 
steel poles located approximately 6' from the lot line in 
violation of Title 17 as amended CHAPTER 17.32.070 & 
17.32.080 (SIGNS) on the premises numbered 174-184 
WILLARD STREET & 100-106 ROGERS STREET, WEST 
QUINCY, as shown on Assessors Plan 4066. 

Stephen DesRoche, Chaimian 

7/13,7/20/00 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ' 

- City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 00-039 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 
of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on TUESDAY, 
AUGUST 1, 2000, at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the application of RALPH AND 
BEATRICE DIMATTIA for a FINDING for a change of office 
use from a sail repair business to a real estate brokerage 
business in accordance with Title 1 7 as amended CHAPTER 
17.24.020 (NON CONFORMANCE) on the premises 
numbered 731 EAST SQUANTUM STREET, SQUANTUM, 
as shown on Assessors Plan 6120A. 

Stephen DesRoche, Chairman 

7/13,7/20/00 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

City of Quincy 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 00-040 
Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 1 7 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 
of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on TUESDAY, 
AUGUST 1, 2000, at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the application of JAMES AND 
KAREN WALKER for a SPECIAL PERMIT FLOOD PLAIN 
to construct a one story addition sized at approximately 950 
SF to the existing dwelling in accordance with Title 17 as 
amended CHAPTER 17.40 (FLOOD PLAIN DISTRICT) on 
the premises numbered 381-387 MANET AVENUE, 
HOUGHS NECK, as shown on Assessors Plan 1057K. 

Stephen DesRoche, Chairman 

7/13,7/20/00 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
City of Quincy 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CASE NO. 00-041 

Pursuant to the provisions of TITLE 17 of the QUINCY 
MUNICIPAL CODE as amended, the Quincy Zoning Board 
of Appeals will hold an Open Public Hearing on TUESDAY, 
AUGUST 1, 2000. at 7:15 pm on the Second Floor in the 
Council Chambers, Quincy City Hall, 1 305 Hancock Street 
Quincy, MA 02169. On the application of PETER AIELLO 
for a VARIANCE to demolish existing single family dwelling 
and construct a 1 .720SF addition to the existing building in 
.violation qf Title 17 as amended CHAPTER 17.20 
(DIMENSIONAL REQUIREMENTS) on the prern^es 
numbered 41^ FRANKLIN STREET. QUINCY CENTER, 

as shown on Assessors Plan 3056. _ 

Stephen DesRoche, Chairman 

7/13,7/20/00 



William M. Murray of 
Quincy recently graduated 
from Anna Maria college 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 00P1 61 4EP 
In the Estate of 

ALFRED J. LABOLLITA 

Late Of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

To all persons interested 
in the above captioned 
estate, a petition has been 
presented praying that the 
last will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
ROSANNE LABOLLITA of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
executor, named in the will to 
serve without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO 
OBJECT THERETO, YOU 
OR YOUR ATTORNEY 
MUST FILE A WRITTEN 
APPEARANCE IN SAID 
COURT AT NORFOLK ON 
OR BEFORE TEN 
O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00 AM) ON 
August 16,2000. 

■'In addition, you must file 
a written affidavit of 
objections to the petition, 
stating specific facts and 
grounds upon which the 
objection is based, within 
thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
NORFOLK this day, July 5, 
2000. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/20/00 

SaveBasaRMoMy... 



with a master's degree in 
criminal justice. 



South Shore Hospital has 
appointed Quincy resident 
Aniket Chakrabarti* MD, to 
its active medical staff. 

Dr. Chakrabarti received 
his medical degree from 
Kasturba Medical College of 
Mangalore University in 
India. He completed his 
internship at Kasturba 
Medical College Hospital 
and his residency in internal 
medicine at Carney 




ANIKET CHAKRABARTI 

Hospital, Boston. 



■ III iiiiiiinij^iiitip^lJUllililili II II 

LEGAI,I«)TICE 



■aiiiiiiii 



LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 0OP1646EP 

In the Estate of 

EDWARD B. LARGEY 

Late Of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

, NOTICE OF PETITION 

FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

To all persons interested 
in the above captioned 
estate, a petition has been 
presented praying that the 
last will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
CATHERINE PENNING of 
ROSLINDALE in the County 
of SUFFOLK and DIANNE 
W. HAYES of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK be 
appointed executors, named 
in the will to serve without 
surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO 
OBJECT THERETO, YOU 
OR YOUR ATTORNEY 
MUST FILE A WRITTEN 
APPEARANCE IN SAID 
COURT AT NORFOLK ON 
OR BEFORE TEN 
O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (1 0:00 AM) ON 
August 16,2000. 

In addition, you must file 
a written affidavit of 
objections to the petition, 
stating specific facts and 
grounds upon which the 
objection is based, within 
thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
NORFOLK this day, July 6, 
2000. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
7/20/00 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 99P1368EP 

Notice Of Fiduciary's 
Account 

To all persons interested 
in the estate of Gino Biasetti, 
late of Quincy, in the county 
of Norfolk. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rule 72 that the First and 
final account of John P. 
Morgan as Executor (the 
fiduciary) of said estate has 
been presented to said Court 
for allowance. 

If you desire to preserve 
your right to file an objection 
to said account, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before the 
twenty-third day of August, 
2000, the return day of this 
citation. You may upon 
written request by registered 
or certified mail to the 
fiduciary, or to the attorney 
for the fiduciary, obtain 
without cost a copy of said 
account. If you desire to 
object to any item of said 
account, you must, in 
addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, file 
within thirty days after said 
return day or within such 
other time as the Court upon 
motion may order a written 
statement of each such item 
together with the grounds for 
each objection thereto, a 
copy to be served upon the 
fiduciary pursuant to Mass. 
R. Civ. P Rule 5. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this tenth day of 
July, 2000. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
7/20/2000 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 00P1 671 EP 
In the Estate of 
THERESA DRACOULES 
AKA THERESA G. 

DRACOULES 

Late Of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

To all persons interested 
in the above captioned 
estate, a petition has been 
presented praying that the 
last will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
CONSTANCE DONOVAN of 
ABINGTON in the County of 
PLYMOUTH and 

CHRISTOPHER 
DRACOULES of 

HOLLISTON in the County of 
MIDDLESEX be appointed 
executors, named in the will 
to serve without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO 
OBJECT THERETO, YOU 
OR YOUR ATTORNEY 
MUST FILE A WRITTEN 
APPEARANCE IN SAID 
COURT AT NORFOLK ON 
OR, BEFORE TEN 
O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00 AM) ON 
August 23, 2000. 

In addition, you must file 
a written affidavit of 
objections to the petition, 
stating specific facts and 
grounds upon which the 
objection is based, within 
thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
NORFOLK this day, July 10, 
2000. 

THOMAS PATRK:K HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/20/00 




INVITATION TO BID 

CITY OF QUINCY MASSACHUSETTS 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
1305 HANCOCK ST, QUINCY MA 02169 
Invites sealed bids/proposals for furnishing and delivering to the City of Quincy: 
FIRE ALARM PORTABLE RADIOS 

FIRE ALARM VOICE DISPATCHING SYSTEM 

SCHOOL DEPARMENT HEALTH SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT 



AUGUST 3, 2000 @ 10:30 A.M. 
AUGUST 3, 2000 ® 10:45 A.M. 
AUGUST 3, 2000 9 11 :00 A.M. 



Detailed specifications are on file at the office of the Purchasing Agent, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, Quincy, 
Massachusetts, 02169, between the hours of 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. 

Bids must state exceptions, if any, the delivery date and any allowable discounts. Bids/Proposals must be in a sealed 
envelope (which is supplied). The outside of the sealed envelope is to be cleariy marked "BID ENCLOSED" with time/date 

of bid call. j!^ . » »•, 

Firm bid prices will be given first consideration. Bids/Proposals will be received at the office of therurchasing Agent until 

the time and date stated above, at which time and date they will be publicly opened and read. Late Bids/Proposals, delivered 

by mail or in person, will be rejected. 
If applicable, Bids shall be in accordance with Chapter 149 of the M.G.L. as amended. M.G.L., Chapter 39, sectkw 39A, 

39B and 39F-R. M.G.L. Chapter 149, Section 26, 27, 29, 35 and 44A-44M. 
The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to accept any part of a bid or the one deenr>ed best for the City, and wawe 

any informalities in the bidding, if it is in the best interest of the City to do so. 

James A. Sheets, MAYOR 

Alfred J. Grazk)so, Jr., PURCHASING AGENT 
7/20/00 



Page 30 T]ft« Qulnoy Sun Thursday, July 20, 2000 




Classifieds & Legais 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 00C0126CA1 
Notice of Change 
Of Name 

To all persons Interested 
in the petition hereinafter 
described. 

A petition has been 
presented to said Court by 
Marisa Ann Reddy of 52 
Harriet Avenue, Quincy, 
Norfolk County, 02171 by 
Marisa Ann Reddy praying 
that her name may be 
changed as follows: 

Marisa Ann Reddy to 
Marisa Ann Granara. 

If you desire to object 
thereto you or your attomey 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedhann before ten o'clock in 
the forenoon on the 1 3th day 
of September, 2000. 

WITNESS, Hon. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Judge of said Court,. this 30th 
day of June, 2000. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/20/00 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket 00P1559GI 
NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR APPOINTMENT OF 

GUARDIAN WITH 
AUTHORITY TO TREAT 

AND/OR COMMIT 
TO THE 

MASSACHUSETTS 
DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL 
HEALTH AND TO Richard 
McNeiJ.Jr, of Quincy in the 
County of Norfolk and 
spouse or next of kin or other 
interested person(s). 

A petition has been 
presented to the Probate & 
Family Court requesting the 
appointment of a suitable 
limited guardian of the 
person with authority to 
monitor the administration of 
antipsychotic drugs. 
Petitioner further prays that 
Charlotte A. McNeil of 
Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk, be appointed 
guardian of the person 
Richard McNeil, Jr., with 
authority to monitor the 
administration of 

antipsychotic medicatbn and 
for authorization to consent 
to the extraordinary medical 
procedure as set forth in said 
petition. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your attomey 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham before ten o'clock in 
the forenoon on the twenty- 
sixth day of July, 2000, the 
return day of this citation. 

WITNESS, Hon. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Judge of said Court. 
Date June 23, 2000. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
KCHSTER 

7/20/00 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 

Here's a cNmce 

to earn extra money 

by bulkHng a 

Quincy Sun home 

delivery route. 

TeleplMHie 



rsrwsrr: 



PWANTEa J 

SEWING. Can you really 
sew? Do you know what 
a pattern repeat is? Do 
you know the difference 
between a seam and a 
selvage? Work in a cre- 
ative, stimulating environ- 
ment. If you are good 
$10/hour. 

Call Judy 
(617)825-4511 .3 



HEl>WANti& 




Thank You 

St Jude 

Blessed Mary 



E.A.N. 7/20 



HELP WANTED 

Experienced Weekend Grill Cook 

able to handle high volume, 

fast paced work environment. 

Seniors and retirees welcome. 



Send resume to: 

Early American Restaurant 

1054 Hancock Street 

Quincy, MA 021 69 

Attn: IVianager 

or call 

(617)328-8225 



7/20 




somm 



LEARN A NEW SKILL - 

CUSTOMER 

SERVICE REP 

FREE Training for 

the Job of Tomorrow. 

If you "like people" and work 

in retail or work as waitstaff 

now is the time to get new 

skills for the new workforce 

of the millennium. 

Customer Service 

Representatives 

Classes are 
beginning NOW! 
Cal! for an appointment or walk in 
(we are directly across from the Quincy Center T) 
We also do office clerical and administrative placements. 

Join CSR Solutions Today 

1212 Hancock Street, #101, Quincy 
617-472-9009, Fax 617-472-1991 
email: csrsolutions@msn.com 7/20 



Specializing In Servio Staffing 



Red Cross Golf Classic At South Shore Country Club 



The American Red Cross 
of Massachusetts Bay South 
Area will hold its 15th 
annual Golf Classic Monday, 
July 24 at the South Shore 
Country Club in Hingham 
with a 1 p.m. shotgun start. 

"This is a perfect way to 
make a significant 
contribution to a charitable 
cause, and have a great day 




of golf at the same time," 
said Jerry Dacey, chairman 
of the Golf Classic 
Committee. 

Other committee 

members include: Robert 
Goyette, Kevin M. Burke, 
James L. Chiccino, Glenn 
Ferguson, Mark Fisher, 
Michael Gianoni, Mae 
Harris, Daniel G. May,. 
Kevin M. Meskell, Kathy 
Palmer, Peter Palmer, Daniel 



J. Flynn, John J. Pasciucco, 
John Spillane, Kristen 
Williams, Lynne Houghton, 
Richard N. Hart, Mary 
Snethen, James McLean, 
Michelle Bowen, Mark 
Luppi and Helen Shea. 

Proceeds from the 
tournament will help Red 
Cross locally to continue its 
great work of: 

• Helping victims of fires, 
storms and other disasters 



recover and rebuild their 
lives. This past year Red 
Cross volunteers responded 
to 24 disaster situations, 
providing emergency 
assistance to 75 families. 

• Preparing parents, co- 
workers and teachers to 
respond to emergencies 
through training in First Aid 
and CPR. Volunteers teach 
hundreds of people at the 
Quincy Red Cross office. 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket 0OP164OEP 

In the Estate of 

ALBERT R VAUGHN 

Late Of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 
To all persons interested 
in the above captioned 
estate, a petition has been 
presented praying that the 
photocopy of last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed, and that JAMES 
VAUGHN of KINGSTON in 
the County of PLYMOUTH 
and ELAINE BROOKS of 
WELLESLEY in the County 
of NORFOLK be appointed 
executors, named in the will 
to serve without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO 
OBJECT THERETO, YOU 
OR YOUR ATTORNEY 
MUST FILE A WRITTEN 
APPEARANCE IN SAID 
COURT AT NORFOLK ON 
OR BEFORE TEN 
O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00 AM) ON 
August 16, 2000. 

In addition, you must file 
a written affidavit of 
objections to the petition, 
stating specific facts and 
grounds upon which the 
objection is based, within 
thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other 
tinr)e as the court, on niotion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
NORFOLK this day, July 1 1 . 
2000. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REQBTER OF PROBATE 




COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket 00P1659EP 

In the Estate of 

MARY L.DOYLE 

Late Of NAPLES, FL 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 
To all persons interested 
in the above captioned 
estate, a petition has been 
presented praying that the 
photocopy of last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed, and that WALTER C. 
DOYLE of MEDWAY in the 
County of NORFOLK be 
appointed executor, named 
in the will to serve without 
surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO 
OBJECT THERETO, YOU 
OR YOUR ATTORNEY 
MUST FILE A WRITTEN 
APPEARANCE IN SAID 
COURT AT NORFOLK ON 
OR BEFORE TEN 
O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (1 0:00 AM) ON 
August 23, 2000. 

In additbn, you must file 
a written affidavit of 
objections to the petition, 
stating specific facts and 
grounds upon which the 
objection is based, within 
thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

.WITNESS. Hon. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
NORFOLK this day, July 11 , 
2000. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER QFFROBATE 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT department" 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 00P1689EP 

In the Estate of 

FRANK J. CASEY 

Late Of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

To all persons interested 
in the above captioned 
estate, a petition has been 
presented praying that the 
last will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
FRANCES H. CASEY of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
executor, named in the will to 
sen/e without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO 
OBJECT THERETO, YOU 
OR YOUR ATTORNEY 
MUST FILE A WRITTEN 
APPEARANCE IN SAID 
COURT AT NORFOLK ON 
OR BEFORE TEN 
O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (10:00 AM) ON 
August 23, 2000. 

In addition, you must file 
a written affidavit of 
objections to the petition, 
stating specific facts and 
grounds upon which the 
objection is based, within 
thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
NORFOLK this day, July 1 2, 
2000. 

THOMAS PAimCK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
7/20/00 



»» •» • • 






COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 00P1627EP 
In the Estate of 
CATHERINE M. 

BERTUCCI 

Late Of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 

To all persons interested 
in the above captioned 
estate, a petition has been 
presented praying that the 
last will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
ROSEMARIE SALUTI be 
appointed executor, named 
in the will to serve without 
surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO 
OBJECT THERETO, YOU 
OR YOUR ATTORNEY 
MUST FILE A WRITTEN 
APPEARANCE IN SAID 
COURT AT NORFOLK ON 
OR BEFORE TEN 
O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON (1 0:00 AM) ON 
August 16,2000. 

In addition, you must file 
a written affidavit of 
objections to the petition, 
stating specific facts and 
grounds upon which the 
objection is based, within 
thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other 
time as the court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
NORFOLK this day, June 30, 
2000. 

THOMAS PATRK;K HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
7/20/00 



• Protecting children 
through training in water 
safety, injury and disease 
prevention, and emergency 
response. This year 
volunteers went into South 
Shore elementary schools 
and taught over 7,000 
students how to be safe when 
home alone and over 8,000 
students water safety. 

The entrance fee for the 
tournament is $125 and 
includes a box lunch, greens 
fee, cart, an old fashion 
barbecue, awards and prizes. 
Hole sponsors, raffle prizes 
and cash donations are also 
welcome. 

For more information, call 
Jerry Dacey at Colonial 
Federal Savings Bank at 
(617) 471-0750, or Jackie 
Gardner at the Red Cross at 
(617)770-2600. 

St. John's 

Golf 

Outing 

July 24 

St. John's annual Golf 
Outing will be held 
Monday, July ,24 at 
Presidents' Golf Course. 

The cost to sponsor a 
hole is $100, and a sign will 
be placed at the hole 
indicating your support. 

For more information, 
call Declan Bresliln at (617) 
786- 1 64 1 , or Mike Gilcoine 
at (617) 773-5862 or (781) 
748-1 149, pager. 

Save Gas 

& Money. 

Shop Locally 



WE'RE 
FIGHTING 

FOR 
YOUR LIFE 



American Heart 
AssociatkMiJ 



« 



M I HHMHimW <JI«»I»| | 



Thursday, July 20, 2000 The Qimincy Sixn Page 31 




A NEW HALL 

Elks Lane, off 254 Quarry St 

For Weddings, Showers, 

Meetings and Banquets. 

QUINCYELKS 

847-6149 TF 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy 
K of C Building 

5 Mollis Avenue 

For Infonrtation Ploaae Call 

767-0519 



HAND TOOLS WANTED 

Wood or steel planes. Also, 
chisels, clamps, tool chests, 
old handtools, all trades (ma- 
chinist, pattern maker, watch- 
maker, etc.) shop lots. Also, 
antiquarian books, frames, 
paintings, crocks, lanterns. 
Antiques in estate lots. 
1-617-558-3839 



Wallpaper and Painting 

hy the Paperboy 
Gerard Shea 

Graduate of US School of Profaa- 

ahnal Papar Hanging, RuUand, VT 

617-471 '5089 




TF 



The Bryan Room VFW 

24 Broad St., Quincy 

2 newly renovated 
function halls available. 

Large room 400+ 
small room 150 guests. 
1-800-474-6234 tf 



Mfirina Bay area 

600 sq. ft. office /w 

parking $475/mo. 

617-328-1443 

328-0102 rr 



Roman Electric 

ResidenH Cmrtmaai, Alarm Systems, 
AC InataHathns, Fast Response, Free 
Estimates. Fully insured. Uc 1137566. 
781-601-6302 or 1-877-41 -ROMAN 

w«f us at www.Romanelectric.net tf 




Mo's Auto Service 

We come to you fast response. Free 
Estimates. No job too small. Qual- 
ity work done at reasonable rates. 
(617)827-7172 ,«.2 



HERITAGE HALL 

American Legion Post #114 
Weddings, Meetings, All 

Occasions 

114 Granite Ave., Milton 

617-696-3836 



TF 




Volunteers Wanted 

Varied and interesting volun- 
teer opportunities now avail- 
able at Beechwood on the 
Bay. Call Kathy for personal 
visit and center tour. 
471-5712 



7/20 




Prayer and understanding of 
God, also called Spirit, Truth, 
Mind, Soul and Love in the 
Bible, brings us into natural 
health as we realize our own 
native spirituality. Anyone can 
be helped in prayer and heal- 
ing - phone Finn (617) 448- 
1053, 6-7am, 8-1 0pm or week- 
ends. 



Mom, Dad, Lorene, Gene, 
Sandra, Fiona -- Happy An- 
niversaries, Birthdays, House 
Warmings, Summer Vaca- 
tions. Love, Robbie, Carol, 
Lindsay, Ryan, Allison, 
Adrienne. rno 



, Work 3 shifts &|Niy 
for summer vocolioii! 

OPEN HOUSE 

Wed., July 19 

Coll for oppt. & location 

Nurses needed for home visits 

RNsflo$50/visH 

RNslo$32/hr. 

misto$27/visH 

LPNsto$26/hr. 

Cm/HIUsto$17/lir. 

Reliable transportation 

preferred for HHAs 

1 yr. current exp. req'd 

888-691-4116 

www.favo[itenur$e$.com 



H & M CLEANERS 

Professional Cleaners 
Your Home Office & Restaurant 
For Free Estimates call 
Helena (781) 871-1552 
Martes (781) 681-9122 9/7 




EAT ALL DAY 
& MELT AWAY! 

Call (617) 696-8358 

Email: 

weightless @ma. freei. net 




TORO LAWN l\/IOWER 

Model 20479 

Self Propelled 

Cost New $550.00 

3 Years old "$150. 

Call 617-472-2318 



Precision Ideating & Air Conditioning 



ru 



CimftMf 



Qua Stef StufUt 

We Sen/ice & Install 

• Oil/Gas Heating Systems • Oil/Gas Water Heaters 

• Oil/Gas Burners • Residential Air Conditioning 

• Oil Tanks Removed & Replaced 

Sen/ice . . . It's Our Only Business 

Annual Tune Ups $70, Includes nozzle & oil filter 

617-472-8641 24 hour Emergency Servtee Jerry LaFlamme 



TF 



Timothy J. O'Brien 

Building & 

Remodeling 

Decks, Dornfiers, 

Additions, Siding, 

Windows, Repairs 

479-6685 

Licensed, Insured 
Free Estimates 

MA Reg. #116180 



TF 



No problem 
P.B. CONSTRUCTION 

Painting & Carpentry 
Replacement Windows 
617-967-6220 Lie & Ins. 

Ask for Paul Burke 7/27 



Lawford Plumbing 

Small Jobs • Faucet 
• Toilet & Heat Repairs 

• Drain Cleaning 

• Garbage Disposals 

Installed 

24 Hour Service. 

Master Lie. #7306 

78.1-849-6184 w? 




Windows Wash 
Please call 
328-4819 
328-0726 7/20 



Tina Turner Tickets 

Tina Turner tickets @ 
FleetCenter, 1st row bal- 
cony section 306, 2 tickets 
for 9/20/00 $120.00 
Call (617) 573-3016 



7/20 




PERSONAL LINES 
CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE 

Are you an experienced P/L CSR? We seek a detail-minded 
individual with a commitment to service to join our team. 
We offer continuing training, competitive salary and benefits 
package. Full or part time considered. 

Please send resume and references to: 

KATHY CASEY 
BERRY INSURANCE AGENCY 
685 Hancock Street, Quincy, MA 02170 
Fax 617-479-8761 m 



$9.00/HOUR TO START 



RGIS INVENTORY SPECIALISTS IS LOOKING FOR SELF- 
MOTIVATED INDIVIDUALS LOOKING FOR WORK IN A FAST- 
PACED ENVIRONMENT 

• NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY 

• RGIS HAS IMMEDIATE OPENINGS FOR INVENTORY 

AUDITORS 
•ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE RIGHT PEOPLE 

• DAY AND NIGHT/WEEKEND POSITIONS AVAILABLE. 
AVERAGE HOURS DEPEND ON YOUR SCHEDULING 
AVAILABILITY. 

• PAID TRAINING FOR QUALIFIED APPLICANTS. 

• MUST BE 18 YEARS OF AGE. 

• WILLING TO WORK IN/AROUND GREATER BOSTON AREA 

• HAVE ACCESS TO TRANSPORTATION. 

• MOST LOCATIONS T ACCESSIBLE. 

CALL THE BOSTON CENTRAL OFFICE AT 
617-484-1788 MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 9AM-4PM 

We are an equal opportunity employer 
rgis inventory specialists 



8/31 



MMUtfAMM 



FIELD REPS 

A National Marketing Re- 
searcti Company has great 
permanent PT positions. 
Control your own tiours 
within deadlines collecting 
data in retail stores. Must be 
available daytime hours and 
have own vehicle and insur- 
ance. Windows exp. a plus. 
Average 10-12 hrs/wk. No 
sales. Paid training. Call 1- 
800-317-6245 x 8888. EOE. 



7120 



HOUSECLEANER 

Clean by Maria Fatima 

A professional housecleaner 

10 experience 

excellent references 

Call 508-872-2613 a/io 



Les Young's 
Complete Handyman Services 

All the Little Things 

Carpentry, Painting, Window 

Repair & Replacement, 

Bathrooms, Tile Work, 

Cabinets/Tops 

617-328-5855 



8/3 



A & T VACUUM 

• $19.95 Overtiaul Special ' 
on any vacuum. 

• Sewing machine repairing 

• VCR repairing and cleaning 

• Sharpening 
(scissors, knives, etc.) 

• Greek XL Vacuums $249 

• Eiectroiux w/power nozzle $199 

• Used vacuums $45 & up 

27 Beale St., Woilaston 
479-5066 TF 



KEITH'S SERVICES 

Gen Building Maintenance 

Call for all your Interior 

tt Exterior needs 

Insured, Quality Workman^ip, Great Rates 
617-479-8852 781-254-6769 
781-834-1229 tf 



YARD SERVICES 

LAWNS MOWED, 
RAKING. TRIMMING, 

MULCHING, 

FERTILIZING ETC. 

ODD JOBS 

FREE EST 

CALL 617-770-4593 

1-800-670-0868 



TF 



M&J Residential 
Services 

Interior • Extenor painting, car- 
pentry, gutter sen/ices, yardworl( 
& roof repair, related handyman 
sen/ices. Free estimates. 
Mike (617) 328-8648 i(vi2 



E & K Construction 

Remodeling, Kitchens & Baths, 
Windows, Finished Work, Gen- 
eral Carpentry & Painting. 
Brendan 617-328-6240 
Demnot 617-787-4924 8/31 



Wedding s 

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMES 

Weddings from $998 

James Kazolias 

Ossipee, N.H. 
1-800-322-0454, evenings 7/22 



Your South Shore 
Headquarters For 
Appliance 
Service 
& Parts 
For All 
Major 
Appliances 




hancock tire 
& appliance 

115 Franklin Street 
South Quincy •472-1710 



YARD WORK CO. 

• Reliable Lawn 
Mowing Service 

• Expert Busti & Hedge 
Trimming 

• Yard Cleanup 

• Fertilize Lawn 

• Mulch Work 

Experienced ' 
FREE Estimate 
Call Bill Fielding 

471-6124 TF 



T. Lynch Electric 

Residential, Commerciai 
No job too small. 

Fully insured, lie #39339, 

free estimates 

781-335-4081 8/17 



CARPENTRY 

"It's A Little Job" 

Expensive, NO! 

Your price will fix it rigfit 

617-472-0556 m^ 



O'Meara's 
Painting Co. 

Great Rates 
617-840-4987 



7/13 



FRED'S HANDYMAN 

Looking for small mainte- 
nance work, painting, car- 
pentry, window repairs & re- 
placements. Call Fred 472- 
8778 



8/24 



Sun Classified Ads 
Get Resultsi 




MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 



INDEX 

G Services 

□ For Sale 
G Autos 
G Boats 

□ For Rent 

□ Wanted 

□ Help Wanted 

□ Work Wanted 

□ Pets 

□ Lost & Found 
Q Real Estate 
G Antiques 

□ Flea Markets 

□ Yard Sales 
G Instruction 
G Day Care 
G Personal 

G Miscellaneous 



RATES 
IWEEK 



G 



$5.50 for one insertion, up to 20 words, 
1 00 for each additional word. 

3-7 WEEKS G $5.00 per insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 insertions of 

the same ad, 100 each additional word. 

8-12 WEEKS G $4.60 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 8- 1 2 insertions 

of the same ad 100 for each additional word. 

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weeks in 

COPY: 



$4,30 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 13 or more 
insertions of the same ad 100 for each additional word. 

for the following ad to run 



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DRADUNEt MONDAY, 5:00PM. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMBER IN.AD. . . 

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rsTTiTi 



...'.MMulJAiiMl^CWWiU 4 



Page 32 TlMQulnoySun Thursday, July 20, 2000 



McCauley Puts Brakes On Bond Issues 



(Cont'd from page 1) that they were simply pre- sented to the council as soon 





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as possible for infonnational 
purposes. 

The four bond issues 
tabled were: $600,000 for 
cost of various department 
equipment, including 
$100,000 for DPW needs 
and a controversial 
$500,000 designated for fire 
equipment apparatus; 
$200,000 for acquiring land 
for public parks or play- 
grounds or public domain; 
$500,000 for construction of 
public ways or the extension 
and widening thereof, in- 
cluding land damages; and 
$400,000 for construction, 
remodeling, and repairs to 
Crane Public Library. 

The $600,000 bond issue 
caused concerns Monday, 
night when William Ariente, 
president of the Quincy 
Firefighters Union Local 
792, was allowed to address 
the council before 
McCauley 's objection and 
expressed concern that the 
$500,000 available to the 
QFD would not be enough 
to purchase a ladder truck 
for Ward 4, which he, as 
well as Ward 4 Councillor 
Michael D'Amico, has 



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Stated is a top priority at 
numerous council meetings. 

Ariente said $500,000 
was "not sufficient for the 
purchase of a ladder truck" 
and urged that the matter be 
sent to conunittee for reso- 
lution by all parties in- 
volvcfd. 

Council President Paul 
Harold supported Ariente's 
claim that a ladder truck for 
West Quincy was necessary 
and advocated that, in this 
one instance, the DPW's 
needs be "squeezed out" to 
acquire the ladder truck, 
which he estimated to cost 
between $600,000 to 
$700,000. "Hie ladder truck 
is a top priority, and it be- 
comes more so as those 
buildings at Crown Colony 
become higher and higher," 
Harold said. 

Harold noted that several 
officials, from the mayor to 
ward councillors to coun- 
cillors-at-large, had gone on 
record in favor of a West 
Quincy ladder truck and that 
anything else "would be 
inconsistent with public 
pronouncements." 

Reached for comment 
Tuesday, Sheets said he had 
been quite clear on that par- 
ticular issue at various 
meetings and did not under- 
stand the confusion. "It (the 
ladder truck) is certainly a 
top priority, but we did not 



designate a specific piece of 
equipment because we first 
have to have the fire study 
done." 

Sheets explained that 
$100 000 of the bond would 
go to the Maintenance Divi- 
sion of the DPW to pur- 
chase trucj^s to transport 
tools and manpower for 
repair jobs from one public 
building to another, with 
money left over going to- 
wards new pick-up trucks 
for the department 

The $SOOJ0OO, said 
Sheets, would go to fire 
equipment q>paratus based 
on the recommendation of 
the fire study so that the 
funds are wisely spent. 
"According to (the DPW's) 
Lester Gerry, it will cost $1 
million to reconfigure the 
West Quincy Hre station to 
house that truck, far more 
money than to actually pur- 
chase the truck itself," 
Sheets said. "Do we really 
want to spend $1 million at 
one fire station? What about 
the others?" 

Sheets said that he would 
let the experts of the fire 
study have their say and 
that, if the ladder truck is 
still the first priority, addi- 
tional funds would be ap- 
propriated for its purchase. 

There is of yet no set 
timetable for the fire study. 



Quincy High Physicals Aug. 17 



Physicals for interested 
athletes at Quincy High 
School will be held Thurs- 
day, Aug. 17 in the QHS 
Nurses' Office from 8:30 
a.m. to 12 p.m., announces 
QHS athletic director Ed 



Miller. 

The make-up date is 
Thursday, Aug. 24 in the 
North Quincy High School 
Nurses' Office from 8:30 
a.m. to 12 p.m. 



• 3800 series V6 engine 

• Front & side air bags 

• Anti-lock brakes 

• Ail conditioning 

• 6-way power seat 

• Power windows 

• Power door locks 

• Tilt steering 

• Cruise control 

• Remote keyless entry 

• AM-FM cassette 



SA\h()\LRS MOO 



$25,193 Grig, list price 
$500 lockage discount 
$500 Sell down incentive 
$1000 Factory rebate 
$1 198 South Shore Buick discount 
$3198 Total Savings 
Vk have 24 spedaOy packaged (no package deviation available) Buick 
LeSabres available for tiiis promotion. One time oniy....tdii]e suf^ies last. 

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smart tuck, Mh« cd, 0*8 dean. «9S39a 

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V6. at, piwpl. stereo, dean. wht. 
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Low mileage. #06361 



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3800 series VB, bfighl nM., a/c pjeat 
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16,380 M3700 ''"'Um 



itUKKBRIir 

Fanner drijf wM, (^ MMKi^ pllkM IO«36i 

WAS $15,500 



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WEATHER FORECAST 

Friday: Partly Sunny, Highs 80-85 ^3 
Saturday:Partly Sunny, 80's ^ 
Sunday: Chance Of Showers, 78 C? 



The Quincy 




*f£3 



VOL. 32 No. 44 



Historic Quince's Hometown Weekly Newspaper 



Thursday, July 27, 2000 



^^^Kiir 




FACE-TO-FACE with a gargoyle -- This gargoyle, one of four 
that adorn the steeple of Bethaiiy CongregatioDal Church in 
Quuicy Center, is structually unsound and will be removed 



this week. It was damaged by lightning during a storm July 
18. Photo was taken 120 feet up in an aerial bucket truck. 

(Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Bosworlh) 



Structurally Unsound From Lightning Strike 

Bethany Church 2000-Pound 
Gargoyle Must Be Removed 



By CRAIG SALTERS 

Question: how do you 
remove a 2,000 pound gar- 
goyle wedged two-feet 
deep into the corner of a 
church steeple from a 
height of 120 feet? 

Answer: as carefully 
and as cautiously as pos- 
sible. 

This is the task facing 
Robert Pasqualucci of 
Louis Pasqualucci & Son, 
Inc., who will oversee the 
removal of a damaged gar- 
goyle today (Thursday) 
from the steeple of 
Bethany Congregational 
Church, Spear and 
Coddington Sts., after a 
bolt of lightning struck the 
church steeple last week. 

Thankfully, no one was 
injured, but the lightning 
sent a 600-pound piece of 
a concrete pinnacle crash- 
ing down inside the church 
and almost caused one of 
the church's four famous 
gargoyles to crack off, 
which could have added 



considerably to the danger. 

Overall damage is now 
estimated at over $500,000. 

"The gargoyle is not 
structurally sound," ex- 
plained Pasqualucci, who 
noted that the entire area be- 
low the 2,000 pound fixture 
has been barricaded off for 
safety reasons. "If it were to 
come off, it would go 
through the roof, through the 
second floor, through the 
first floor, and land in the 
basement." 

And even though Louis 
Pasqualucci & Son, Quincy- 
based union contractors, 
have over 60 years masonry 
experience and are consid- 
ered specialists in the field of 
church construction and res- 
toration, Pasqualucci admits 
the job will be slow going, 
with full restoration not ex- 
pected until spring of 2001. 
"This will be a very deli- 
cate job," said Pasqualucci. 
"The gargoyle itself is built 
at least two feet deep inside 
{Cont'd On Page 12) 














A CLOSE-UP look at the Bethany Congregational Church 
steeple which was damaged by Ughtning July 18. A large 
pinnacle which was hh by lightning toppled from the top of 
the steeple and crashed through a roof below. At far left is a 
similar pinnacle which was not damaged. The gargoyle m 
the foreground, cracked by lightning, wlU be removed and 
replaced. Other Photos on Page 12. 



Task Force Votes 
Unanimously For Site 

Quincy Ave. 
Choice For 

New QHS 

By CRAIG SALTERS 

The School Building Needs Task Force voted 
unanimously Tuesday morning not to consider any 
other site but Quincy Avenue for the new Quincy 
High School. 



task Force Chairperson 
and DPW Commissioner 
David Colton and the rest of 
the task force also approved 
motions to demolish the 
Center for Technical Edu- 
cation (CTE), close off 
Woodward Ave. to create a 
"green belt" for the future 
Central Middle School 
(current QHS), continue 
plans to fill marshland up to 
Central Artery for new ball- 
fields, and to resolve land 
and parking issues at the 
Quincy Ave. high school 
site. 

The demolition of the 
CTE, said Mayor James 
Sheets, requires approval of 
the School Committee 
whereas any decision to 
close off Woodward Ave- 
nue would require a positive 



vote by the City Council. 

"Basically, the plan ap- 
proved by the state (for a 
$55 million new high school 
and a $25 million renovated 
Central Middle School) is 
the plan which we will go 
by," said Sheets, who added 
that the proposed openings 
of the new QHS in 2004 and 
Central in 2006 "are still 
good." 

Sheets also said he was 
confident the city would 
now be eligible for 90 per- 
cent state reimbursement for 
the two schools, as opposed 
to the expected 63 percent, 
thanks to a bill passed by 
the Legislature removing 
racial equity considerations 
from the reimbursement 
decision and grandfathering 
(Cont'd on page 28) 



O'Brien Brings 
Good News: 
Extra $1.2M 



State Treasurer Shannon 
O'Brien stopped by Mayor 
James Sheets' office Tues- 
day to deliver $14,000 
worth of good news. 

Along the way, O'Brien 
promised an additional $1.2 
million in good news would 
arrive by mid-August. 

The first amount, that of 
$14,332.68, refers to the 
Office of the Treasurer's 
return of abandoned prop- 
erty to the city of Quincy. 

The $1.2 million figure is 
the amount of additional 
lottery funds Quincy will 
receive this year over and 
above last year's allocation. 

Altogether, O'Brien said, 
the city will receive 
$10,384,514 in lottery funds 
sometime in August after 



the Legislature passes its 
supplemental budget. 

"This is a good news day 
for the city of Quincy," 
O'Brien told Sheets. 

Sheets said that there 
were no definite plans for 
the additional lottery funds 
but that he expected at least 
$1 million would go into the 
city's Stabilization Fund, a 
cash reserve for which the 
mayor has set a goal of 5 
percent of the city's annual 
budget, or roughly $8 mil- 
lion. 

Sheets expressed his 
thanks to O'Brien but added 
that he was particularly im- 
pressed by the $14,000 in 
return of abandoned prop- 
erty because it sent a strong 
(Cont'd on page 13) 



■■■MiHii 



Page 2 T1&* Quliaoy Sun Thursday, July 27, 2000 




HANCOCK ST. was '^wall to wall** with shoppers during last week's 30th annual Quincy 
Center Sidewalk Festival sponsored by the Quincy Center Business and Professional 
Association. Hancock St was closed off to traffic and turned hito a pedestrian mall for 
the three days. 




DONNA MARIE and her puppet friends kept the youngsters interested and involved 
during her performances Saturday at the Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival 

(Maralin Manning Photos) 



Ideal Weather A Big Factor 

Sidewalk Festival One Of The Most Successful 



By TOM HENSHAW 

Veteran participants and 
comparative newcomers 
alike agreed that last week's 
30th annual Quincy Center 
Sidewalk Festival, held in 
near perfect weather, was 



one of the most successful 
of all. 

"Excellent ... a record 
year," said Jeff Bertman, 
whose Roger's Jewelry 
store has been taking part in 
the festival for all 30 years 



of its existence. "Last year 
was good and this year was 
better." 

Bertman had called last 
year's three-day extrava- 
ganza "the best ever." 

"It was wonderful," en- 
thused Paula Stoltz, pro- 



prietor of Urban Anna, a 
two-year participant. "It Was 
much better than last year. 

"We had a tent last year 
but this year we set up just 
outside the door and we 
were very successful." 

"The weather was a sig- 





OscoDrua 

475 Hancock St., North Quincy 

Meeting the grocery 
needs of Wollaston 




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•8888 



& North Quincy . . . 
Now that's a real victory I 

This weeks FOODMART specials 

Black Mountain 

Premium Gourmet 

Gold Coffee 




50(1: OFF 




Any Item in our 

new & expanded 

frozen food 

section 



Reg. price, $1.99 & up only. 

Prices good now thru Wed., Au^st 1, 1000 

One coupon per customer. 



Single Serving 
(1.4 oz.) 




J 



Prices good now thru Wed., August 2, 2O00. One coupon per customer. 



r 



SUNDAY BREAKFAST SPECIAL 

4 for $5 

• 1 dozen large eggs • 1 quart of West Lynn Orange Juice 

• 1 gallon of West Lynn Milk (1%, 1% or fat free) 

• Your Choice of the Boston Globe or Herald 

Offer valid while supplies last, one special per coupon. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Valid Sunday 7/30/00 only. 

Valid only at 475 Hancock Street, North Quincy location. 

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Gas, Electric and Phone Bills also accepted. (Mon-Fri 9am-3pm) 



A 



y 




CHARLIE RYDER assists a customer at Ryder's Home 
Decor & More, one of the busiest shopping spots during 
the Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival 



niflcant factor in the success 
of the event," said Maralin 
Manning, who is the execu- 
tive director of the spon- 
soring Quincy Center Busi- 
ness and Professional Asso- 
ciation. 

"Three bright, sunny 
days in a row, it is the best 
'weather luck' in several 
years. When it is a near rec- 
ord 100 degrees, as it has 
been in the last few years, a 
hot city street is not so in- 
viting. 

"It is certainly a big 
challenge to fill a city street 
nearly a half mile long in 
mid-July with people for a 
full 28 hours. Nothing is 
ever perfect but we continue 

to work to jnake it that 
way." 

Tents and canopied 
booths held center stage on 
Hancock Street from Gran- 



ite to School Streets as 
shoppers strolled the half 
mile, examining and pur- 
chasing the bargains offered 
by the merchants. 

Hancock Street was 
closed to vehicular traffic 
from Granite Street to Han- 
cock Court, turning the 
city's main business thor- 
oughfare into a pedestrian 
mall for the day. 

Even outside the festi- 
val's central area, sidewalk 
commerce was thriving un- 
der the happy skies. 

"It went very well," said 
Joanne Dondero, whose 
Abigail's Crossing is lo- 
cated about a hundred yards 
north of the center of action. 

"We weren't under a tent 

this year but it didn't seem 

to make any difference. We 

sold in and out of the store. 

(Cont'd on page 28) 






a^6l7:472-8250 



Thursday, July 27, 2000 Tl&« Qulnoy Sun Page 3 



MDCSays: 

WoUaston Beach Tests 

Results Reported As 

Soon As Possible 

By CRAIG SALTERS daily, with results posted in- but were at least 3-5 years 

Already this summer, house and to various media away, estimated the average 

WoUaston Beach has posted ** quickly as possible. The cost of a water sampling at 

IS many "red flag" un- MDC, DiPietro said, sam- $20. 

pies the water Thursday and Liebman also said the 

MDC interns test the re- Boston Globe article incor- 

maining days in conjunction rectly listed the water test 

with the Massachusetts unit of measurement as parts 

Water Resources Authority Per million, noting the cor- 

(MWRA). "For those five f^ct unit of measurement is 

beaches, we collect every number of (bacteria) colo 



lealthy swimming days — 
line - as it did for all of last 
;ummer. 

True enough, say MDC 
)fficials, but the water at 
WoUaston Beach is still the 
;leanest it's been in recent 
nemory. 

What's more, MDC offi- 
:ials take issue with a part 
)f a recent Boston Globe 
irticle on Wollaston's water 
]uality which says residents 
eel misled by the MDC 
;oncerning red flag post- 
ngs. 

The article said Quincy 
esidents were upset that 




day," DiPietro said. 

The problem, DiPietro 
says, is that the two indica- 
tor organisms tested for -- 
fecal coliform and entero- 
coccus - require a 24-hour 
lab incubation period. 

Add to that the lag time 
to and from the labs, said 
DiPietro, and there's a 30 
hour minimum between 



lag warnings, red for un- testing and test results. 



lealthy and blue for healthy, 
vere actually based on 
eadings done the day be- 
bre. 
Those at the MDC argue 



And is that the best the 
MDC can do? 

Yes, DiPietro said, and 
that's the best anyone can 
do given cost factors and 



hat the article did not fully today's testing technology. 
5xplain the required 24-hour "From a bacteria testing 



ncubation period for the 
vater tests, which make it 
mpossible to post beach 
esults for anything but 
/esterday's conditions. 

"The MDC process of 
vater testing and reporting, 
;ontrary to what the Boston 
jlobe niay have been sug- 
gesting, is actually consid- 
;red an excellent program," 
.aid Patrick Flynn, South 



standpoint, anything less is 
impossible," DiPietro said. 

Matthew Liebman, New 
England Region Beach Co- 
ordinator for the Environ- 



nies per 100 milliliters of 
water, or roughly a pint. 

According to the EPA, 
said Liebman, the 
"acceptable level of risk" 
for beaches is 1 to 100, 
meaning that there should 
only be a 1 percent risk of 
illness to the general popu- 
lation, emphasizing that 
some communities might 
favor more protection but 
that it would be unwise to 
have anything less. 

Liebman said one of the 
most reliable \S'ays to meas- 
ure water quality was to 
view data over an extended 
period of time and make 
sure the average bacteria 
colony count is not over 35. 
However, Liebman added, a 
person should not swim in 
water which has had a re- 



THIS IS NO LONGER a familiar summer daily scene at Wollaston Beach because of 
water quality. (Quincy Sun photo) 

Again, Liebman stressed already spent $6 million to To make his point, Col- 

that, even at those high lev- combat the problem: $ 5 ton noted that bacteria 

million to repair drainage counts at the repaired Rice 

sub areas 7 (Sachem St.) Rd. section were, on aver- 

and 8 (Rice Rd.) along with age, just 22 while averages 

$1 million to rehabilitate the at other repaired sites were 



els, the risk of illness was 
minimal. 

Quincy Health Commis- 
sioner M. Jane Gallahue 



reminded residents of a very North Quincy Interceptor, 
simple rule of thumb: do not the area's major sewer line. 



mental Protection Agency cent reading of over 104, 



swim at Wollaston Beach 
within 48 hours of a rain 
storm, explaining that it 
takes that long for the tides 
to naturally flush out the 
system from any sewer pipe 
contamination. 

Gallahue also urged resi- 
dents to clean up after their 
. pets and not dump motor 
oils or paints into city catch 
basins, as it is dumped di- 
rectly into the bay. 

DPW Commissioner 

David Colton said the cause 
of the problem was clearly 



Repairs to drainage sub 
area 6 (Channing St.) are 
scheduled for 2001 and , 
after that, improvements 
will be made to sub area 4 
(Milton Rd.) 

The other sub areas, 
Colton said, are much 
smaller and do not pose a 
significant concern. 

Colton cautioned that 
any major new program, 
such as removal of the eight 
outfall pipes or sewage 
treatment, would cost in the 
tens of millions of dollars 



(EPA) said DiPietro was 
correct with regards to the 
24-hour incubation period 
and added the enterococcus 
test — which the EPA feels 
to be a better indicator of 



regardless of bacteria count 
average. 



the city's aging sewer sys- and might not yield the best 
tem but that the city has results. 



not much higher than the 
safety threshold of 200, 
whereas unrepaired sites 
gave readings of between 
4,000 and 11,000. 

"It's the sewer pipes 
which are causing the prob- 
lem," Colton said. "The 
question is: is it worth 
spending tens of millions of 
dollars for a 10 percent im- 
provement?" 

The city currently repairs 
sewer systems through its 
Sewer Rehabilitation Fund, 
which is derived from a tax 
on development. 

The MDC's "beaches 
water quality hotline" is 
(617) 727-5264. 



Regional Supervisor for the unhealthy swimming condi- 

VIDC. "We are as interested tions -- required a 48 hour 

n the public health as any- incubation period as late as 

)ne could be and are very 1997 until new EPA meth- 

iensitive to post test results, ods were successfully field- 

vhether good or bad, as tested by the MDC. "The 

]uickly as possible. There is MDC has really been taking 

ID delay." the lead (on testing)," 

MDC Environmental Liebman said. "They have 



Engineer Paul DiPietro ex- 
)lained that Wollaston 
Beach is one of five MDC 
reaches w!\ich get tested 



one of the best programs 
available." 

Liebman, who said better 
tests were being developed 




by George P, Murphy 



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Pfcge4 Tlf Quincy Sun Thimday, July 27, 2000 



Cpinicn 



\ ■ 



Oiii-lTio3r 




USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co. Inc. 

1372 Hancock St. Quincy. MA 02169 

Henry W. Bosworth. Jr. Publisher 
Robert H. Bosworth Editor 

3S< per copy. $16.00 per year by maM in Quincy 
$18.00 per year by mal outside Quincy. $22.00 out of state. 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Periodicals postage paid at Bmton. MA 

Postmaster Send address change to 

The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy MA 02168 



tor typographical arrora In 
in which ttw typoQrapNcsl 



Tht Quinoy Sun — unwi no 
■KarHMiranti but wrii raprint IhH part d I 



airaroocura. 





r . V 



By Henry Bosworth 



A Senior's Fond Memories 



Former Fire Chief 

Favors Rezoning At 

Quincy Ave., Water St. 



Former Quincy Fire De- 
partment Chief Edward 
Barry spoke in favor of re- 
zoning Mass Electric prop- 
erty near the intersection of 
Water St. and Quincy Ave. 
at a recent public hearing on 
the issue. 

The hearing, which was 
recessed until Sept. 5, con- 
cerns the rezoning from 
Business B to Residence B 
of land located "on the 
northeasterly side of Sum- 
mer St. from numbers 32 to 
70 and the northwesterly 
side of Water St. from num- 
bers 3 to 27 and the south- 
erly side of Quincy Ave. 
from numbers 47 to 65." 

Barry, who has lived 73 
years on Summer St., said 
he remembered the now 
vacant parcel from its days 
as a site for Quincy Electric, 
then Quincy Electric Light 
and Power Company, then 
Mass Electric until the cotn- 
pany moved operations to 



Rte. 18 in Weymouth. 

"It's lain fallow for at 
least 18 or 19 years," Barry 
said of the parcel. "It would 
make an ideal playground 
and it would be a real plus 
for the city." 

Several other residents 
spoke in favor of the pro- 
posed re-zoning but Michael 
Delia Barba, representing 
Mass Electric, opposed the 
move and argued that the 
city was guilty of "spot- 
zoning", or singling out 
Mass Electric's property for 
a zoning change. 

Councillor Daniel Ray- 
mond!, who proposed the 
zoning change, said the 
move was not a case of 
spot-zoning and cited the 
predominantly residential 
nature of the Water St. area. 

Raymond! also said the 
city's Planning Board had 
voted unanimously in favor 
of the change. 




SPARGO 




THE mmior CHANNEL 

On July 30, 1€13, in Jamestown, Va., the first elected 
l^islative astembiy in the New World — the House of 
Boigesses — cooveoed in the choir of the town's church — 
Od Inly 25, 1832. the first reooided nuhroad accident in 
U.S. history occurred when four peopk were thrown off a 
vacant car on the Oranite Railway near Quincy, Mass. One 
oum was killed and the others were seriously injured. ... On 
Ja^ 26, 1908. the Office of the Chief Examiner, an organi- 
zation that would later become ibt Burean of InvestigaticMi 
and dm the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), was 
created by U.S. Attorney General Charles J. Bonaparte. ... 

On July 25, 1917, Mata Hari, the archetype of the seductive 
female spy, was sentenced to death in France for allegedly 
selling French oiilitary secrets to the Germans. ... On July 
27, 1921. at the University of Toronto, Canadian scientists 
I^erick Banting and Charles Best successfully isolated 
insulin — a hormone that they believed could prevent dia- 
betes — for the first time. ... On July 27, 1953, the Korean 
War armistice was signed at Panmunjom, ending three 
years of bloody fighting. ... On July 24, 1969. Apollo 11, 
the U.S. spacecraft that had taken the first astronauts to the 
surface of the moon, safely returned to earth. ... On July 28, 
1976, early in the nxmiing in eastern China, a massive 
earthquake of 8.2 magnitude struck Tangshan, an industrial 
city with a population of about one million people. The 
Chinese government estimated that up to 250,000 people 
had been killed, making it the deadliest earthquake of die 
20th century. ... On July 29, 1961, nearly 4 billion people 
in 74 countries tuned in to wimess the marriage of Charles, 
heir to die Brituh throne, to a young English schoolteacher 
■med Lady Diana Spencer. 

e 2000 Ki^ FH*n> Syad.. be 



Ed Sparge, Quincy 's "Ambassador of Good Health,** 
saw most of the 20th century. 

Kow a still enthusiastic 92 (he practices what he 
preaches about good health) he wonders what the new 
century will bring. And plans to hang around to see. 

But he and others his age — and 
some younger and some older - 
certainly got to see a lot of things 
come about in the 20th century. 

Ed once asked in this column: 
Just who is a Senior Citizen and 
what is one? 

And proceeded to answer the 
question with a bumper crop of 
interesting tidbits. 

"We (Senior Citizens" were here,** he^said, "before 
television, penicillin, polio and flu shots, antibiotics 
and frisbees were dreamed of. 

And before, he recalled: 

Frozen foods, nylon, dacron, Xerox, Kinsey, fluo- 
rescent lights, directional signals, radials, automatic 
shift, tubeless tires, condos, Social Security, ball point 
pens, stretch limousines, Scotch tape, VCRs, TV din- 
ners, the Expressway, the mid-Cape highway, comput- 
ers. 

"We were before pantyhose and hula hoops," he 
noted. "Before Hawaii and Alaska became states. Be- 
fore men wore long hair and earrings and women wore 
tuxedos. 

"We got married first and then lived together. 

"When we were young and innocent, money was 
tight but neighbors weren't. In fact they shared and 
shared alike. Locked doors in our homes were unheard 
of and unneccessary. 

"We were before yogurt, plastic, the 40-hour work 
week and the minimum wage. In our day, closets were 
for clothes, not for coming out of. Bunnies were small 
rabbits and not scantily-clad girls or Volkswagens. 

"We were before Grandma Moses, cup-sizine bras. 
Giris wore Peter Pan collars and thought cleavage was 
something butchers did. 

Seniors, he also noted, were before Batman, Rudolph 
the Red-Nosed Reindeer, Sn^py, vitamin pills, DDT, 
disposable diapers and pizza. 

"The exploration of Space was unheard of. So were 



air-conditioned cars, cake mixes and those magic 
'money machines* at the bank." 

Senior citizens, he added, were also before: micro- 
waves, credit cards, FM radio, tape recorders, electric 
typewriters, word processors, electronic music, disco- 
dancing, rock music. 

"When we were growing up we thought fast food 
was something you ate only on a diet or during Lent. 
And AIDS was unheard of, thank the Lord. 

"The phrase ' making out" in our day referred to how 
you performed on an exam and not . . . And 'scoring' 
meant innocently keeping score at a baseball game." 

Cigarette smoking was fashionable, he recalled, but 
"grass was for mowing, pot was something you cooked 
in and Coke was a refreshing drink." 

"You could get a Chevy coupe for $500 in early de- 
pression days. And gas to run it went for 12 cents a 
gallon. 

"We were before night baseball, artificial turf, the 
designated hitter. And teams traveled by train." 

Spargo, an ardent baseball fan, fondly remembered 
the Boston Braves who thoug|i financially strapped 
themselves, let kids into the games for 10 cents Satur- 
day afternoons as members of the "Knot Hole Gang." 

And adults could sit in the bleachers at both Braves 
Field and Fenway Park for a quarter. 

"There were no jet planes, helicopters, interstate 
highways or vending machines. But a nickel bought 
you a ride on a street car, or a phone call, a good-sized 
Hershey or any other candy bar. And, enough stamps 
to mail a letter and five post cards. 

And for a "thin dime," he recalled, you could spend 
Saturday afternoon at a local movie theatre seeing an- 
other chapter of a continuing serial, cartoons, previews 
of coming attractions and two movies known as a 
double feature. 

"Yes, sir-ee," he said proudly, "we are today's se- 
nior citizens, a hardy bunch when you think of how 
radically our little corner of the worid has changed. 
And of the major adjustments we have had to make." 

An interesting century, the 20th. 

Progress, of course, is supposed to march on. And if 
it does, the 21st century should top the 20th for change. 

But for sentimental reasons, Ed will take the 20th 
and all its fond memories. 



Cooperation Pays Off On 
New Abigail Adams Wayside 



Besides being a Htting 
tribute to the Adams Fam- 
ily, the new interpretative 
wayside exhibit at the base 
of the Abigail Adams statue 
in Quincy Center is a good 
example of the benefits of a 
public/private partnership. 

That's because, said 
Adams National Historic 
Park (Adams NHP) Super- 
intendent Marianne Peak, 
the Adams NHP received a 
grant for the wayside from 
the National Park Service 
Cost Share Program, a grant 
made possible by the com- 
bined efforts of the Adams 
NHP and the Quincy Part- 
nership. 

The principal purpose of 
the NPS Challenge Cost 
Share Program, said Peak, is 
to work with such groups as 
the -Quincy Partnership in 



order to support a public 
project for educational, in- 
terpretive, resource protec- 
tion, and stewardship pur- 
poses. 

The Quincy Partnership - 
- an all-volunteer non-profit 
organization comprised of 
roughly 15 members from 
the city's business, govern- 
ment, and civic communi- 
ties — sponsored many 
events to raise funds for the 
bronze statue depicting 
Abigail Adams and 10-year 
old son John Quincy 
Adams. 

And it was that private 
fundraising. Peak said, 
which qualified the Adams 
National Historic Park for 
the grant award and made 
the applicaticMi successful. 

The Adams NHP had 
substantial involvement 



with the Quincy Partnership 
during the statue project, 
which was created by artist 
Lloyd Lillie of Newton, 
MA. The new wayside 
identifies the figures and 
features a quotation from 
the letters of Abigail Adams 
to John Quincy when he 
was 10 years of age. 

The quotation reads: 
"Improve your understand- 
ing for acquiring usefull 
knowledge and virtue, such 



as will render you an orna- 
ment to society, and Honour 
to your Country, and a 
Blessing to Your Parents ... 
Your ever affectionate 
mother, AA." 

The wayside will be 
viewed by the general pub- 
lic and some 80,000 park 
visitors and is a destination 
along the Quincy Historic 
Trail. 

Special wayside dedica- 
tion ceremonies were held 
June 30. 




The first i» daltctor WM davaloptd by John Laraen in 
1021. 



ipi« 



Thursday, July 27, 2000 Tbe Quiney Sun Page 5 



Scenes From Yesterday 




THIS POSTCARD showing the Norfolk Downs rail- 
road depot is dated October, 1928. Note the auto 
stopped at the gate at the grade crossing. At this time 
more than 150 trains a day passed through this grade 
crossing which was closed shortly after this picture 
was taken. There once was a plan to build a n\jor east- 
west roadway here, which would have connected 



Holbrook and Billings Roads to Wollaston Boulevard. 
Other than the railroad tracks, only the buildings on 
the left remain in this scene today. The Pneumatic Scale 
factory on the right is now the site of a Super Stop & 
Shop and a Citizens Bank branch is on the depot site. 
From the Collection of Tom Galvin 



July 28 - Aug. 3 

1950 

50 Years Ago 



Rkadkrs Forum 



Congratulations And Well Done, Tony 



(The Following letter was 
submitted to The Sun by the 
writer for. F\iblication) 
. July 3, 2000 

Mr. Anthony Siciliano 

Deputy Director of Emer- 
gency Management 

55 Sea St. 

Quincy 

Congratulations on your 
latest award in being named 
Emergency Manager of the 
Year by the Northeast States 
Emergency Consortium. It is 
most satisfying when such 
an honor is bestowed by one ' s 
peers. They are the people 



who know what your varied 
assignments involve and your 
readiness to accept the most 
difficult of tasks is most ex- 
emplary. 

Your assistance in com- 
ing to the aid of Quincy se- 
nior citizens on many occa- 
sions over the years has been 
most valued. 

During the crisis to save 
Quincy Hospital from clos- 
ing its doors you were very 
much in the front lines in 
providing the type of back- 
up that you and your col- 
leagues are qualified to ren- 



der. 

On the last Sunday of No- 
vember the annual Quincy 
Christmas Parade would not 
be able to kick off as success- 
fully as it does without your 
forces and assistance at-the- 
ready. You and your col- 
leagues are an integral part 
of all major parades held in 
the City of Quincy. 

Over the years you have 
acquired valuable experience 
in handling emergency situ- 
ations particularly in times 
of floods, fires, storms, di- 
sasters, and accidents. 

You and your colleagues 



should be justly proud of the 
many accomplishments of 
Quincy's Emergency Man- 
agement services. You have 
.demonstrated dedication and 
know-how in all types of situ- 
ations. 

1 wish you continued suc- 
cess in providing these 
needed services to the entire 
city of Quincy and, in par- 
ticular, to the senior citizens, 
the fastest growing popula- 
tion of any city of compa- 
rable size in the United States. 

John Noonan 

Chairman 

Quincy Council on Aging 



Unhappy About GOP Delegate Vote 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: Along with more than 1 GO Philadelphia (July 3 1 to Aug. 

On April 29, 1 attended odierpebple,l voted for three 3). Their nearest coinpetitors 
the Republican Delegate delegates whose views 1 share received about 25 votes. 
Caucus for the 1 0th Congres- to represent me at the Repub- I was unhappy to learn 
sional District held in Ply- lican National Convention in several weeks later that some- 
mouth, one in the State Republican 



Party had arbitrarily canceled 
the vote and named other 
people as delegates. 

Francis D. Doherty 

Billings St. 

Quincy 



Urges The Public To Conserve Drinking Water 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

On behalf of water utili- 
ties throughout Massachu- 
setts, I urge the public to con- 
serve our vital but limited 
drinking water supplies and 
to obey any local voluntary 
or mandatory water restric- 
tions this summer. 

Heavy spring and early 
summer rainfalls have re- 
plenished water supplies in 
some communities. How- 
ever, total precipitation 
throughout the year, not just 
during on€ season, affects 
water supplies. 

New England relies pri- 
marily on winter snowfalls 
to recharge groundwater 
sources (aquifers). Unlike 
rain, which often washes into 
rivers, then into oceans, snow 
slowly melts, seeps into the 
ground, and replenishes aqui- 
fer systems. 

Given the lack of snow- 
fall during the past three win- 
ters and long-range forecasts 



from the National Weather 
Service for above-normal 
temperatures this sununer, 
many Massachusetts com- 
muiyties could face critical 
water shortages during the 
next few months. 

As a result, voluntary or 
mandatory restrictions on 
outdoor water use may be 



necessary to make sure that ^ 
sufficient water supplies are 
available to service homes 
and businesses; to maintain 
adequate water pressure, and 
to fight fires. 

For more information 
ontact die local water depart- 
ment, the Massachusetts De- 
partment of Environmental 



Protection at (800) 426-479 1 , 
or the New England Water 
Vorks Association at (508) 
893-7979. 
^Raymond J. Raposa 
Executive Director 
New England Water 
Works Association 

1 25 Hopping Brook Road 
Holliston 



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Quincy's 
Yesterdays 

Quincy Called 
Expendable As 
A-Bomb Target 

By PAUL HAROLD 

Members of the city council were somewhat startled when 
a federal civil defense spokesman advised them that the city 
was expendable as an atomic bomb 
target. 

Dr. Walter Cronin, Cambridge's 
civil defense director, said that the 
federal government would do noth- 
ing to aid the 83,000 residents of 
Quincy if it was hit with an atomic 
bomb because it would be too busy assisting defense instal- 
lations. "The citizens of Quincy and other east coast com- 
munities would have to take care of themselves," he said. 
The only federal assistance would be for the Fore River ship- 
yard and the Edison power plant in Weymouth. 

He further advised the council that Quincy was more vul- 
nerable as a target from a submarine launched rocket. "A 
submarine could surface off the coast of Provincetown and 
do a beautiful job on Quincy. It means tremendous devasta- 
tion here. They wouldn't need an atomic bomb," he said. 
$10,000 FOR WATER STUDY 
Oty Manager William Deegan successfully lobbied the 
city council for an appropriation of $10,000 for a study of 
the city's water system. It was the first such study in 24 years. 
Deegan pointed out the immediacy of the problem, with 
some areas of the city without any water for hours a day, 
while other suffered from low pressure. He said the MDC's 
new Blue Hills reservoir Would provide some relief, but only 
if the city's carrying capacity was increased. 
HOT-RODDERS WARNED 
Captain Joseph Flaherty, head of the Quincy Police traf- 
fic bureau, issued a warning to hot-rodders in the city: any 
misbehavior would result in the loss of license and registra- 
tion. 

Six operators with suped-up vehicles already had their 
licenses suspended. 

QUINCY-ISMS 
Health Commissioner Dr. Richard Ash called on the city 
to halt four summer nuisances: lack of water, dumps too close 
to residential neighborhoods, pollution in Quincy Bay and 
cesspools. . . Gunnar Myrbeck, president of the Jaycees, pre- 
sented the proceeds from gum machines to Police Chief Jo- 
seph Hughes for the Police Boys' Club. . . Councillor Frank 
Orcutt said he had an alibi for the time when a confidential 
memo was stolen from the city manager's desk. He was at 
Orchard Beach in Squantum. . .The Probus Club held its 
annual clambake at the Braintree Rod and Gun Club. Archie 
Cohen was chairman. . . There was a private funeral for Earl 
Pratt, president of the Neighborhood Club. . . Donald 
Edmonston, president of Local 5 at the Quincy shipyard, 
said the general membership meeting was cancelled because 
of the lack of a quorum. . . Gail Ann Bosworth, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bosworth of Small St., celebrated her 
third birthday. . . Edward Hanrahan of the Quincy Liquor 
Dealers said that Governor Paul Dever was invited to their 
annual clambake. . . Old Colony was the low bidder at 
$29,677 for the paving of the five new streets in the Snug 
Harbor section of Germantown. . . There were 19 candi- 
dates for state representative (for three seats) in the First 
Norfolk District. Republican Alfred Keith was the only in- 
cumbent. Other Republicans were Clifton Baker, George 
Yarrington, RoberrZottoll, Carter Lee, Joseph McDonough, 
Thomas Martin, Nicola Barbardoro, Joseph Goode, Thomas 
Burke, Edward Goode and Daniel Mullane. . . At the Mohigan 
Market watermelon was four cents a pound. . . At Quincy 
City Hospital as daughter was bom to Mr. and Mrs. Francis 
O'Hare of Channing St. A daughter was also bom to Mr. 
and Mrs. Victor Mariano of Lancaster St. . . Carl Awed and 
Irene Aristide were married at St. John's Church. . . One 
hundred trees in South and West Quincy were infected with 
the Dutch Elm disease. . . An additional $ 1 9,000 was appro- 
priated for the auditorium at the Squantum School. An esti- 
mated 150 residents of Rock Island crowded the city coun- 
cil chamber to protest the charges for sewer improvements 
in their area. Councillor David Crowley said they were be- 
ing charged betterment costs higher than for the same work 
in other parts of the city. . . Seat Scout Malcolm Bmmmitt 



was given the God and Country Award. 



Ih«e6 TlM Quiaioy Sun Thursday, July 27, 2000 



Storyteller Lauren Carson 
At Adams Shore Library 



Aerosmith Tribute Band 
Sunday On USS Salem 



The 14th season of the 
Summer Storytellers Series 
continues Tuesday, Aug. 1 
at 7 p.m. at the Adams 
Shore Branch Library, 519 
Sea St., with a performance 
by Lauren Carson. 

Carson will make her 
Ouincy debut with a pro- 
gram of Celtic tales and 
stories of the American 
South. At the same time, a 
Pajama Time Storyhour 
with Dottie Moynihan will 
be offered for younger sib- 
lings accompanied by an 
adult and families with chil- 
dren under the age of 5. 




LAUREN CARSON 

Marc Brown's. Marc 
Brown's Arthur will be the 



week's feature character. 

The six-week Summer 
Storytellers Series continues 
with Jennifer Smith Aug. 8 
and ends with Story- 
teller/Musician Scott Aug. 
15, Pajama Time with Dot- 
tie Moynihan will continue 
on these evenings with sto- 
ries from favorite authors 
such as Eric Carle. 

The programs are spon- 
sored by an LSTA grant 
from the Massachusetts 
Board of Library Commis- 
sioners and a Quincy Arts 
Lottery grant from the Mas- 
sachusetts Cultural Council. 



Ctiildren's Theatre In 
*Camp Chippewa Capers' 



Sunday's Summer Con- 
cert on the USS Salem has 
been changed and will now 
feature Draw The Line, the 
premier Aerosmith tribute 
band. 

Draw The Line replaces 
the band Platform Soul, 
which had originally been 
scheduled for the July 30 
date. 

As with all concerts in 
the series, show time is still 
2 p.m. to 4 p.m. 

Draw The Line is the 
only tribute band officially 
endorsed by the rock group 
Aerosmith. 




DRAW THE LINE 



Diane Purdy's Children's 
Theatre Workshop presents 
"Camp Chippewa Capers" 
Friday, July 28, at 7 p.m. at 
the Woodward School 



We need you. 



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AssodatioikJ 

WE'RE FIGHTING FOR YOUR LIFE 



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Theatre, 1102 Hancock St., 
Quincy Center. 

The play, written by 
Purdy, revolves around the 

camp councillors of "Camp 
Chippewa" trying to put on 
their end-of the-summer 
extravaganza amidst a host 
of difficulties. The play will 
be performed by children in 
Purdy's summer theatre 



camp, in keeping with the 
theater's motto of "drama 
by doing." 

Advanced ticket sales are 
$5, tickets for senior citi- 
zens and children under six 
are $6, and general door 
sales are $7. 

For more information or 
for reservations, call (617) 
472-9233. 



Guitarist Michael Nix At 
Crane Concert Series Aug. 3 




Guitarist Michael Nix 
brings his lively program 
Lutes and Limberjacks to 
the Thomas Crane Public 
Library, Quincy Square, 
Thursday, Aug. 3, from 
12:30 p.m. until 1:30 p.m. 

Lutes and Limberjacks is 
an interactive program using 
guitars, lutes, and banjos. It 
explores the sounds, history, 
uses, and construction of 
these instruments through 
song, instrumentals, and 
audience participation. The 
range of musical styles is 
intended for listeners of all 



ages. 

Nix has performed varied 
programs of classical guitar 
and lute music throughout 
the United States and Asia. 
He has appeared on televi- 
sion and public radio. Lutes 
and Limberjacks is a fea- 
tured piece of the Connecti- 
cut Classical Guitar Soci- 
ety's Andres Segovia out- 
reach program "The Guitar 
About Town." 

Nix, whose compositions 
have earned him awards and 
commissions, performs not 
only as a soloist but also as 
an ensemble member. 



The library 's concert 
series concludes Aug. 10 
when the ensemble INCA 
SON plays music of the 
Andes. 

Concertgoers are wel- 
come to bring lawn chairs, 
blankets, and picnics. In 
case of rain, concerts will be 
held at the Adams Shore 
Branch Library, 519 Sea St. 
Both sites are accessible and 
concerts are free. 

The series is funded in 
part by the Quincy Cultural 
Council, a .local agency 
supported by the Massachu- 
setts Cultural Cnnnrn 



McCole Watercolors Exhibit 
At Renaissance Coffee Shop 



A collection of original 
watercolor paintings by lo- 
cal artist Dan McCole will 
be on exhibit at Renaissance 
Coffee Shop, 45 Billings 
Rd., North Quincy, through 
Aug. 15, announces Renais- 
sance owner Kevin McGurl. 

The paintings range from 
portraits, boat scenes, land- 
scapes and still life, and 
span many years and areas. 
Local sites are represented, 
including Marin^ Bay, 
Squantum, South Boston, 
Neponset River and Dux- 
bury. Other scenes are from 
Provincetown, Truro, Dux- 
bury, South Boston, Ireland, 



Vermont, Paris and 
Giverny, France and Key 
West, Fla. 

The South Boston paint- 
ings are of subjects no 
longer in operation such as: 
the City Point Aquarium, 
the Head House, the raft at 
Kelly's Landing, the Strand 
movie theater and an old 
Boston elevated street car. 

McCole is a graduate of 
Vesper George School of 
Art. He has been in the 
newspaper business for 
most of his life, and is cur- 
rently a production news 
editor at the Boston Herald. 
A collection of his works 



are on permanent exhibition 
at the Crump Art Gallery in 
South Boston. 

The exhibit also shdws 
prints of available originals 
and recently sold paintings. 

McGurl has supported 
local arts and artists since ' 
the shop's opening last year. 
He comes from a family of 
artists. A huge 20-foot wide 
mural by his father Jim 
McGurl, depicting an old 
scene of coffee roasting 
ovens, covers one side of 

the shop's wall. The oppo- 
site wall is dedicated to art 
exhibitions. 



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Thursday, July 27, 2000 Tlkm Qulncy Sun Page 7 



Sec I At. 



72 On Woodward 
School Honor Roll 



The Woodward School 
announces that 72 students 
are on the honor roll for the 
fourth term. 

The students are: 
HIGH HONORS 

GRADE 6: Raraona 
Cavanaugh, Jillian Cuccia, 
Jessica Dubois, Jamie Har- 
ris, Nicole Lake, Christine 
O'Rourke, Stephanie 
Pietrafitta. 

GRADE:.?: Paula Dor- 
man, Jessica Lawlor, April 
Mochen, Christina Susi. 

GRADE 8: Raquel 
Manning, Alyson Pietrafitta, 
Emily Voigt. 

GRADE 9: Yana Dee, 
Erin Murphy, Michaela 
Plunkett. 

GRADE 10: Tricia Gor- 
don. 

GRADE 11: Angela 
Cefalu, Gbemi Sorinmade. 

GRADE 12: Melinda 
Palma, Angela Rugg. 
HONORS 

GRADE 6: Melissa Di- 
Paola, Alexa Latteo, Josie 
Madden, Natasha Ricci, 
Ashley Tagrin. 

GRADE 7: Danielle 
CoUetti, Laura Eastwick, 
Michael Rugg, Jessica 
Westgate. 

GRADE 8: Alyssa At- 
wood, Caitlin Barry, Elisa- 
beth Modestino, Kristina 



Pan. 

GRADE 9: Stephanie 
Giordano, Sara Glennon, 
Valerie Lampert, Pauline 
Law. 

GRADE 10: Julie 
D'Agostino, Chantelle Fre- 
chette, Stephanie Pierce. 

GRADE 11: Rizzi 
Blanza, Jennifer Cuneo, 
Caitlin Golden, Quinn Hur- 
ley, Kristen Tmdell. 

GRADE 12: Nicole 
Blatt, Jillian Broderick, 
Audrey Fergason, Cherytta 
Hogan, Lisa MacLennon- 
Cook, Jackie McKim. 
MERIT 

GRADE 6: Justine Fre- 
chette, Danielle Mylett, 
Ashley Pistorino. 

GRADE 7: Angela Fed- 
erico, Alda Koo. 



GRADE 8: Kerry Ber- 
gantino, Eliza Campbell, 
Christine Galvin, Donic 
Reid. 

GRADE 9: Mary Zoe 
Bucuvalas, Lauren Greene, 
Taneesha Wright. 

GRADE 10: Kathleen 
Hester, Rachel Jacobs, An- 
gela Moscato, Ashlie Riley. 

GRADE 11: Deborah 
Perkins. 

GRADE 12: Trista All- 
man, Sadia Mahmood. 




Pat Peers Installed 
Altrusa Club President 



Pat Peers was recently 
installed as president of the 
Altrusa International Club 
of Quincy for 2000-2001 at 
a ceremony at the Quincy 
Neighborhood Club. 

Also installed by Past 
President Sue Duggan were: 



Jean York, vice presi- 
dent; Mary Person, secre- 
tary; Marie Bogue, treas- 
urer; Frances Meade, past 
president; and Mary Moore, 
Margaret Shine and Sandra 
Jarvinen, Board of Direc- 
tors. 



Quincy Elks Host 
150 Seniors At Dinner Dance 



MR. and MRS. RICHARD E. FRAZEL 

Heather Macintosh Wed 
To Richard Frazel 



The Quincy Lodge of 
Elks entertained 150 senior 
citizens at a recent dinner 
dance and Exalted Ruler 
Terry Cullen told the seniors 
that the lodge plans more 
such parties in the coming 
months. 

City Council President 
Paul Harold and Tom 
Clasby, director of Quincy 
Elder Services, spoke to the 
seniors, whose ranks in- 
cluded former City Coun- 



cillor Ted DeChristofaro 
and his wife, Betty. 

The meal was catered by 
the lodge's caterer, 
"Barretts," and was served 
by members of the lodge 
and ladies of the Quincy 
Emblem Club. 

Dennis Kelly provided 
the music and Exalted Ruler 
Cullen was introduced by 
James Smith, the Elks sen- 
ior citizens chairman. 



Lucy Honig Receives 
Cultural Arts Award 



Lucy Honig of North 
Quincy has been chosen as 

one of 39 finalists in the 
Massachusetts Cultural 
Council's Arts Grants Pro- 
gram, a competition de- 
signed to recognize excep- 
tional artists and support 
their creative talent. 

Artist Grants finalists 
receive $1,000 awards. 

"These artists represent 
the best Massachusetts has 
to offer in the visual arts, 
dance and literature," said 



MCC Executive Director 
Mary Kelley. "These grants 
highlight our commitment 
to individual artists and their 
contributions to our thriving 
cultural community," 

Slide images of the 
works of the Artist Grant 
finalists and others will be 
shown at the MCC's Slide 
Showcase Saturday, June 
17. at Harvard's Arthur M. 
Sackler Museum, 485 
Broadway, Cambridge. 
Admission is free. 



Jane-Sarah MacFarlane 
Mass. College of Art Graduate 



Jane-Sarah MacFarlane 
recently graduated from 
Mass. College of Art. 

The daughter of Donald 
and Jane MacFarlane of 
Quincy, she graduated with 
Distinction and with De- 
partmental Honors. As a , 



film major, she intends to 

pursue her career in Inde- 
pendent Film Production. 
Her films have appeared in 
the Boston area. 

Miss MacFarlane is a 
graduate of North Quincy 
High School. 



Heather J. Macintosh of 
West Yarmouth and Richard 
E. Frazel of Centerville re- 
cently were married at the 
First Congregational Church 
in Yarmouthport. 

The new Mrs. Frazel is 
the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. David B. Macintosh 
Jr., of West Yarmouth and 
the granddaughter of David 
Macintosh of Quincy and 
the late Mrs. Macintosh. 

She is the great grand- 
daughter of David Mcin- 
tosh, a former mayor (1952- 
53) and city councilor of 
Quincy. 

Mr. Frazel is the son of 
Robert Frazel of Naples, 
Fla., and Corinne Savery of 
West Barnstable. 

The bride is a graduate of 
Dennis- Yarmouth Regional. 
High School and has a de- 
gree in psychology from 
Wheaton College and a 
master's degree with read- 
ing certification from Salem 
State College. 

Sheila Halloran 
On Dean's List 

Sheila Halloran of 
Quincy was named to the 
Dean's List at Assumption 
College, Worcester where 

she is a member of the class 
of 2003. 

She is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Hal- 
loran of Perkins St. 



She is a fourth grade 
teacher in Barnstable Public 
Schools. 

The bridegroom, a 
graduate of Barnstable High 
School, is an arborist em- 
ployed by Davey Tree Ex- 
perts in Falmouth. 

Lisa Macintosh of Ham- 
den, Conn., was her sister's 
maid of honor and a cousin, 
Allison Macintosh of Win- 
chester, was junior brides- 
maid. 

After a wedding trip to 
the Bahamas, Mr. and Mrs. 
Frazel will live in Sand- 
wich. 



Quincy High 1985 Class 
Reunion Aug. 26 



The Quincy High School 
Class of 1985 will hold its 
15th anniversary reunion 
Aug. 26 from 7 p.m. to 
midnight at the Summer 
House at Marina Bay. 



Tickets are $37.50 per 
person. For information, call 
Joe Ciardi at 617-472-2511 

or Karen Fames at 617-773- 
4394. 



Mr., Mrs. Peter Sferruzzas 
Parents Of Twin Daughters 



Twin girls, Taylor Ann 
and Alecia Marie, were bom 
to Christine and Peter 
Sferruzza of Weymouth 
June 26 at South Shore 
Hospital in South Wey- 
mouth. 

Alecia is the senior twin 



by one minute. 

Grandparents are John 
and Margaret Francis of 
Quincy and Joann Sferruzza 
of Carver. 



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Pages TlMQulaoySun Thunday, July 27, 2MM 







Clam Chowder 



It was a cool weekend at the cape when 
we visited our daughter Nancy, son-in-law 
Jed and family. We never took off our 
sweaters. 

After ordering clam chowder at a 
restaurant and complaining that "we just 
can't get a good cup of chowder these 
days," I decided to make my own the next 
day. 

It's a tried and true recipe (and so easy) 
which always works. I hope you will 
agree. 

Clam Chowder 
2-3 pounds steamers 
a container of minced fresh clams 

2 pints half & half (or cream) 

3 medium potatoes (diced) 

3 medium onions (cut in small pieces) 

1/2 stick butter 

salt and pepper to taste 

cook the chims until open, and chuck. 



Save and strain the liquid, that's the secret 
of the chowder. , 

In a large pot, meh the butter, saut6 the 
onions until clear. Add some of the clam 
juice and cook a bit more. Add the diced 
potatoes and more of the juice. Cook until 
the potatoes are tender, (not mushy). We 
cut the clams in pieces, but they can also 
be chopped in a blender. 

Add the clams, the extra minced, the 
rest of the juice and cook covered slowly 
until it comes to a boil. Add the cream or 
half and half slowly until it just about 
comes to a boil. Turn heat off and keep 
covered until ready to serve. 

This recipe is loaded with clams, 
something almost always missing when 
eaten out. It can also be kept refrigerated 
for about three days, (also be frozen) 

P.S. Even our little granddaughters, 
Hannah and Sophia and their cousin 
Lauren liked it! 



Bonnie Ford On Dean's List 

Bonnie J. Ford, daughter Quincy, was named to the ^^^ is a member of the 
of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Assumption College Spring Class of 2002 and is major- 
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Eagle Scout Honors For 
Troop 3's Vincent Bissanti 



Vincent Bissanti, a 
Weymoutli resident and 
member of Scout Troop 3 in 
Quincy, was recently pre- 
sented his Eagle Scout 
badge by Mayor James 
Sheets at the Torre Dei 
Passeri Social Club, Wash- 
ington St. 

Bissanti, age 18, earned 
his badge by constructing a 
three-story fire escape for a 
soon-to-open homeless 
shelter and furniture bank in 
Weymouth run by Friends 
of the Homeless of the 
South Shore. 

A Boston College High 
School graduate who will 
attend Penn State, Bissanti 
recruited his teammates 




VINCENT BISSANTI 



from the BC High football 
and rugby teams to com- 
plete the project, which was 
finished in November, 
Joseph Bissanti, Vin- 



cent's father and Troop 3 

Scoutmaster, said he was 
proud of his son's commit- 
ment, noting the fire escape 
was the result of three years 
of work and planning while 
Vincent still dedicated him- 
self to academics and ath- 
letics, 'it was quite a diffi- 
cult and involved task," Bis- 
santi said. 

Along with Sheets, a 
representative from Gover- 
nor Paul Cellucci's Office 
was also on hand for the 
ceremonies honoring Bis- 
santi. 

Scout Troop 3 of Quincy 
meets at St. Chrysostom's 
Episcopal Church in Wol- 
laston. 



Broadmeadows Students 
Win Stock Market Game 



Six students from 
Broadmeadows Middle 
School in Quincy have 
taken first place in The 
Boston Globe's fall Stock 
Market Game, a simulation 
of Wall Street trading con- 
ducted nationally by the 
Securities Industry Associa- 
tion and administered lo- 
cally by The Boston Globe. 

The students, seventh 
graders Melissa Lewis, 
Robert McKeever, Kevin 
Richardson, Alysia 
DiMuzio, Lorrie Oakes, and 
Kerri McAteer, won the 
competition by possessing 



the most equity in their port- playing the market so equi- 

folios at the end of the 10- tably, each member of the 

week trading period. Quincy team was awarded a 

To play the Stock Market $50 US Savings Bond. 
Game, students start out Offered during the fall 
with a hypothetical and spring semesters, the 
$100,000 and invest it in Stock Market Game is de- 
common stocks listed in the signed for classroom use to 
New York Stock Exchange help students understand 
(NYSE), the American economic concepts, the 
Stock Exchange (ASE) and stock market, and the costs 
the Nasdaq, and follow their and benefits involved in 
progress daily by reading economic decision-making. 
The Boston Globe. 

The successful Broad- Por more information 

meadows Middle School about Newspaper in Educa- 

team's hypothetical assets tion programs sponsored by 

increased by over 25 per- The Boston Globe, call 617- 

cent, totaling $125,378. For 929-2000. 



Susan McDonald Earns Honors 
At College Marketing Conference 



Susan McDonald of 
Quincy, vice president of 
programming for the 
Bridgewater State College 
Chapter of the American 
Marketing Association, was Williams High School. 



centration in marketing. 

The daughter of Jim 
McDonald and the late' Ellie 
McDonald, she is a 1995 
graduate of Archbishop 



part of the delegation fi-om 
BSC that brought home two 
major awards from the In- 
ternational Collegiate Con- 
ference of the AMA. 

McDonald, a senior at 
BSC, is majoring in man- 
agement science with a con- 



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the history of the BSC 
chapter. The delegation also 
received a first place award 
in the Exhibit Hall competi- 
tion. 

Students who attended 




THE BOARDWALK EVENT SERIES PRESENTS 
THE FIFTH ANNUAL 




ARTS MFFAIR 



ON THE BOARDWALK AT MARINA BAY 

AUGUST 5-6, 2000 - Qy INCY, MA 

Vtem over 300 works of art on cU^lay featuring artwork by members of nine 

k)cal ait i^sociations: Quincy, Milton, Braiittree, Canton, Weymouth, Rando^h, Hie 

Artists' Ciide of the Fuller Museum in Brockloa, Roslindak and West Roxbu^^ 

Also festtuied will be: 

A spedal eidiibtt of student artwork by the l(M>dward School for Gir^ 

Live Artist Demonstrations oaSat^lOam-Spm&Sim., lOam-Spm. 

Open niEE to the puMk with plenty of FREE parkfaigl 

Sponsored by: CUzeas Bonk, 11u)insoa &11iofiison, Boston I%m^ 

Siro's Restauiant, Peter & William O'a)nne0 & Marina Place Assisted Living 

In dK ewol of iadeniM wcMher, the exUM wtt be iMwd to die lobby 

acrOH Sfom ihe BoanhnHL 



The BSC chapter of the the three-day conference in 
AMA received the award New Orleans took park in a 
for Outstandmg Regional variety of learning and lead- 
Chapter in the East. This ership sessions on topics 
award, which honors out- such as advertising, Internet 
standing achievement dur- marketing and marketing 
mg the calendar year, marks ^search, 
the highest achievement in 

Kristen Kelley 
Assumption Graduate 

Kristen Alysse Kelley of from Assumption College in 
Quincy recently graduated Worcester. 

She received a Bachelor 

of Arts degree in Spanish 
and Spanish/Hispanic Cul- 
ture and Civilization. 

She is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. James Kelley 
ofVerchildSt. 



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City Council Approves 
Clubhouse'For Quarry Hills 



18 Residents On Fontbonne Honor Rolls 



The City Council has 
voted unanimously to ap- 
prove construction of a 
clubhouse at the Quarry 
Hills Recreation Complex in 
West Quincy. 



numerous submissions to state law mandated ADA 
the Quincy Fire Department compliance and that the 
regarding safety issues; and project was meeting its ob- 
installation of traffic control ligations, 
signals at the intersection of Ward 4 Councillor Mi- 
Willard St. and Copcland St. chael D'Amico emphasized 

Attorney Dennis Har- that every project begun 
Acting as the special rington, representing Quarry during his tenure was in 
P.U.D. permit granting Hills Associates, called the compliance with ADA and 

conditions "reasonable and 
necessary" and said his cli- 
ents were not in opposition. 

One resident, Denise 
Valenti of Forest Ave., 



authority July 17, the coun 
cil approved the 42,500 
square foot club- 
house/function hall, which 
also entails a driving range 
and a 414-space parking lot. 



remarked of the 27-hole golf 
course project in general 
that "we have seen every 
issue handled in the best 
possible way." 

The golf course, built 



The following 18 Quincy 
residents are on Fontbonne 
Academy's third and fourth 
quarter honor rolls. 

Third quarter honor 
roll includes: 

Prindpars List: Elaine 
Yiu, grade 12; Wendy Law, 
grade 10. 

First Honors: Maria 
Coughlin, grade 12, Chris- 
tina Cleary, grade 10; 
Maureen Maguire, grade 10; 
Caroline Maus, grade 10. 

Second Honors: Anne 



Hayes, grade 12; Ashley 
Dindial, grade 10; Chrystina 
Dolan, grade 10; Jessica 
Lisowski, grade 10; Kaitlin 
DeCilio, grade 9. 

Honorable Mention: 
Julie Ann Keane, grade 12; 
Jennifer Astrella, grade 10; 
Jessica Petkus, grade 10; 
Alegria Albarran, grade 9; 
Caitlin Foley, grade 9. 

Fourth Quarter honor 
roll includes: 

First Honors: Maria 
Coughlin, grade 12; Anne 



Hayes, grade 12; Elaine 
Yiu, grade 12; Christina 
Cleary, grade 10; Maureen 
Maguire, grade 10; Caroline 
Maus, grade 10. 

Second Honors: Chrys- 
tina Dolan, grade 10; Jessica 
Lisowski, grade 10, Jessica 
Petkus, grade 10, Alegria 
Albarran, grade 9, Kaitlin 
DeCilio, grade 9. 

Honorable Mention: 
Jennifer Astrella, grade 10; 
Emily Torres, grade 10, Lisa 
Zizza, grade 9. 



, spoke in opposition at the — o— , 

Ihe permit does come p^bij^. bearing and voiced over landfill and recently 

subject to a list of 24 condj- ^er concern that the project transported fill from the 

tions enumerated by the ^^^^^ J^^^ ^^^^^^y ^j^^ ^^^^ Cgnj^a, ^^^y p^^-^^^ ^gjg 

Quincy Planning Board, Americans with Disabilities Dig), is scheduled to open in 

which gave the clubhouse ^ct (ADA). "I want this to the spring of 2002. 

plan its affirmative recom- ^e on record, so that when The piece of property on 

there are non-compliance which the clubhouse, driv- 

issues, no one can say they ing range, and parking lot 

didn't know," Valenti said, will be built was zoned for 

Valenti was assured by P.U.D. use in June. The golf 

several representatives of course itself has been zoned 



mendation July 12 

Conditions include, 
among others: plans for 
waste disposal, a water de- 
tention area, and an insect 



and rodent control plan; q^^^ jjj,,^ Associates that Open Space. 

Debika Paul Named Collegiate Scholar 



The United States 
Achievement Academy an- 
nounces that Debika Paul of 
Quincy has been named an 
All-American Collegiate 
Scholar. 

The USAA has estab- 
lished the All-American 
Collegiate Award Program 
to offer deserved recogni- 
tion to superior students 
who excel in the academic 
disciplines. 

All-American Collegiate 
Scholars must earn a 3.3 or 



higher grade point average 
and must be selected by a 
school official or other 
qualified soonsor. Scholars 
are also eligible for other 
awards given by the USAA. 
Paul, who graduated 
from Emmanuel College, 
was nominated for the na- 



tional award by Sr. Patricia 
Johnson, Dean. 

Paul will appear in the 
All-American Collegiate 
Yearbook, which is pub- 
lished nationally. 

She is the daughter of 
Benoy Paul of Quincy. 





Catherine Jordan Graduates From Regis 



Catherine Jordan of 
Quincy recently graduated 
from Regis Colbj^e with a 



bachelor's degree in com- 
munication. 



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Page 10 Tl&e Qulncjy Sun Thursday, July 27, 2000 



18 Residents On UMass-Amherst Dean's List 



The University of Mas- 
sachusetts at Amherst an- 
nounces that 18 Quincy 
residents are on its Dean's 
List for the spring semester. 

Students are: 

Kevin Ann, Prospect St.; 
Gina Bermingham, Prospect 
Ave.; Andrea Healy, 



Barham Ave.; Phuong 
Huynh, Kendall St.; Paul 
Lutts, Presidents Lane; Ken 
Phu, Hamilton St.; Jin 
Quian, East Squantum St.; 
Amanda Rork, Holbrook 
Rd.; Kelly Scott, Haviland 
St., Katrina Skayne, Edge- 
water Drive; Lan Sze So, 



Glover Ave.; Li Wei Tang, 
Apthorp St. 

Misa Tang, Adams St.; 
Triet Truong, James St.; Soi 
Ha U, Holmes St.; Ra- 
doslaw Wierzbowski, Fur- 
nace Brook Parkway; Dan- 
iel Wong, Plymouth Ave; 
and Lai Ying Yu, Royal St. 



Beechwood Harbor Cruise 

To Help Repair Storm 

Damaged Playground 



Funds raised by the 
Beechwood Community 
Life Centre Boston Harbor 
Cruise, Wednesday, Aug. 2 
will go to helping repair the 



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center's pre-school play- 
ground which was heavily 
damaged by lightning in a 
recent storm. 

A lightning bolt struck 
the playground tower during 
the June 27 storm and it and 
torrential rains and heavy 
winds caused other heavy 
damage to the playground 
area. 

Sharron Beais, executive 
director, said the playground 
has been out of commission 
for four weeks. Repairs are 
now underway and insur- 
ance will cover a good part 
of the repair costs. But, 
Beals said, there is a $1,000 
deductible expense she 
hopes can be made up from 
revenue from the cruise. 

Originally, Beals said, 
the cruise was planned to 
raise monies Project SAFE, 
to purchase and install 
smoke alarms for senior 



citizens. 

Now, she said, repairing 
the pre-s school playground 
now has become the first 
priority. 

"We are optimistic that 
the cruise will be a great 
success so we can repair the 
playground and fulfill the 
identified senior needs as 
well," said Beechwood 
Board President Don 
Uvanitte. 

The three-hour harbor 
cruise aboard the James 
Doherty will leave Marina 
Bay at 7 p.m. Boarding will 
be at 6:30 p.m. 

Complimentary food and 
music by a DJ will be pro- 
vided .Cost is $35 per per- 
son or $50 per couple. Tick- 
ets can be purchased at the 
Beechwood Center, 440 
East Squantum St. Call 471- 
5712 for more information. 



Stephanie Sprague On 
Dean's List at Syracuse 

Stephanie Sprague of versity's College of Arts 

Quincy has been named to and Sciences, 
the dean's list for the spring She is a junior, majoring 

semester at Syracuse Uni- in political science. 




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Thunday, July 27, 2000 



P«fell 



Two Bankruptcy 
Before License 



By MARIE D'OLIMPIO 

Two matters involving 
bankruptcy proceedings 
came before the License 
Board at Tuesday's meeting. 

A motion to withdraw 
the all alcoholic license by 
Kelly's Pub & Restaurant, 
21-27 Billings Rd. was 
granted. 

The hearing will be con- 
tinued until Aug. 29. 

According to Chairman 
Joseph Shea, the restaurant 
has filed for bankruptcy and 
the license transfer has to be 
re-advertised and re- 
structured for the Alcoholic 
Beverage Control Commis- 
sion- (ABCC). 

In other business, the 
board placed on file the 
bankruptcy proceedings of 
Richard's Liquors on 302 



Quincy Ave. pending the 
outcome of the future sale. 

According to Atty. Tom 
Vangel, the owners of the 
company had filed Chapter 
11 late last year, but were 
unable to re-organize. 

Fire Chief Thomas Gor- 
man and Det. Lt. Robert M. 
Perchard reported that a 
break-in occurred recently 
at the liquor store. Both 
Gorman and Perchard said 
they had concerns about the 
future security of the build- 
ing. 

Gorman said the building 
was entered in through the 
rear of the store where ce- 
ment blocks were actually 
broken in pieces to gain 
entrance. He said the build- 
ing has since been secured 



Matters 
Board 

and bolted with plywood. 

Perchard said he was 
concerned about "kids try- 
ing to crawl down an ele- 
vator shaft" to gain access 

to the rest of the inventory 
still in the building. 

Vangel promised he 
would speak to the owners 
regarding the removal of the 
inventory or to place it in 
storage. 

The bankruptcy meeting 
caused Shea to utter, "July 
seems to be bankruptcy 
month in Quincy, lets wel- 
come August." 



Pappas At Summerfest Aug. 2 



The Quincy Summerfest 
continues its concert season 
with popular jazz vocalist 
Kris Pappas Wednesday, 
Aug. 2, from 7 p.m. to 9 
p.m. at the Ruth Gordon 
Amphitheater. 

Pappas will be perform- 
ing this afternoon 



(Thursday) on the lawn of 
the Thomas Crane Library 
for those wishing a preview 
of her Aug. 2 performance. 

The remaining schedule 
includes: Soul Kitchen, 
Aug. 9; Horns in the House, 
Aug. 16; Magic, Aug. 23; 
The Alumni Band, Aug. 30; 



and The United States Air 
Force Band, Sept. 6. 

Sponsored by the non- 
profit Quincy South Shore 
Cultural Commission and 
the City of Quincy, Sum- 
merfest 2000 relies on pri- 
vate and public donations to 
finance the concerts. 





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10 Residents Receive Second 
Term Honors At Thayer 



Ten students from 
Quincy have been accorded 
academic honors for the 
second semester at Thayer 
Academy in Braintree. 

High honors went to 
Johnice Rebecca Graham, 
daughter of John Graham 
and Mary Weafer; William 
C. Harding, son of the Rev. 
and Mrs. William C. Hard- 
ing III; Melissa A. Zine, 
daughter of Paul A. Zine. 

Honors were achieved by 
Kerry A. Whelan. daughter 



of Mr. and Mrs. William J. 
Whelan; Alana Casciello, 
daughter of Louis Casciello 
and Mary Bellrose; Chris- 
tina L. Philips, daughter of 
Diane Philips; Kacy Cera- 
soli, daughter of Mr. and 

Mrs. Robert Cerasoli; Matt 
Daylor, son of Rosalie 
Cryan; Michael Huen-Wo 
Tsang, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Peter M. Tsang; Tiffany 
Michelle Wan, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Johnny Wan. 



Erin DriscoU On 
Curry Dean's List 



Erin DriscoU of Squan- 
tum was named to the 
dean's list of Curry College 
in Milton for both the fall 
and spring semesters. 

DriscoU, a graduate of 
North Quincy High School, 



is a freshman at the school. 

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Page 12 Tbe Qv&inosr Sun Thursday, July 27, 2000 



Bethany Church 
2000-Pound 

Gargoyle Must 
Be Removed 



(Cont'd From Page 1) 
the comer of the steeple, and 
it's actually the massive 
weight of the tower that 
holds the gargoyle in place. 
It will take a lot of time and 
ingenuity to put this thing 
back together." 

The first step, 
Pasqualucci said, will be for 
an on-site crane to place 
slings around the gargoyle, 
providing enough stability 
for workers on man-lifts to 
cut off the exposed portion 
of the gargoyle, leaving the 
inside backing alone. 

After that, workers will 
hoist scaffolding and remove 
enough of the steeple comer 
to get at the two-foot deep 
gargoyle backing. 

Both the interior and ex- 
terior pieces, Pasqualucci 
said, will be molded and re- 
cast as one complete piece, 



then restored to its place on 
the tower. 

"It's too dangerous to be- 
gin with scaffolding," 
Pasqualucci added. "At 2000 
pounds, it (the gargoyle) 
could easily rip any scaffold- 
ing down." 

Similar molding and re- 
casting, Pasqualucci said, 
were under way for the cor- 
ner pinnacle and several 
smaller pinnacles which 
were destroyed last week. 

And it's this molding and 
recasting, along with the 
decorative and ornamental 
nature of the entire restora- 
tion project, which will add 
considerable amounts of 
time to the project. 

"By the time we're ready 
to put everything back in 
place, it will be winter and 
we'll have to stop," 
Pasqualucci said. 




THIS PHOTO shows a detailed look at one of the Bethany 
Congregational Church pinnades. 

(Quincy Sun Photos/Robert Bosworth) 



AND HERE'S a loolc at where the pinnacle destroyed by light- 
ning once stood. Rope from the tower is loosely tied to a dam- 
aged gargoyle which will have to be removed and replaced. 




ROBERT PASQUALUCCI (left) of Louis Pasqualucci & Son, Inc., general contractor, and Rick 
McCarthy, foreman, survey the damage to the Bethany Congregational Church steeple Mon- 
day in an aerial platform operated by Tom Azar of Marr Scaffolding Co. in South Boston. The 
inspection took place 120 feet up. 



BECAUSE OF A crack, this 2000-pound gargoyle will be removed from the tower of Bethany 
Congregational Church this week. The crack is noticeable near the base of the gargoyle. Con- 
tractors say removing and replacing the gargoyle will be a delicate procedure. 




TOP OF HIE Bcttany Congregatkmal Church Tower dami^ed by lightning July 18. Damaged 
gargoyk and wftme» where miwim pinnacle stood are in the foreground. 



REPAIRED ROOF at Bethany Congregational Church after it was damaged by a concrete 
pinnacle struck by lightning. Part of the pinnacle (center shown above) remains mi the roof. The 
pinnacle fell about 80 feet and went through the classroom of the Montessori School for Early 
Learning. There were no injuries. 



mmmm 



mKmmimm^7m».mf 



■■ 



Thttndjiy, July 27, 2000 



P»gel3 



O'Brien Delivers $14,000, 
Promises $1.2M Extra 



(Cont'd from Page 1) 
message of proper manage- 
ment at the state level. 

"It goes far beyond the 
dollar figure," said the 
mayor. "$14,000 is $14,000 
that we can use and we'll 
put it to good use, but, more 
importantly, it shows the 
Treasurer's Office is doing 
the job that needs to be 
done." 

The return of the funds 
owed Quincy illustrates a 
new priority for the Office 
of the Treasurer under 
O'Brien's leadership: the 
continuing effort to return 
tens of millions of dollars in 
abandoned property to its 
owners. 

"The old philosophy was 
essentially to put it in the 
state coffers," O'Brien said, 
explaining that, although the 
practice made good eco- 
nomic sense for the state, it 
was an invisible tax placed 
not just on individuals but 
on workplaces and on cities 
like Quincy. 

"It's your money and 
we're trying to make sure 
you get what's yours," 
O'Brien said, adding that 
over $60,000 had been re- 
turned to South Shore com- 
munities and over $350,000 
had been returned across 
Massachusetts. 

Much of the money owed 
Quincy was turned over to 
the Treasurer's Office dur- 
ing the 1990's, but some 
was turned over as early as 
1980. 

The $14,000 is actually 
the second parcel of aban- 
doned property returned to 
the city this calendar year. 
Several month ago, records 
detailing $3,459.25 of aban- 
doned property that the state 
was holding for Quincy 
Hospital and the police de- 
partment were conveyed to 
local officials by O'Brien's 
office. 

After the installation of a 
new computer system and 
the consolidation of the 
abandoned property data- 
base, the Treasurer's Office 




Laura Shea On Dean's List 

Laura Shea, daughter of ^** named to the Assump- A member of the Qass 
Mr. and Mrs. Leo P. Shea of ^'O" College Spring 2000 of 2001, she is majoring in 
East Elm Ave., WoUaston, Dean's List. Spanish. 



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FOUND MONEY: State Treasurer Shannon O'Brien hands 
Mayor James Sheets an application for the $14,932 owed 
Quincy in abandoned property. O'Brien's office is making 
the return of abandoned property a top priority and has 
already returned nearly $350,000 statewide. 

(Presidential Camera Photo/Daniel Cannon) 

located the additional www.state.ma.us/treasury. 

Quincy properties. After the Individuals may also call 

latest property is returned, O'Brien's Abandoned Prop- 

the Treasury will have con- erty Division at (617) 367- 

veyed a total of $17,791.92 0400, Monday through Fri- 

in abandoned properties to day, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., to ac- 

the city. cess this year's list, make a 

,, , . claim, or search the more 

Abandoned property can 

be anything from Certifi- than two million records in 
cates of Deposit and pass- the Treasury's abandoned 
book savings accounts to property database, 
stocks and uncashed divi- 
dends. Under Massachusetts 
Abandoned Property Law, 
assets that have been inac- 
tive for more than three 
years (with a few excep- 
tions) are declared aban- 
doned and turned over to the 
state Treasury. 

Before she left, O'Brien 
leff copies of this year's 
abandoned property list at 
City Hall. The list contains 
more than 20,000 names, 
including 1,114 names from 
the South Shore, with a total 
value of $50 million. 

The 2000 and 1999 
abandoned property lists are 
available on the Internet at 



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1422 Hancock St«et Mon^-SiJ.^ 7:30. 

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WOMEN S HEALTH TAMf at , hj^^H SHORE HOSPIlAi 



The regions leaders 

in women's health care 
are in your region 

Whether you're thinking about having a baby, approaching 
mid-life, or well into your senior years, here's great news: 
Physicians and midwives affiliated with South Shore Hospital — 
the region's number one choice for women's health care -^ 
have offices nearby. 

So if you're planning for a new phase of your life or just looking 
for a change, call us today. 

Call 1-800-325-5454 or visit 

www.80uth8hOi^ho8pital.org for a referral 

or for a list of women's health care providers. 



South Shore 
Hospital 




55 Foqg Ho.id M Roufr 1. 



(i \V( vi'ivuih. :.:a 



Page 14 



Thursday, July 27, 2000 




FHA Programs Help First-Timers Buy Their 'Dream Home' 



By CAROL BULM AN, 

President 
Conway Financial Services 

In a recent report, an offi- 
cial of the U.S. Department 
of Housing and Urban De- 
velopment presented an im- 
pressive picture of the turn- 
around of the Federal Hous- 
ing Administration's mort- 
gage loan programs. 

"raA is one of the fed- 
eral government's real suc- 
cess stories," said Assistant 
Secretary for Housing Will- 
iam Apgar. " Since 1934, 
FHA has helped nearly 30 
million American families to 
become homeowners. We do 
this by insuring home mort- 
gages, providing valuable 
credit enhancement that en- 
courages private lenders to 
make home loans they other- 
wise would deem too risky." 

The program has been 
largely successful, but about 
1 years ago it was in finan- 



cial decline. 

"Despite a six-decade his- 
tory of providing access to 
mortgage capital — in good 
times and in bad — by the 
early 1990s, the FHA was 
broke," Apgar said. "Yet, 
after radical restructuring 
under the leadership of Sec- 
retary Andrew Cuomo, the 
program is projected to con- 
tribute nearly $20 billion to 
the national budget surplus." 

The FHA was created by 
the National Housing Act of 
1 934, which was designed to 
help the real estate market 
recover from the Great De- 
pression. It did this by estab- 
lishing a federally sponsored 
insurance fund to provide a 
safety net in case a loan went 
into default. This allowed 
customers with less than a 20 
percent downpay ment to pur- 
chase a home. 

Since that time, the FHA 
has provided the framework 




CAROL BULMAN 

for a true national mortgage 
market that led to the cre- 
ation of the Federal National 
Mortgage Associatioh 
(Fannie Mae) and the Fed- 
eral Home Loan Mortgage 
Association (Freddie Mac). 



downpayment and closing 
costs. With the FHA, as long 
as the buyers qualify for the 
monthly payment, the re- 
quired investment may come 
from a gift from a relative or 
a grant from a public agency. 
FHA reports that so far 
this year, 82 percent of all 
loans insured by the agency 
were for first-time buyers. 
Some of that success can be 
attributed to the increase in 
the FHA's maximum loan 



limits that occurred earlier in 
the year. 

Buyers in Massachusetts 
can now borrow up to 
$2 1 8,500 for a single-family 
home in Bristol, Plymouth, 
Suffolk, Norfolk, Essex, 
Middlesex and Worcester 
counties. The limits for multi- 
family homes are $246,0(X) 
for a two-family house, 
$299,000 for three-families, 
and $345,000 for four-unit 
properties. 



During the past several 
years, the FHA program has 
acted more Hke a privately 
run firm in the way the agency 
has balanced budgets, cut 
waste and fine-tuned and 
added products. 

The FHA iMX)gram's suc- 
cess benefits all U.S. citizens 
not only because of the ex- 
panded housing opportuni- 
ties, but also from the 
agency's financial contribu- 
tion to our economy. 



South Shore Association of Realtors 
MAR Charity 2000 Fundraiser Aug. 10 



The South Shore Asso- 
ciation of Realtors® Realtor 
Community Service Com- 
These two agencies form the niittee in conjunction with 
secondary mortgage market the Massachusetts Associa- 




by purchasing loans from 
lenders, freeing up cash for 
the banks to make more loans. 
FHA's three-percent 
downpayment and flexible 
qualifying standards set it 
apart from most conventional 
loans, but its special edge is 
that it allows 100 percent of 
all monies in the transaction 
to come from a gift. Many 
first-time buyers today have 
difficulty raising the neces- 
sary money for a 



l/fN MOSCAMHU 

uemiBORHOOo 
mfmtwAL TO ami 



L 



Bu^'mq, Selling or Investing? 

Call Tom McFarland 

For AH Your 
Real Estate Answers 

QUINCY 328-3200 



tion of Realtors® will hold a 
Charity 2000 Night Thurs- 
day, Aug. 10 at the Furnace 
Brook Country Club, 74 
Summit Ave., Quincy. 

The South Shore Asso- 
ciation of Realtors® has cho- 
sen the Brockton Coalition 
for the Homeless, Inc., 
MainSpring House as the re- 
cipient. Raffle tickets are on 
sale now through the South 
Shore Association of Real- 
tors® at $100 each. Only 300 invading outdoor living 

space, but even the best 



tickets will be sold. 

A grand prize of $5,000 
will be given in addition to 
other cash prizes. The win- 
ner does not have to be 
present at the drawing Aug. 
10 to win. 

The mission of the 
Brockton Coalition for the 
Homeless is to end 
homelessness through pro- 
viding emergency shelter, 
education, job training, case 
management, housing search 



assistance and other support 
services. 

By supporting South 
Shore Association's Charity 
2000 Fundraiser, the 
Brockton Coalition for the 
Homeless will be assisted in 
its tireless efforts to accom- 
plish their mission. 

For more information on 
the sale of raffle tickets, con- 
tact the South Shore Asso- 
ciation of Realtors® Board 
Office at 781-849-6700. 




STAMOS & STAMOS 

747 East Squantum Street, 
Squantum, MA 02171 



fe] (617)328-9400 



A GREAT COMPANY TO DO BUSINESS WITH 



Pet-Resistant Insect Screening 

Screens are an excellent Phifer PetScreen® is 

way to keep insect pests from .^even tjmes stronger than 

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screens can't protect you with dogs and cats and high- 
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A new generation of 
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jumping on screen doors and 
porches. 



strong vinyl-coated polyes- 
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For a free brochure, call 
1-800-874-3007. 



Grace Eng HELP WANTED Carol Cahill 



We need listings... 
Give one of us a call! 

Full time openings available 

for experienced agents 

Call for an interview. 

Conway 

^ REALTOR* -^ 



JACK CONWAY 
COMPANY, INC.™ 

Lynne Houghton, Manager 
Free Market Analysis 

253 Beale Street, Quincy 
617-479-1500 



Sandra Frnnelly Bever y Joyce Ernie Light 



■CENTURY 21 

ANNEX REALTY, INC. 

49 BEALE STREET, QUINCY, MA 
472-4330 1-800-345-4614 

Across from Blockbuster & Quincy T 




QUINCY 

Say "hello" to a good buy! 6 room bungalow in super 
condition located on a quiet side street close to Furnace 
Brook. You've hit the jackpot here. $210,000 




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See all our listings at: wwM'.c21annex.coni 



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or visit www.Afinehome.com 



List Your Residential 

& Commercial 

Properties with 

COLLEEN RUSSO 

Realtor/Broker 




Full-Time Professional 
Real Estate Services 

MobiUVoice Mail (617) 842-8065 

Office (617) 328-3200 
Web site: Colleenrusso.realtorxom 
Your home listed 
on the internet! 



REALTY PROS 




Flavin & Flavin 
Real Estate 




Buying or Selling? 
Let me help you! 

6I7'479'1000 



Thursday, July 27, 2000 Tli* Quii&oy Sum Page 15 



Catch These Opportunities Whiie X 

South Slmre Homes & Investment Properties 





I OPEN HOUSE 

Quincy - 

Centre Street West Condo Complex... 1st unit 

available since 1996! Tri-lcvel townhouse, 6 

rcH)ms, 2 bcdr(X)tns, 1 1/2 baths, private yard, 

customized interior with fine wcxxlwork & marble 

fireplace, tile fl(X)rs in kitchen & bath, short walk 

to train. 

$233,000... Call Kam Lee 

Open House: Saturday & Sunday, 1-3 pm 

215 Centre Street, West Quincy 



Quincy - 

2-family home, great income 
property, newer windows and 
furnace. 18-20 Moore St. 
$289,900... Call Kelle Sutliff 





Weymouth «• 

2-faflTlly in a great legation, needing 
a little TLC, but worth the invest- 
ment! 14 Sea St., $194,900... 
Call Kelle Sutliff 




Weymouth - 

Single family home with 2 bed- 
rooms, hardwood floors, kitchen 
with sliders onto deck that over- 
looks the lake, 1 -car garage under. 
$179,900... Call Kelle Sutliff 



^ft}' X- ■■:mii^'i'< m ^^^isK-.;-,-; *4-y'. .f ■:»> ,- ^ti-. ^'Se^s?; >:.ii-mir "tv:(f »* 



0S "m 





".^ivm'mi'r^mfirKi <• 



Quincy - 

Live in a condo that feels like a 
home! Town house style, 4 rooms, 2 
bedrooms, eat-in kitchen, 1 1/2 
baths, private deck, separate - 
entrance garage, low fees, small 
animals accepted. 12 Fallon Ct. 
$179,900... Call Kelle Sutliff 




Weymouth ' 



. ,/ Looking for a money maker? 

*^'^ 4-family home within walking 

-^ distance to the T. 28 Pond St. 

--S $299,900... Call Kelle Sutliff 



Office, Retail & Flex Space More ooice space.. . 



uBMLmBtmat 





»i*W1»S!«. 



Great Weymouth Location 

• Approx. 20,000 SF of space 

• Former nursing home facility 
IcKated on a 29,370 SF site 

• Directly across from South Shore 
Hospital 

• Easy access to expressways 

• Ample parking 

• Call for lease terms 



Attractive Office/ 
Warehouse Building 

• Two-story facility 

• Approximately 2,450 SF of 
office space; outstanding 
upkeep 

• l,250sf attached warehouse 

• Easily accessible location 
close to highway 

• Parking available 



Quincy - 1,500 SF of 2nd fl. office space, 2,000 SF basement space. $16/SF 

Quincy - 5,000 SF office building, high visibility along Hancock St. $399,000 

Quincy - Two-story office/daycarc building. $550,000 

Quincy - 2,200 SF of office space, on-site parking. $ 1 5/SF gross or $2,750/mo. 

Quincy - Office space used as recording studio, 5,345 SF, completely renovated. 
Business B zoned. $325,000 

Braintree - New office, 365 SF. $550/mo. gross 

Canton - 3,700 SF of office space, on-site parking, minutes to Rte. 128. $ 1 5/SF 

Dorchester - Renovated mill building, exposed brick (Si wood beams, 1,000 SF 
available. $1 5/SF 

Dorchester - New office space, 1,875 SF on 2nd fl., 1,875 SF on 3rd fl., new 
construction, open floor plan. $20/SF 

Hingham - Office condo with 1,243 SF of space, ample on-site parking. $1 7/SF 

Hingham - Two units, 2,419 SF & 5,906 SF, outstanding image building, ample 
parking. $22/SF + light (Si plug 



BiCS-;-'.^r/:tS-: 







Design Your Own Spacie in this New Quincy Development 

• Up to 19,000 SF of new Class A build-to-suit office/retail space for lease 

• Outstanding traffic counts... peak hr. traffic flow in excess of 2,000 vehicles 

• Established retail neighborhcK>d features several major retailers, 
including Walmart, Roche Brothers, Bradlees and Walgreens 

• Qmvenient access by car or public transpt)rtatit)n, ample parking available 



Call 617-479-9000 

For More information 




Daniel J. 

nn & €o^ Inc. 

Visit These & Other Great Listings at www.djfiynn.com 



Commercial Sales & Leasing • Residential Home Sales 

Real Estate Auctions • Property Management 

32 Chestnut Street • Quincy • MA • 02169 

Tel. 617.479.9000 • Fax 617.770.0443 



»IHW HlB»««" 



Page 16 Tlie Qttincy SxMXk. Thursday, July 27, 2000 




Life-Saving CPR Training Is For All People 



At least once during your lifetime you probably will 



My Patients Speak For Themselves... 



"I hesitated to tiave surgery for intense peHn in my elbow, 
instead I had six acupuncture treatments with Dan Karp. 
The pain is totally gone and I play tennis regularly. No 
surgery and total relief. " - Moe Rubin, Brockton, MA 

• Stop Smoking • Weight Loss • Pain & Stress • Injury 

Some Insurances Accepted 

acudan.baweb.com 



DANIEL S. KARP, LIC. AC. 

A^ 1 2 DIMMOCK STREET, QUINCY 



(617)471-5577 

Monday-Friday 9am-6pm 



L/T». (^nrlstlne |— |uber 
\^r\\vopvacioT 

You've heard how good Chiropractic care is for you. 
Discover for yourself just how good you can feel. 

1250 Hancock Street, Quincy 

at Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates 
(617) 774-0595 or (617) 774-0611 

Provider for:. Harvard Pilgrim, 1\ifts, Blue 

Cross, Neighborhood Health, Medicare, 

Mass Health, Motor Vehicle, 

Worker's Compensation and others. 



witness someone having a 
heart attack or other near- 
fatal injury or sudden illness. 

There may also be a good 
chance that the person will 
die without cardiopulmonary 
resuscitation (CPR) — the 
lifesaving act of supplying 
oxygen to the brain and vital 
organs of a person whose 
heart has stopped pumping. 

In this country last year, 
325,000 people died who 
might otherwise have lived 
if someone nearby had been 
trained in CPR. A person's 
chance of surviving a severe 
heart attack without CPR is 1 
in 20. With CPR, the chance 
of survival increases to 1 in 



4. And CPR started by a by- 
stander doubles the likeli- 
hood of survival for victims 
of cardiac arrest (when the 
heart actually stops beating). 

CPR training is by no 
means an' adults-only issue: 
Teenagers and young adults 
in particular should have CPR 
skills as they participate in 
outdoor activities, sports, and 
social and work activities. 
Young people, after all, are 
on the front lines in restau- 
rants, stores, recreational ac- 
tivities and other public 
places. 

In fact, 15 states mandate 
CPR training, first aid train- 
ing, or both in their high 



school curricula. Massachu- 
setts is not one of them. The 
Bay State does have a cur- 
riculum guideline that high 
school students be trained in 
first aid and CPR, but so far 
only four school districts — 
Algonquin, Quabbin, 
Sharon, Wachusett — in- 
clude such training in their 
health classes. 

"There's clearly a payoff 
in learning a lifesaving pro- 
cedure such as CPR," says 
Worcester-area physician 
Thomas L. Rosenfield, M.D., 
who is leading a Massachu- 
setts Medical Society initia- 
tive to establish CPR train- 
ing in the state' s high schools. 



Swimmer's Ear Season 



As the heat increases, so 
will the time your child 
spends in the water. Swim- 



Smoking. 



American Heart 
AssociationJ 



« 



ming, camp water sports, and 
sprinklers can cause 
swimmer's ear. 

According to Harvard 
Vanguard pediatrician Dr. 
James Cooley, swimmer's 
ear, which is different from a 
middle ear infection, is an 
inflammation ofthe outer ear 
canal irritated by water that 
stays in the ear too long. 

Here are some tips to help 



you cope with the condition: 

• For ear pain that lasts 
more than two or three days, 
your child should see a doc- 
tor. 

• For swimmer's ear, the 
usual remedy is a prescrip- 
tion eardrop, though, in most 
cases, the infection will even- 
tually go away on its own. 

• A child with swimmer's 
ear shouldn't swim for 2-3 



He says that every high 
school student should have 
an opportunity to be trained 
and certified in basic CPR. 

"They are the future lead- 
ers of our communities," he 
says. "What better example 
of community involvement 
and concern for others can 
there be than helping some- 
one in serious trouble by prac- 
ticing something you can 
learn in about an hour?" 

CPR is relatively easy to 
master, and many organiza- 
tions in Massachusetts, such 
as the Red Cross and the 
American Heart Association 
offer lessons. 



days. 

• When back in the water, 
make sure they dry their ears 
after each swim. 

• If your child feels water 
in the ear, have them tilt their 
head and jump up and down 
to release the pressure. 

• If you have any ques- 
tions about ear pain, you 
should contact your physi- 
cian. 




Manet 
Community 
Health Center, Inc 

Est.1979 

Providing Family Practice 
primary health care for all ages 
for the insured and the uninsured 

Medical, Lab, Nutrition, Smoking and HIV Services 

Accredited by At 

Houghs Neck 
Snug Harbor 
North Quincy 
JoM Commissimi Hull Medical 

on AccmUtntksn at Hailthcan Organizations 




Red Cross Courses Here 



The American Red Cross 
will offer the following 
courses at its Quincy office, 
1495 Hancock St., in Au- 
gust. 

• Community First Aid & 
Safety - Tuesday, Aug. 1 , 8, 
15, 6 to 10 p.m. Students 
successfully completing this 
course will receive a com- 
munity CPR certificate valid 
for one year and a commu- 
nity First Aid & Safety cer- 



tificate valid for three years; 
cost $70. 

• Community CPR - Aug. 
1 and 8, 6 to 10 p.m. This 
course teaches rescue breath- 
ing, first aid for choking and 
CPR for adults, children & 
infants. Cost $52. 

• Adult CPR - Monday, 
Aug. 7, 6 to 10 p.m. Course 
teaches breathing, first aid 
|pr choking and CPR for vic- 
tims over eight years of age. 



Did You Know? 



A new series of work- 
books and readers, called 
Jump Start, may help parents 
get a j^p on things wlicai »t 
k>mes to engaging and mo^- 



vating children to learn. 

For more informanoh, 
visit Scholastic are 
www.scholastic.com. 



Cost $30. 

• Adult CPR Review - 
Wednesday, Aug. 9, 6 to 10 
p.m. Pre-requisite: current 
certification in Adult CPR. 
Cost $30. 

• Infant & Child CPR - 
Aug. 10 and 17, 6 to 10 p.m. 
The course covers rescue 
breathing, choking & CPR 
forchildren under eight years 
of age. Cost $47. 

• Infant and Child CPR 
Review — Monday, Aug. 14, 
6 to 10 p.m. Pre-requisite: 
current certification in infant 
& child CPR. Cost $33. 

Pre-registration is re- 
quired for all courses. Call 
(617) 770-2600, Monday 
through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m. 



Elizabeth Griffey, M.D. 

announces new. convenient Tuesday evening 
and Saturday summer hours. 

Board Certified in General Surgery 

Specialty Services in Breast Surgery and Nutrition Support 

New Patients Welcome 

Office Location 
500 Congress Street, Suite 2A . 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Phone: 617-472-2255 Fax: 617-427-3896 



Quincy Medical Center 
South Shore Hospital 



Carney Hospital 
Milton Hospital 



Children 
Teens 



ROBERT AZRAK, Ed.D. 

Licensed Psychologist 
Mass Bay Counseling, 36 Weston Ave., Quincy 

(617) 786-0137 



Adults 
Families 



www.psyrca.com 



COmPinE FAMHY HEALTH CARE SERVKES 

• Treatment of Colds, Plus, etc. 

• Annual Physical Examinations 

• Minor Emergenqf Care 

• Immunlzatlon/Pre-HHarital Testing 

• Preventive Health Screening 

• Occupational Health Services 



South Shore Health Center /, / , r 

759 Granite St , Braintree. MA02184 h/min / /m/.j - 

(781)848-1950 ""'■' ('"'mull':,.,!, 

DAVID S EGILMAN. MD. MPH. MEDICAL DIRECTOR 




Thursday, July 27, 2000 TH«Qulnoy8un Page 17 



Local 88 I\innel 

Workers Dedicate 

New Union Hall 



Tunnel Workers Local 
i8, a Local of the Laborers' 
[nternationai Union of 
Vorth America, recently 
Jedicated their newly reno- 
/ated union hall on Wash- 
ington St. 

The project was com- 
Dleted entirely with the help 
Df union members who 
.vorked for months refur- 
jishing the old yogurt fac- 
ory into a state-of-the-art 
neeting hall and office fa- 
;ility. 

In keeping with Quincy's 
listory as "The City of 
Presidents," Local 88 named 
heir meeting hall 
'Presidents Hall" in honor 
3f all past presidents of the 
International Union. 

On hand for the dedica- 
ion ceremonies were: 
vlayor James Sheets; City 
Council President Paul Har- 
)ld; City Councillors Daniel 
laymondi and Tim Cahill; 
Jtate Senator Michael Mor- 
issey; and State Rep. 
.Donald Mariano. 

Also participating in the 
ibbon cutting were a num- 
ber of officials representing 
:ounty government and the 
Massachusetts chapters of 
the AFL/CIO and Massa- 

DanielDoian 
On Mock Trial Team 

Daniel M. Dolan of schools and middle schools. 

3uincy, a senior at Boston ^ estimated 3,300 students 

College High School, has ^^^ ^^^ volunteer attorneys 

learned what it is like to be ^"^ J"**g^s took part in the 



chusetts Building Trades. 
David Grafton represented 
the U.S. Department of La- 
bor - OSHA. District offi- 
cers of the union were on 
hand to tour the hall and 
note the theme of laborers' 
Training and Safety pro- 
grams prominently dis- 
played throughout the facil- 
ity. 

Armand Sabitoni, vice 
president and regional man- 
ager of the Laborers' Inter- 
national Union, spoke to the 
officers and members of the 
Local after the invocation 
given by Father Edward 
Boyle of the Massachusetts 
Labor Guild. 

Scott Boidi, business 
manager of the Local, rec- 
ognized the "time, effort, 
and toil contributed by 
every member of the Local 
throughout the years which 
helped to finally make this 
home a reality for the mem- 
bers." 

Boidi cited the Local's 
ability to now run "more 
training programs, work on 
political action campaigns, 
and reach out to the greater 
community to spread the 
word about unions and col- 
lective action." 




TUNNEL WORKERS Local 88 recently dedicated their new 
union hall on Washington St. Attending the ribbon cutting 
ceremonies were, from left: Barry O'Brien, president, 
Tunnel Workers Local 88; Joseph Pavone, business agent, 
Mass Laborers District Council; City Council President Paul 
Harold; James Merloni Jr., president. Mass Laborers 
District Council; Paul McNally, business manager, Mass 



Laborers District Council; Mayor James Sheets; Armand 
Sabitoni, vice president and regional manager of the 
Laborers' International Union; Scott Boidi, business 
manager. Tunnel Workers Local 88; State Rep. Ronald 
Mariano; City Coundllor Tim Cahill; State Sen. Michael 
Morrissey; and Dominic Mazzeo, secretary treasurer. 
Tunnel Workers Local 88. (Quincy Sun Photo) 



Robert Walsh Army 
Course Graduate 

Army Pvt. Robert D. tina St., and Daniel Walsh 
Walsh of Quincy has gradu- of 27 Pleasant St., both of 
ated from the light-wheel Quincy. 
vehicle mechanic advanced He is a 1997 graduate of 
individual training (ALT) Quincy High School, 
course at Fort Jackson, Co- 
lumbia, S.C. 

Walsh is the son of Mi- 
chelle Walsh of 39 Alber- 



Sharon Miller On 
Syracuse Dean's List 

Sharon Miller of Quincy versity's College of Arts 

has been named to the and Sciences, 
dean's list for the spring ^^^ '^ ^ senior, majoring 

semester at Syracuse Uni- '" psychology. 



J trial lawyer. 

Dolan is a member of the 
BC High Mock Trial team 
>vhich tried cases before real 
judges in local courthouses. 

This was BC High's sec- 
ond year in the Massachu- 
setts Bar Association's 
Mock Trial competition. 

The competition, now in 
its 15th year, attracted a 
record number of high 



We need you. 



program of 250 mock trials 
held in courtrooms across 
the state. 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



14BEALEST 773-4600 



American Heart 
AssodatiooJ 



« 



WE'RE FIGHTING FOR YOUR LIFE 



WED&THURS JULY 26 & 27 

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GLADIATOR (R) 

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same ownership 




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DAILY LUNCHEON SPECIALS 

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Restaurant b Lounge 
15 TraMm Street, Quihc^. MA 021G9 • Tei. 412-1J15 



MON A Wis OOUAR MISHTI 



ALL SeATS 350 



y 



Quincy 
Remembers 

Ihe Quincy Millennium Committee is 
putting together a historical video on 
the city of Quincy. H you have experi' 
enced an important time or event in the 
history of Quincy, we invite you to be 
part of our video. Please submit, along 
with your name, address and telephone 
number, a short description telling us 
of your experience. 

Write to: Quincy Millennium Committee 
1 mierrymount Parlavay 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Or imail: rmerriil@ci.quinq,ma,us 



Hearing aid 

"Tips from Tobias" 




Stephen P. Tobias 

Board Certified Hearing 

Instrument Specialist 



"Do I need two 
hearing aids"? 

"Need" is the tricky word here. 

We can all manage with some 

degree of difficulty with one 

ear, one eye, etc. 

We should be asldng 

"what is my potential and how can I achieve 
it." Your choice has a tremendous impact on your 
quality of life. Recent studies have been published by 
several researchers examining the phenomenon of 
"auditory deprivation" and "acclimatization". 
The first, deprivation is the brains inability to process 
sounds and speech, because of a lack of input over 
several years time. For instance the person that waits 10 
years to get a hearing aid, expects instant correction 
and puts it in the drawer after two days of trying it. The 
brain needs time to recover this function! 
"Acclimatization" refers to the brains ability to recover or 
improve the ability to process sounds, once proper 
amplification has been introduced. It takes time and 
practice to reap the benefits of hearing aids. Yes, both 
ears should be fitted if possible and if medically 
approved. 

Now you go and spread the news! Steve 

Stephen Tobias Hearing Center 

488 Quincy Ave, Quincy, MA 02169 (next to shipyard) 

Have any topics for upcoming Tips"? Write or call 61 7 

770-3395 




Dana Smith, D.P.M. and George J. Ducach, D.P.M 
Surgeons-Podiatrists 

DID YOU KNOW THAT? 

Did you know that doctors causing severe pain and digital de- 
may be able to predict now which formities. Many patients must un- 
patients that have types of arthriti- dergo foot reconstructive prece- 
des involving inflammation, such dures that can take up to 3 hours 
asRheumatoidArthritis,areatrisk per foot and involve lengthy re- 
of developing significant joint de- cuperation periods. Con.servati ve 
structive changes? Some types, therapy, such as Physical Therapy, 
like Osteoarthritis, may cause pain shoe modifications, pharmaceuti- 
and stiffness but usually do not in- cal agents can help but, in some 
volve much inflammation (swell- individuals may be futile in terms 
ing). Rheumatoid Arthritis, on the of pain relief. A relatively simple 
other hand, can present with se- test that can identify individuals 
vere swelling, redness and in- that are at high risk of developing 
creased heat of the involved joints, advance destructive changes may 
The progression of the disease can alter the decision-making progress 
vary from person to person. Re- concerning appropriate treat- 
searchers in Finland report that ments. It could prevent months or 
synovial fluid (found in joints) can years of unnecessary suffering, 
be tested for the presence of If you are having any foot 
"carboxterminal telopeptide of problems, call and schedule an ap- 
type I collagen" (ICTP). An el- pointment at 617-773-4300. We 
evated level of ICTP may reflect are located at 1261 Furnace Brook 
the rate at which a joint is being Parkway, Suite #18, Quincy, and 
destroyed by the disease. are affiliated with Carney and 
Rheumatoid Arthritis can be South Shore Hospitals and Quincy 
very destructive to the feet, often Medical Center. 



Page 18 The Qulnoy Sun Thursday, July 27, 2000 



Sports 



Fourth Quarter TDs Lift Granite Over Havoc 




By CHRIS POISSON 

Mike Thomas only 
needed to play a half to lead 
the Quincy Granite to a thrill- 
ing, come-from-bchind 15- 
14 win over rival Massachu- 
setts Havoc Saturday night 
at Veterans Memorial Sta- 
dium. ^J^Hk. ^'^^ -r ■^Y' ^ mAjF™*' -i 

"He is the story tonight," k^Hnfl^, HJ^fl^^ft^'^ * ^ " '^^ "™^ ^^ ^ 

said offensive coordinator K if|^'''^iwRHI||[^w'' ^^^^^^Bj^BlMr '^*^ ISfi^Ji^^ V^ tfl 

Greg Wilson, who was fill- ^*u - ^^^ ^■^^^HrS^^k ^^PjB^M||,, a||||IJI 

ing in for head coach Ken ""^ ^^jt'^'^^M^^" ^^■w^^&fe.^^^-i .^^mmml^^^ W 4 

McPhee while he attended j^^y Ir w 
his nephew's wedding. W 

The story goes like this: 
Thomas needed only a half ,^ ^^^^^^H!^Bi^^^^^^^rav*i^BPS^^^^^^BK.j^HF''^^^^^^^Bim^' 
because that's all he had. He 
arrived at the stadium right 
before halftimc because of 
car troubles. ^^^ 

"I had car problems and I 
was stranded," said Thomas, 
who joined the Granite two 
days before the season 

opener. "I'm still learning the JACKSON VETIAC (28) runs the ball up the middle where he is taken down by several Havoc 
guys and I only know Dave' s defenders. (Joe Curran Photos) 

[Harris, co-founder and of- 

fensi ve lineman] phone num- he made the call, so the only the tie." Epps. Epps. a receiver, filled 
berandhisnumberwasatthe thing we can do is go out "I don't know anything in as the emergency QB m 
house. I had to wait for the ^here and execute." about the rivalry," Thomas what was an anemic first- 
car to cool down." ^'^ ^'"' ^hich pushed said. "I'm new to the area. I half performance that saw 

Once his car cooled down Quincy's record to 2-1, meant just want to play football. Quincy gain 1 8 yards in total 

and he finally arrived, more than just a regular sea- That's the only thing I plan to offense and punt on all four 

Quincy's offense ignited! son notch in the left column, do. Who knows, we'll prob- possessions. 

Thomas hooked up with This was about revenge and ably see these guys again "We were basically try- 

wideout Bill MacDougall for aspect. The Havoc ( 1 - 1 ) beat some where in the playoffs." ing not to turn the ball over," 

apairoffourth-quartertouch- the Granite twice last season, Quincy travels to Wilson said, 

down passes and hit Bo including a 27- 18 triumph in Charlestown Sunday to take While Epps & Co. didn't 

Garcia for the game-winner ^he NEFL division champi- on the Townies (2-0) and turn the ball over, the de- 

agutsytwo-pointconversion unship. then, because of bye weeks, fense forced three turnovers, 

with 3:58 remaining in the "This is our Yankees-Red it will have a two- week break, picking off Havoc quarter- 

asmc Sox," Wilson said. "There's On Aug. 19, it returns to ac- back Don Werner three times 

"They earned the right for no question about it. This is a tion to host the Maine Pride. — two by John Skabeikis 

that call," Wilson said, "They special feeling to beat them. "We have a decent foot- and one by Felipe Ogaldez. 

came back so hard in the sec- ^^^^t year they knocked us ball team and it's still early," The only points it yielded 

end half they deserved a o"' ^^ ^he playoffs, so this Thomas said. "We have to was when Werner capped off 

chance to win. That' s why I ^^^ a long time coming. And keep working and take it one a 76-yard drive with a 1 -yard 

made the call i did." that's why, again, I went for week at a time." plunge with 5:26 left in the 

"It was a gutsy call," ad- ^he two points. There's too No one was more happier half. The PAT was blocked, 

mitted Thomas. "But, hey, '""'^h history here to go for to see Thomas than Derrick (Cont'd On Page 20) 




NQHS Football Boosters 
2000 Ad Book 

You still have time to place 
your ad in this year's book 

For information call Kathy at 617-328-4489 

P.S. Don't Forget 

NQHS Football Alumni Assoc. 

Golf Tournament 

August 18th 

For information call Sean at 617-479-2995 



DERRICK EPPS (25) has his eyes locked in on the end zone as 
he scrambles for seven yards. Epps, a receiver, filled in as the 
emergency quarterback in the first half as Mike Thomas ar- 
rived late due to car problems. 

Quincy Police Riding 
For Charity Sunday 



The Quincy Police De- 
partment will be participat- 
iflg in the Harlcy Owners 
Group (HOG) of Boston's 
ninth annual "HOG in The 
Road for Charity" motorcycle 
nde Sunday to benefit the 
Boston Ronald McDonald 
House. 

More than 5,000 Hariey 
Davidson riders and 60 {w- 
Kce departments throughout 
the slate are expected to t^tke 
part in the fund-raiser — the 
largest police participation in 
the history of the event. Rid- 
ers include members of 13 
HOG chapters in Massachu- 
setts as well as riders from 
across New England. Police 
from each participating com- 
munity escort the riders on an 
80-miIe route from 
Wcstwood to Maynard. 

The ride raises proceeds 
firom a $ 1 5 donation per rider. 
Last year the ride raised more 
than $38,(KX} for the Boston 
Ronald McDonald House. 

"We are extremely grate- 
ful to the Boston Chapter of 
the Hariey Owners Group for 
their nine years of leadership 



and tireless efforts in support 
of this event, which has 
grown to become the larger 
annual fund-raiser for the 
House," said Andy Richards, 
co-director of the Boston 
Ronald McDonald House. 
"The piulicipating HOG rid- 
ers and police departments 
are enthusiastic fans of ovii 
work here, and we appreci- 
ate their unending commit- 
ment and support." 

The Hariey Davidson ride 
began in 1991 when the 
Ronald McDonald House 
provided shelter to an ill rela- 
tive of a Boston Hariey 
Davidson rider, and the 
Harlcy Owners decided to 
ride to raise funds for this 
charitable residence. 

For more than 20 years 
the Boston Ronald 
McDonald House, located in 
Brookline, has opened its 
doors as a "home away fronpi 
home" for families whose 
children are undergoing treat- 
ment for cancer at the Dana- 
Farber Cancer Institute's 
Jimmy Fund Clinic and Bos- 
ton Children's Hospital, 



Tai Chi Class At Beechwood 



Beechwood on the Bay 
announces Summer Tai Chi 
Classes will begin Friday, 
July 28 from 10-11 a.m. with 
instructor Susan Hudgens. 

Tai Chi, the "Eastern" 
martial art known as "media- 
tion in motion," is a series of 



low-impact movements that 
reduce stress, and increase 
flexibility, balance and gen- 
eral good health. 

Registration for the six- 
week session is underway. 
Class size is limited. Call 47 1 - 
5712. 



ROUND BALL 
HOOP OANP 

FOR BOYS & CIRLS 

INSTRUCTION AND tiikHES 

JUU dMIUCUST 4 ACilS d-11 

AUGUST 7-11 A6CS 12-16 

FON BROCNUm CALL 

TBD STiVCNSCN 326-d409 

tTiiri eiiiTini* 



Thursday, July 27, 2000 Tbe Qudncy Sun Page 19 



A Plaque Far 'Pudge' 




I 



FORMER RED SOX star Carlton Fisk was inducted into the baseball hall of fame Sunday 
in Cooperstown. He is best remembered in Boston for his dramatic home run to win game six 
of the 1975 World Series against the Cincinnati Reds. (Photo Quick Photo/Bill Fitzgerald) 



Golden Print Impressive 



Despite losing to Quincy 
Local in the first round. 
Golden Print advanced to the 
finals by knocking out 
Quincy Local, 7-0, in a 
rematch in recent Babe Ruth 
league playoff action. 

Golden Print will face the 
Quincy Elks later in the week 
for the city championship. 

Steve Pizzi, who retired 
the first 13 batters, held Lo- 
cal to three hits while strik- 
ing out 1 1 and walking only 
two. 

Print scored three runs in 
the first inning on a triple by 
Pizzi and hits by Ryan 
Feldhoff (3 hits) and Justin 
Thorley (2 hits). Local had a 
chance to score in the first, 
but shortstop Paul McAteer 
and second baseman Matt 
McNeil turned an outstand- 
ing inning-ending double 
play. 

In the second. Matt 



Germain led off with a triple 
and Pizzi and Thorley fol- 
lowed' with RBI singles for a 
5-0 lead. Josh Hersey (2 hits) 
and Paul Copson scored the 
final two runs. 

For local, David Jaehnig, 
Dom DelGardo and Corey 
Piazza had hits. 

Golden Print — 7 

Granite City — 5 

Justin Thorley and Ryan 
Feldhoff each had three hits. 
Paul McAteer scattered 10 
hits and had no walks in the 
complete-game win. Matt 
Germain, Mike McLaughlin 
and Josh Hersey each had a 
pair of hits. Steve Pizzi had 
an RBI single and eight as- 
sists at shortstop. 

Print's defense did a great 
job of keeping hard-hitting 
Granite City in check by cut- 
ting down a runner at the 
plate in the first inning and 
then turning a double-play in 



the fifth. 

For Granite City, Steve 
Williams (2 hits), John 
Norton ( 2 hits), James Zapata 
(triple) and Leo Ahern 
(double) powered the of- 
fense. 

Golden Print — 11 

Barry's Deli — 4 

Steve Pizzi gave up two 
hits and fanned 15 to pick up 
the win. He also did some 
damage at the plate with a 
home run, triple, three runs 
scored and four RBI. 

Matt Germain (2 hits, 4 
runs), Mike McLaughlin (2 
hits, 3 RBI), Justin Thorley 
(RBI single) and Paul Copson 
(RBI single) contributed to 
the offense. 

For Barry's Deli, Dan 
Cosgrove struck out 1 and 
walked four in a solid perfor- 
mance. Dean Sandonato had 
a double and Nick Leger a 
single. 



Yellow Cab Triple A Champs 



Yellow Cab recently cap- 
tured the Triple A champion- 
ship with a 4-2 win over 
Spillane & Epstein. 

Eleven-year-old John 
Huerth tossed a four-hit, com- 
plete-game masterpiece with 
a dozen punchouts. The south- 
paw stayed in control the whole 
game by getting ahead in the 
count on most of the batters. 

After Spillane & Epstein 
(18-5) took a 1-0 lead in the 
first inning on a walk to Jimmy 
Mullaney and consecutive 
singles by Matt Young and 
NickGizzarelli, Huerth settled 
down and cruised over the next 
five innings. 



Yellow Cab (20-2) an- 
swered with three runs in the 
third. Justin Boyd plated Ricky 
Bjork (single) with a triple and 
he scored on a single by Joe 
Ceurvals. Mike Ainsley 
knocked in Ceurvals with a 
-double. 

In the fifth. Yellow Cab 
scored an insurance run on 
singles by Boyd and Ceurvals 
and another double by Ainsley. 

Spillane & Epstein made a 
gallant effort to even the game 
in the sixth when Brendan 
Marsters walked and came 
around to score, but Huerth 
got the next batter to ground 
out to end the game. 



For Yellow Cab, Mike 
Saville, Andrew Gormley and 
Huerth added singles. Young 
turned in a gutsy pitching per- 
formance for Spillane & 
Epstein by keeping his team 
close the entire game. 

Both clubs provided some 
great defensive plays. Chris 
Baker, Taylor Brean and 
Marsters all made quality plays 
in the infield for Spillane & 
Epstein. For Yellow Cab, 
Brennan Carey played a sU-ong 
game behind the plate, tag- 
ging out two runners trying to 
score. Mark Pepjonovich made 
two outstanding plays at sec- 
ond base. 




'Wife**-- .,.„_,.....__„. _. 

WISIALKO AND ASSOCIATES are city champions of the Mary Pratt Softball division for the 
fourth straight year. Front row, from left, are Mary Bloomer, Beth Bloomer, Lisa Schifone, Katie 
Barry. Back row, assistant coach Dave Andrew, Kellyanne Moore, Deanna lacobucci, Kerri 
McAteer, Stacey Andrew, Marissa Powers, Michelle Pilalas, Marilyn Power and coach Steve 
Pilalas. Missing from photo is Casey Lorman. 

Wisialko And Associates 
Wins 4th Pratt Softball Title 



Wisialko and Associates 
recently pulled out an amaz- 
ing come-from-behind win 
over Everlasting Engraving, 
20-15, to win its fourth 
straight Mary Pratt Softball 
city championship at Pagent 
Field. 

Trailing 14-5 in the fifth 
inning, Wisialko scored 10 
runs in the last three innings 
to tie the game at 1 5, and then 
scored five runs in the top of 



the eighth for the victory. 

Mary Bloomer, who came 
on in relief in the fifth inning, 
picked up the win, allowing 
only one run in the final four 
innings. She received some 
great defensive plays from 
Kerri McAteer, Lisa 
Schifone, Marissa Powers 
and Beth Bloomer. 

Michelle Pilalas (3 for 5) 
and Marilyn Power (2 for 4) 
hit back-to-back doubles in 



the fifth to ignite the rally. 
Stacey Andrew (3 for 5, 
double), Schifone (2 for 4) 
and Mary Bloomer (2 for 5) 
also contributed offensively. 

For Everlasting Engrav- 
ing, Michelle Boyd (double), 
Rebbeca Sorensen, Ashley 
Nee and Stephanie Stone 
each went 2 for 5. Nee played 
an outstanding defensive 
game at shortstop. 




EVERLASTING ENGRAVING finished runner-up in the Mary Pratt Softball city champion- 
ship. From the left are Teresa Rand, Jessica Smilate, Racheile Sorensen, Swan, Spring, Stephanie 
Stone, Michelle Boyd, Maria McGinnis, Rebbeca Sorensen, Ashley Nee, Danielle Rand, Courtney 
Rand, Christine Perry, Doug Sorensen, Courtney Barton. 

Babe Ruth All-Stars Third In State 



The Quincy 13-year-old 
Babe Ruth All-Stars finished 
third in recent state tourna- 
ment play after bowing out 
to Norwood, 6-3, in a hard- 
fought game. 

Norwood advanced to the 
championship game to take 
on Parkway. 

Forced to play its second 
doubleheader in two days, 
totaling 33 innings, Quincy 
fell behind 2-0 to Norwood 
early. After a Nick Malvesti 
single and a John Folino 
double, Bobby Newcomb 
made it 2-1 with an RBI 
single. 

But Norwood grabbed a 
5- 1 lead in the third. Quincy 
got a run back on Malvesti's 
sacrifice fly, and it closed to 
5-3 when Dean Sandonato 
singled home Dave Jaehnig 
(walk, stolen base) from sec- 
ond base. 

Quincy opened the tour- 
nament last Thursday with a 
6-2 win over Lawrence. 
Sandonato turned in a strong 



pitching performance, giving 
up five hits in 5 2/3 innings 
with eight strikeouts. Jaehnig 
allowed no hits in relief. 

Justin Thorley wielded the 
big stick with three hits and 
two RBI. Steve. Priscclla 
(RBI) and Sandonato each 
had two hits, while Chris 
M ari nel I i and Fol i no knocked 
in runs. 

Quincy fell to Norwood, 
1 1-8, in the second game of 
the tourney. Trailing 9-1 in 
the bottom of the fifth, 
Quincy rallied for three runs 
with Kevin Richardson, 
Jaehnig and Thorley deliver- 
ing in the clutch. 

Quincy pulled within 9-8 
in the sixth after scoring four 
runs with two outs. Malvesti 
(2 hits) stroked a two-run 
single and Jaehnig (3 hits) 
and Sandonato added RBI 
hits. 

Quincy needed 10 innings 
to take care of Taunton, 6- 1 . 
Jaehnig took the rubber, 
pitching a masterful game by 



allowing only one run on six 
hits before giving way to 
Sandonato. 

Trailing 1-0. Quincy tied 
it in the third when Sandonato 
knocked in Matt Tobin 
(walk) with a single. Folino 
came through with the de- 
fensive play of the game 
when he threw out a runner at 
home that would have been 
the winning run. 

In the 10th inning. Quincy 
scored five runs for the win. 
Jaehnig, Sandonato and 
Folino knocked in the runs. 

In its next game, Quincy 
went into extra innings again 
when it squeezed out an 8-7 
win over Cambridge in the 
eighth. Richardson walked 
and stole second (his fourth 
of the game), and Jaehnig 
ripped a single to bring him 
in for the game-winner. 

Thorley pitched a terrific 
game, fanning six and yield- 
ing just four hits in seven 
innings. 



I* W V WWM kCMtto^fa* 



*a«4«««**««*« 



Page 20 Ttim Qttlney Sim Thursday, July 27, 2000 




Granite Have Role Player 
In Mike Thomas 



THE OFFENSE breaks from its huddle and heads to the line of scrimmage eariy in Saturday's 
15-14 win over Mass Havoc at Veterans Memorial Stadium. From the left, Jeff Powers (81), 
James Messicks (57), David Harris (64), Mike Lynch (51), Jason Vaga (95) and Jackson Vetiac 

(28). Behind Lynch are Derrick Epps and Bo Garcia. 

(Joe Curran Photos) 

Fourth Quarter IDs 
Lift Granite Over Havoc 



(Cont'd From Page 18) 
In the second half, things 
didn't start out so smoothly 
as Thomas's first pass went 
through MacDougall ' s hands 
for an interception. The 
Havoc capitalized when 
Werner hit running back 
Todd Mathis in the flat for a 
9-yard TD pass with 10:(K) 
left in the third. Werner and 
Mathis hooked up again on 
the two-point conversion for 
a 14-0 lead. 

"We came out and had a 
little funk," Thomas said. 
"We were a little confused. 
The head coach wasn't here. 
But Greg Wilson did a great 
job keeping everything to- 
gether." ^ 

Quincy had to punt on its 
ensuing possession, but Tho- 
mas, who would like to be a 
punter in the NFL one day, 
was able to pin the Havoc at 
the two-yard line. The Havoc 
couldn't move the ball and 
dn fourth down they botched 
the punt attempt, giving 
Quincy great field position at 
the 26. 

On third down, Thomas 
heaved a 27-yard strike to 
MacDougall to get Quincy 
on the board with 12:07 left. 
Paul Doherty's extra point 
cut the lead to 14-7. 

After the Havoc went 




By CHRIS POISSON 

Mike Thomas played 
more roles in the Quincy 
Granite's 15- 14 win over the 
Mass Havoc than Will Ferrell 
on Saturday nights. 

His cast of characters, in 
order of appearance, in- 
cluded Mike Thomas the 
Punter, Mike Thomas the 
Quarterback, Mike Thomas 
the Leader, and Mike Tho- 
mas the Savior. It was like he 
was auditioning to host Sat- 
urday Night Live. 

His performance 

would' ve landed him thejob. 
His intro was peerless be- 
cause, well, there was no 
intro. Battling car problems, 
Thomas missed the opening 
introductions, the first quar- 
ter, and the second quarter 
before arriving at Veterans 
Memorial Stadium in time to 
start the second half. 

"I apologized to the guys 
because something like that 
really messes up the chemis- 
try on the field," Thomas said. 
"I take this serious. This is 
semi-pro but you still have to 
be on time and do every- 
thing. 

"I thought it was still in 
the first quarter when 1 got 
here, but they had already 
played the half. I was like, 
'man.' But the guys kept it 
together and we were only 
down by six." 

And that's when Thomas 
punched in on the time clock 
and went to work. After his 
first pass attempt was picked 
off to set up the Havoc's sec- 
ond touchdown for a 14-0 
lead, Thomas tried to engi- 
neer another drive on the en- 



suing possession, only to see 
it stall at the Havoc 42 thanks 
to a few penalties. 

Facing a fourth-and-12 
situation, Quincy opted to 
punt rather than go for it — a 
wise move. Thomas the 
Punter booted the ball high 
into the sky and watched it 
come spiraling down at the 
2-yard line. He would like to 
one day punt in the NFL and 
if he keeps kicking like that 
he'll soon find himself in a 
pro camp. 

The punt proved to be a 
turning point in the game 
when the Havoc was forced 
to punt from their 1 5 on their 
next series — aiid when they 
fumbled the snap, leaving 
Quincy in great position at 
the 26, Thomas the QB took 
over in the fourth quarter. 

On third down, Thomas 
spotted a wide open Bill 
MacDougall for a 27-yard 
TD strike to pull within seven 
after Paul Doherty's extra 
point. About eight minutes 
later, he connected with 
MacDougall for a 28-yard 
TD on almost the sam^ exact 
play. 

"The offensive line did a 
tremendous job to give me 
time," Thomas said. "We just 
spread the guys out and Bill 
made two great catches. We 
have to spread some teams 
out instead of letting guys 
come up and press and try to 
play man. I feel if you come 
up and play man, you're dar- 
ing us." 

"We're trying to build the 
offense around some of the 
skills he has," said offensive 
coordinator Greg Wilson. 



"It'scoming together slowly. 
But if you look up and down 
our roster we're stacked with 
skilled players. The idea is 
that he is the right person to 
make plays and get the ball 
into their hands." 

Following MacDougall's 
second touchdown, Wilson, 
who was filling in for head 
coach Ken McPhee while he 
attended his nephew's wed- 
ding, decided to try the two- 
point conversion and get the 
win. 

Now, this is where Tho- 
mas the Leader steps in. 

Two weeks ago, wide re- 
ceiver Bo Garcia left the 
Boston Cowboys because he 
was not getting enough play- 
ing time behind standout re- 
ceivers Chris Walker and 
Bunny Jefferson. In Quincy' s 
29-0 wjn over Hyannis, his 
debut with the Granite, 
Garcia dropped three balls, 
two that would' ve been 
touchdowns. 

No one would've been 
surprised if Thomas didn't 
look in Garcia' s direction 
with the game on the line — 
even if there was no one 
within 10 yards of him. For 
Thomas, it was the perfect 
opportunity to show support 
for a teammate. 

"He came into the 
huddle," recalled offensive 
lineman David Harris, "and 
said to Bo Garcia, 'This play 
is going to you. This is your 
chance to redeem yourself 
for last week.'" 

Garcia made the catch. 
Granite won. Quincy say 
hello to Thomas the Savior. 



238 Youngsters Compete In 
Hersey Track & Field Meet 



GREG WILSON goes over some plays with the offensive unit 
Wilson, the team's offensive coordinator, served as the head 
coach while Ken McPhee attended his n^iew's wedding. 

three-and-out, Quincy took setting up the game-winning 

over at its 22 with just under two-pointer, 

eight minutes to play. On the The Havoc had the ball 

sixth play of the drive, with about 3:30 left to play, 

MacDougall beat his man but Skabeikis picked off his 

onc-on-one and Thomas fired third pass of the game to seal 

a 28-yard bullet for the TD, the win. 



reation Department staff who 
officiated at the meet. 
The Quincy winners are: 
Maxine Daniels, Joeanna 
Timmons, Nicole Aff annato, 
Krystin Newsom, Alex Nee, 





Football Alumni Golf Tourney 



fifth anayal North 

acy Foofball Aiomni 

roumamcnt will be held 

^ Aug. IS^theOeoige 

* ^-^HCamx in Hyde 



nuunciit will i 
{Aasiidtgun start 
7:30 a.m. Vtv 
Ipaidtbefoot 



bdl p^fi^^sm at North Quincy 
High School as well as to 
Start a schdatBhip program. 
For a $100 cany fee all 
players will receive a coi- 
!a:ed rr-lf stot, continental 
nd a steak dinoc 
immediately after at the 



attending the reception after 
they may do so for $30. Hole 
spensorships are also avail- 
able for $100. All money 
nHlfabcreceiveH nnlateri 
Avv: 4. 

e infonnMion^ 
playing, atteni ecep- 

ill 



Strength IVaining Class At Beechwood 



Beechwood on the Bay 
amiounces a new strength 
training class will begin 
Wednesday, Aug. 2 from 10- 
11 a.m. with instructor 
Kathleen Hefber. 



The six- week program for 
beginners, is designed to im- 
prove muscle strength, bal- 
ance and body tone, using 
weights and stretch bands. 

Oass size is small so the 



instructor can assist with per- 
sonal goals and woric indi- 
vidually toward greater 
strength and fitness. 

For more information or 
to sign up, call 471-5712. 



Recreation Director Barry in 70 other meets statewide. 

Welch announces that 238 The top 16 in the events will 

youngsters competed at the be invited to the state cham- 

recent23id annual Hershey's pionship. 

National Track and Field The winners of the state 

Local Meet at Veterans Me- meet will have their times 

morial Stadium. and distances compared with Taylor Raftery, Amy 

The boys and girls, ages other New England state Carchedi, Lauren Stille, Lisa 

9-14, competed in the long champions and the top quali- Mulligan, Kayla Martin, 

jump. Softball throw, 50- fiers will go to the National Melissa Mendall, Kerry 

meter dash, 100-meter dash. Championship in Hershey Regan, Mathilde Mouthon. 

400-meter dash, 4x100 re- Park, Pa. All expenses for Eileen Deasy, Brighid Kyle, 

lay, 800-meter run and 1600- national qualifiers are paid Katie O'Brien, Brenna 

meter run in three separate by Hershey Park, and no fees O'Brien, Makini Thompson, 

age groups. are charged at any level. Andrea Celata, Emily 

The Hershey's Program The Quincy meet has sent Keohan, Siobhan Green, 

is the largest youth sports participants to the state fi- 

program of its kind in the nals for all 23 years and to 

United States. It was devel- the national finals for 18 of 

oped to offer a quality recre- 23 years, 

ational activity, where chil- Welch notes that "volun- 

dien have fun and are intro- teers are the heart of the pro- Regan, Kevon Mason, Mark 

duced to physical fitness gram" and he thanks the woric Jordan, Matt Martin, John 

through basic track and field of Quincy Track Club Direc- 

events. ^^r Geoff Hennessey for his 

The winners of the Quincy outstanding commitment to 

meet will be compared to this program, as well as the 

boys and girls who competed members of the Quincy Rec- DeLasMorenas, Eric Wilson 

Amf Leung Graduates Harvard CoUege 

Amy Leung of Quincy Quincy High School, is the She concentrated in gov- 

recently graduated from daughter of Wanda and emment and graduated with 

Harvard College. Michael Leung of Quincy. a bachelors degree, cum 

Leung, a graduate of laude. 



Beth Goodrich, Tim Stille, 
Nicholas Poles, Frankie 
Flora, Shane Regan, David 
Allen, Michael Pan, Michael 



Kelliher, John Huerth, Guled 
Ali, Chris Pratt, Jack 
Kilcommons, Alex Ricciaidi, 
Matt Kerns, Antonio 



^-:r.y:' 



_>** . ->r-:aciac»**- ■ 



Thursday, July 27, 2000 Tbe Quiiuyy Sun Page 21 



I^ELieiCN 



United Methodist 



Bethany Congregational 



United Methodist 



The annual Vacation 
Bible School at Union Con- 
gregational Church, 136 
Rawson Rd., WoUaston, 
drew to a close last Friday 
evening with a closing pro- 
gram. 

Rev. Martha Swanson, 
director, coordinated and ran 
one of the most successful 
and fun Vacation Bible 
School programs on the 
South Shore. 

Highlight of this year's 
program was an abundance 
of staff people who were vol- 
unteers not only from Union 
Church but throughout the 



community. 

Children and staff enjoyed 
a wonderful meal at the clos- 
ing program prepared by 
Union Chef, William 
Melone. 

The program began Mon- 
day, July 1 7 and ran each day 
from 9 a.m. to noon with a 
closing program and dinner 
at 6 p.m. on Friday. 

In other church news, Rev. 
John Swanson, pastor, has 
been appointed to the Gen- 
eral Council of the Metro- 
politan Boston Conference 
of the United Church of 
Christ. 



Houghs Neck Congregational 



Rev. Deryck Mason, min- 
ister. Highland Church, Ja- 
maica Plain, will be the guest 
speaker at the 9:30 a.m. wor- 
ship service Sunday at 
Houghs Neck Congrega- 
tional Church, 310 Manet 
Ave., 

Members of the Highland 



Church will be guests, con- 
tinuing a long-standing cus- 
tom. 

Music by Mrs. Mason, 
soprano soloist. 

Service will be conducted 
by Dr. Peter Corea. 

Coffee hour will Jollow 
the service. All are welcome. 



The Lord's Planting 



Pastor Bill Donahue will 
preach the sermon, "Keep- 
ing Your Head in All Situa- 
tions" at the 9:30 and 1 1 a.m. 
worship services Sunday at 
The Lord's Planting, Quincy 
Foursquare Church, 65 
Newbury Ave., North 
Quincy. 

Those needing transpqr- 
tation to the church should 



call 847-4444. Childcare is 
available during service 
times. The church is handi- 
cap accessible. 

Movie night is every other 
Thursday at 7:30 p.m. on the 
church lawn. Popcorn, re- 
freshments and admission is 
free. The movie "Alaska" will 
be shown Thursday, Aug. 10. 



Save The Bird Sanctuary 
Coalition Cruise Fundraiser 



The Coalition to save the 
Bird Sanctuary will hold 
"The Great Open Space Har- 
bor Cruise" aboard the Bos- 
ton Bell Wednesday, Aug. 
23. 

The boat will depart Ma- 
rina Bay in Squantum at 7 
p.m. and return at 10 p.m. 

Donation is $30 per per- 
son which includes refresh- 
ments. 



Participants will enjoy a 
sail around Boston Harbor 
and hear the latest news on 
the effort to save the Bird 
Sanctuary (Lot 23) and 
Quincy 's other environmen- 
tally sensitive parcels. 

Reservations should be 
made by Aug. 16. 

For more information, 
contact Ian Cooke, 
NEPWRA at 781-575-0354. 



Bill Norton Chairperson 
Senior Residents Council 



Bill Norton, a resident of 
Pagnano Towers, was re- 
cently elected chairperson of 
the Senior Residents Coun- 
cil. 

Also elected were: 
Helen MacDonald, of 
Sawyer Towers, vice chair- 
person; and Mary Ann Mor- 
ris of Drohan Apartments, 
secretary/treasurer. 



The Senior Residents 
Council has been in opera- 
tion for four years. Officers 
work between senior resi- 
dents of Quincy Housing 
Authority and the Authority 
itself. Meetings are held the 
second Tuesday of each 
month at a different building. 

Officers are elected each 
July and begin their terms in 
September. 



Cerebral Palsy Golf Outing 



Cerebral Palsy of Massa- 
chusetts will hold a Golf 
Outing Monday, Aug. 21 at 
Presidents' Golf Course with 
a shot-gun style start at 8 
a.m. 

Title sponsor is South 
Shore Savings Bank. 



Foursomes' including a 
hole sponsorship is $395; in- 
dividual golfers arc $75. A 
New England style clambake 
will follow at 1 p.m. 

For reservations, call 6 1 7- 
479-7443, ext. 101. 



Bethany Congregational 
Church, Quincy Center, will 
have Sunday worship ser- 
vices at 8:30 and 10 a.m. 

Rev. William Harding, 
pastor, will preach on 
"Rested on the 7th Day." 
Scripture reader will be 
Winslow Bettinson. 

Music for the 1 a.m. ser- 
vice will feature Paul Frazer, 



bariton with Thomas Boyer, 
organist. 

Gloria Morgan will be the 
greeter. 

A Fellowship Hour will 
be held following the 10 a.m. 
service. 

There will be a One Room 
Church School and childcare 
will be available for infants 
and toddlers. 



The Rev. Carol Stine will 
have "Spiritual Gifts - 11" as 
her sermon topic at the 10 
a.m. worship service Sunday 
at Quincy Community 
United Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St., Wollaston. 

Ernest Bromaghin will be 
the lector. 

Anne Giger will serve as 
the greeter and Sybil Whyte 



and Lanada Conant will be 
the ushers. 

The Pastor will narrate the 
children's message. Coffee 
hour will be hosted by Ginny 
Hawes and Martha Smith. 



WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



American Heart 
Association^ 



« 



UtttCg 



ton jj^xYtdar^ 



SERVICES & ACTIVITIES 




lies 




158 Washington :>t, Quincy 

pi)one: 773-9797 

Rev. Gregory E. Wheaton, Pastor 

New Summer Schedule 

Morning Worship 

8:30 & 10:30 Al^ 

4Youth & Children's Ministry 

A«Contemporary Worship 

m •Marriage & Famliy Group 

■I •International Fellowship 

^^^ •DivorceCare 




Our Lady Of Good 
Counsel Parish 

227 Sea St., Quincy 
(617)472-1408 

MASSES 

Saturday 4:30 p.m. 

Sunday 

9 AM & 11AM 

Daily Mass 9 AM 



STAR OF THE SEA CHURCH 
Squantum, MA 328-0866 

Sunday Mass (4:00PM Saturday) 

8:30 & 10AM Sunday 

Daily Mass 9:00AM 

Confessions 3:00-3:45PM (sat) 

Baptisms every Sunday at 1 1am 



Saint Ann's Church 

757 Hancock Street Wollaston • 479-5400 

Pastor: Rev. Monsignor Robert P. Deeley 

Weekend Mass Schedule: Sat 4:00 & 7:00 PM, 

Sunday 7:00, 8:45, 11:00AM 

Daily Masses: 9:00 AM 

Handicapped Chairlift Available 



Church Of St. John 
The Baptist 

44 School St., Quincy 
773-1021 

MASS SCHEDULE: 

Daily 8:00 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 

Saturday 4 p.m. 

Sunday 7, 9 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 

1 1 a.m. -Family Liturgy 

Confessions In Chapel 

Saturday 3-3:45 p.m. 

Rectory: 21 Gay St. 

Hanclicapped Accessible 

St. Joseph's Church 

550 Washington Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

617-472-6321 

SUNDAY MASSES: 

4 p.m. (On Saturday) 

8:30, 10, 11:30 a.m. & 5 pm 

Weekday Masses 9am 

CONFESSIONS: Saturday, 3:15-3:45 pm 

Handicapped accessible & 

Handicapped parking, side entrance 

air conditioned 



Sacred Heart Church 

"A Roman Catholic Community walking togettier 

in Faith, Worship, Education and Sen/ice' 

386 Hancock St., 

North Quincy, MA 02171 

(617)328-8666 

Sunday Masses 

4pm (Sat.) 7:45am, 9am (Family Liturgy) 

10:30am (with Choir) 12 noon and 5pm 

Weekday Masses 

Mon.-Frf 7am and 9am, Sat. 9am 

Handicapped Acx:essible 

Confessions 

Sat. 3-3:45pm in Saint Joseph Oratory 



St Mary's Church 

95 Crescent St., Quincy • 773-0120 

Masses 

Saturday, 4pm, Sunday 7, 9:30 

& 11:30am, Weekdays 9am 

Handicapped Accessible 

New Menibers Welcome! 



HOUGHS NECK 
CONGREGATIONAL 

CHURCH 

310 Manet Ave., Quincy 
Sunday Service Of Worship 

9:30 AM Summer Schedule 

Guest Speaiier. 

Rev. Deiycl< Mason 

Minister 

Highland Church, Jania'ica Plain 

Wheelchair accessible 

Air conditioned 

Use And Observe 

The Sabbath. 

Keep It Holy. 

Or Lose It! 



QUINCY POINT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

444 Washington Street • 773-6424 
10AM Worship Service 

Rev. Leighton Foss, 
Interim Pastor Preaching 



UNION CONGREGATIONAL 
CHURCH 

Beach St. & Rawson Rd., Wollaston 

479-6661 

'Jesus Feeds The Five Thousand' 

Pastor Rev John Cad Swanson 



BETHANY CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

Corner of Spear & Coddington Sts., 

Quincy Center • 479-7300 

8:30 & 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 

Rev. William Harding, Pastor 

'Rested On the 7th Day 

Summer Church School 

Childcare Available 




St. Chrysostom*s 
Episcopal Church 

Corner of Hancock & Linden Sts. 

Wollaston • (617) 472-0737 
Sunday 8 & lOam 
HohLEucharist 
' Sunday School 
& Nursery at lOam 

Thrift Shop open 
Wed-Fri I0am-4pm 
Everybody Welcome 







il 



The Lord's Planting 

Quincy Foursquare Ciiurch 

Corner of Newbury Ave. & 

Sagamore St., N. Quincy 

847-4444 

Sunday Service 9:30 A 11 AM 

'Keeping Your Head in AH Situations' 



^ 



QUINCY COMMUNITY 
UNITED METHODIST 
CHURCH 

40 Beale St., Wollaston • 773-3319 

10 AM Sunday Worship 

Rev. Carol Stine Preaching 

'Spiritual Gifts ■ II' 



ii'iHW >H iJ 



Nazarene 



Wollaston 
Church Of The Nazarene 

37 East Elm Ave., Wollaston, 472-5669 

Interim pastor Neale McLaIn 

Rev. Samuel Cttung: Pastor 

Quincy Chinese Church of the Nazarene 

Sunday Services, 8:30am Holy Communion 

9:30am Cantonese Worship (Shader Hall) 

9:45anri Christian Education (all ages) 

1 1am Morning Worship Celebration 

* Nursery Care and Children's Church through grade 4 

6pm Evening Service (contemporary) 

The Wollaston Church of the Nazarene is 

air cxmditioned and wheelchair accessit)le. 

ALL ARE WELCOME 



THE SALVATION ARMY 

6 Baxter St., Quincy • 472-2345 

9:45 SUNDAY SCHOOL 

11AM WORSHIP SERVICE 

6PM PRAISE SERVICE 

7PM TUES WOMEN'S FELLOWSHIP 

7:15PM WED BIBLE STUDY 



Splrituaiisat 



First Spiritualist 
Church of Quincy 

40 West St., Quincy, MA 02169 
(617) 770-2246 

Service Wednesdays 8pm 
Pastor Rev Rita S. Berkowitz, C.H.,C.M. 



TO ADVERTISE IN 

THIS DIRECTORY, 

CALL 471-3100 



Page 22 Tl&e Qvdnoy Stin Thursday, July 27, 2000 



C)l9 1 TD Al^ I ES 



Gertrude H. Frazer 



A funeral service for 
Gertrude H. Fr^er of 
Quincy, a retired music li- 
brarian for Milton public 
schools, was held yesterday 
(Wednesday) at the Boylston 
Congregational Church in 
Jamaica Plain. 

She died July 21. 

Miss Frazer was an or- 



She is survived by several 
cousins. She was the daugh- 
ter of the late Samuel and 
Gertrude (Hamlin) Frazer, 
and the sister of the late John 
Frazer. 

Burial was in Cedar Grove 
Cemetery, Dorchester. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Dennis Sweeney 



Elda C. Rounseville, 93 

Taught Piano And Bai^jo To Blind, 
Entertained At Nursing Homes 



Warren J. Lynch, 75 

Retired Supervisor 



ganist for the Boylston Con- Funeral Home, 326Copeland 
gregational Church. St. 




SCOTT DEWARE 



ATkOI/GHT 

fOR We JVeeK 

If you would increase your happiness 
and prolong your life, forget your 
brother's faults. Forget the slander you 
have heard, forget the temptations, for- 
get the fault-finding, and give more 
thought to the cause that provoked it 
Forget the peculiarities of your friends, 
and only remember the good points that 
make you fond of them. Forget all personal quarrels you may 
have heard by accident, of which, if repeated, would seem a 
thousand times worse than they really are. Obliterate every- 
thing disagreeable from yesterday: start with a clean sheet for 
today, and write upon it, for sweet memory's sake, only the 
things which are lovely and lovable. 

There is an old Chinese proverb which states: '^ink of 
your own faults the first part <^ the night when you are awake, 
and the faults of others the latter part of the night when you are 
asleep." 

Something to thiiric about? We think so! . . . 

Deware Family Funeral Homes 

Serving All Faiths & Nationalities 

Wollaston Chapel H£mnel Chapel 

576 Hancock Street 86 Copeland Street 

Quincy, MA 02170 W. Quincy, MA 02169 

A (617) 472-1137 
Affordability Plus Service 
Advanced Planning • Cremation Service Available 
Services Rendered To Any Distance 



A funeral service for Elda 
C. (Buchanan) Rounseville, 
93, of Quincy, who gave free 
piano and banjo lessons to 
blind South Shore residents, 
was held Tuesday at Houghs 
Neck Congregational 
Church, 310 Manet Ave. 

She died July 20 at Queen 
Anne Nursing Facility in 
Hingham after a brief illness. 

Mrs. Rounseville, known 
by many as "the Music 
Lady," shared her musical 
talent with service groups for 
the blind and nursing homes. 
She received a Lions Life- 
time Achievement Award for 
her services in 1998. 

She was a member of the 
Lions Club, the Order of East- 
em Star and Houghs Neck 
Congregational Church, 
where she was a pianist and a 
teacher of Sunday School. 

Bom in Nova Scotia, she 
moved to the United States 




ELDA ROUNSEVILLE 

Quincy florist, she is survived 
by two sons, John W. 
Rounseville and Uncle Sam 
Rounseville, both of Quincy ; 
a daughter, Nancy Kropp of 
Seminole, Fla.; seven grand- 
children and seven great- 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Lydon Funeral 
Home, 644 Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 



A funeral Mass for War- 
ren J. "Bud" Lynch, 75, of 
Quincy, who worked for 30 
years for the city of Boston, 
was celebrated July 20 at St. 
John the Baptist Church. 

He died July 16 at the 
Milton Healthcare Facility 
after a long illness. 

Mr. Lynch was a supervi- 
sor with die Boston Water 
and Sewer Department until 
his retirement in 1986. 

He served in the Army 
during World War II and the 
Korean War, and was a 50- 
year member of the Ameri- 
can Legion and a member of 
the Abington American Le- 
gion Post and the Y.D. Post 
in Dorchester. 

He was also a fourth-de- 
gree member of the Knights 



of Columbus and a member 
of the Redberry Council 1 1 7 
of Dorchester. 

Mr. Lynch was bom and 
educated in Dorchester and 
lived there for most of his life 
before moving to Quincy 12 
years ago. 

He is survived by a 
brother, John F. Lynch of 
Greenville, N.C; a sister, 
Mary E. Dilworth of Quincy ; 
and many nieces and neph- 
ews. 

Burial was in St. Joseph's 
Cemetery, West Roxbury. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Sweeney Brothers 
Home for Funerals, 1 Inde- 
pendence Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to Father Bill's Place, 38 
Broad St., Quincy 02169. 



Cecil Campbell, 82 

Retired Supervisor For Boston School Dept 



in 1928. She attended Bryant to Houghs Neck Congrega- 



and Stratton Business Col- 
lege and worked as a book- 
keeper for many years. 

Wife of the late Roy 
Rounseville, a well-known 



tional Church Sunday 
School, 300 Manet Ave., 
Quincy 02169, or to Father 
Bill's Place, 38 Broad St., 
Quincy 02169. 

Charles Rubino, 77 

Restaurant Owner 

A funeral Mass for in Wollaston. 
Charles "Clarkie" Rubino, Mr. Rubino died July 19 

77, of Quincy, former owner at South Shore Hospital in 

and operator of the former Weymouth. 



Villa Capri Restaurant in 
Dorchester, was celebrated 
July 22 at St. Ann's Churfch 




The Cremation Society Of Massachusetts 

'^Massachusetts' largest provider of cremation information." 

The Cremation Society of Massachusetts was established to offer 
an alternative to the costly mortuary-funeral-cemetery-system. We 
believe in offering a reasonable price for a dignified and profes- 
sional service. 

We currently have two location, Quincy and Harwich, to service 
the South Shore and Cape Cod areas. 

If you would like a free no-obligation brochure on our services, 
please call (617) 472-0098, write to 26 Adams St., Quincy, MA 02169, 
or visit our website at www.cremation.org 

Affiliated with the Hamel, Wickens & Troupe Funeral Home. 
A family-owned and operated funeral home since 1932. 

Cremation Society of Massachusetts 

(617) 472-0098 



26 Adams Street, Quincy, MA 02169 
1-800-696-5887 
1-617-472-5888 



678 Main Street, Harwich, MA 02645 
P.O. Box 5312 • 
1-800-696-5887 



Mr. Rubino was also the 
former owner and operator 
of Damone's Restaurant in 
Chelsea, as well as various 
fruit and produce businesses. 
He retired seven years ago. 

Bom in Boston, he had 
lived in Wollaston for the 
past 30 years. 

He served in the Army 
from 1943 to 1944. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Pauline (VanHooser) Rubino 
of Wollaston; two sons, 
Charles Richard Rubino of 
Hanson and Anthony James 
Rubino of Quincy; and three 
grandsons. 

Burial was in St. 
Michael's Cemetery, Boston. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Heart Asso- 
ciation, 20 Speen St., 
Framingham 01710. 



A funeral Mass for Cecil 
J. Campbell, 82, of Quincy, a 
retired supervisor for the 
Boston School Department, 
was celebrated July 22 at St. 
John the Baptist Church, 44 
School St. 

• Mr. Campbell died July 
20 at Quincy Medical Cen- 
ter. 

He worked for the school 
department's Planning and 
Engineering Department for 
39 years, retiring in 1976. 

Bom in Everett, he was 
educated in Boston. 
• He lived in Quincy for the 
past 13 years. Previously, he 
had lived in Abington for a 
short time and in Dorchester 
for many years. 

He served in the Navy 
during World War II. 



Mr. Campbell was a mem- 
ber of the Old Dorchester 
American Legion Post 65. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Ardria "Audrey" H. 
(Seekins) Campbell; three 
daughters^ Barbara R. 
Murphy of Wollaston, Vir- 
ginia C. Vigliotti of Lynn, 
and Karen E. Kenney of 
Hingham; three sisters, Mary 
Grey of Lexington, Barbara 
O'Hara of South Dartmouth, 
and Rose Rielan of Lexing- 
ton; f 9 grandchildren and 24 
great-grandchildren. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery, West Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney Broth- 
ers Home for Funerals, 1 In- 
dependence Ave., Quincy 
Center. 



Lydia Gallagher, 98 



A funeral Mass for Lydia 
(Croteau) Gallagher, 98, of 
Quincy, a homemaker, was 
celebrated July 21 at St. 
Ann's Church. 

She died July 19 at Quincy 
Medical Center. 

Born in Winchendon, 
Mrs. Gallagher had lived in 
Quincy the past 55 years. 

Wife of the late Harold J. 
Gallagher, she is survived by 
three sons, Harold J. 
Gallagher Jr. of Quincy, Rob- 



^'"■*i^v- 



ert F. Gallagher of Braintree 
and Donald J. Gallagher of 
Middleboro; adaughter, Mae 
C. Marston of Plymouth; 14 
grandchildren; 39 great- 
grandchildren and 1 1 great- 
great-grandchildren. 

She was the mother of the 
late Daniel J. Gallagher and 
Stephen Gallagher. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 



i'i',Llij,l,l., 




DENNIS SWEENEY 
FUNERAL HOMES 

Quincy s First for Three Generations 
Dennis S. Sweeney Joseph M. Reardon 

Funeral Directors 
74 Elm Street • 326 Copeland Street • 617-773-2728 



^ « r .•■ 



ccr: 



Thursday, July 27, 2000 Tbe Qulncy Sun Page 23 



Antonio G. Morano, 84 

Retired Custodian 

A funeral Mass for Anto- Quincy City Council in honor 

nio G. Morano, 84, of of his award. 

QUincy, a retired custodian. Bom in South Boston, he 

will be celebrated today had lived in Quincy for the 

(Thursday) at 1 a.m. at Most past 42 years. 

Blessed Sacrament Church, Husband of the late Mary 

Houghs Neck. R.(McManus) Morano, he is 



Charles Kapolis, 74 

Former Manager At George H. Dean Co. 



Alfred Kemp, 80 

Retired Employee Of Broclcway Smith Supplies 



He died Monday at Colo- 
nial Nursing and Rehabilita- 
tion Center, Weymouth. 

Mr. Morano worked for 
MDC at Old Colony Police 
Station in South Boston for 
25 years, retiring in 1980. 

He was a volunteer at 
Quincy Meals on Wheels 
Program. 

In 1995, he was awarded 
"Senior of the Year" from 
the South Shore Elder Ser- 
vices at a banquet in his 
honor. He received the award 
in honor of his contributions, 
dedication and service to the 
elders of the South Shore. 

He also received procla- 
mations from the Governor, 
State Senate, State House of 



survived by a son, George A. 
Morano of Quincy, three 
brothers, Frank Morano, 
Robert Morano and Luca 
Morano, all of Hull; two sis- 
ters, Mary Caparrotta of Hull 
and Margaret Tutay of San 
Diego, Calif.; three grand- 
children and several nieces 
and nephews. 

He was the brother of the 
late Maria LaRosa and John 
Morano. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to South Shore Elder Ser- 
vice, Meal on Wheels, 639 



A funeral service for 
Charles N. "Costa" Kapolis, 
74, of Brockton, formerly of 
Quincy, was held Monday at 
St. Catherine Greek Ortho- 
dox Church. 

Mr. Kapolis died July 20 
at the Good Samaritan Medi- 
cal Center in Brockton. 

Mr. Kapolis was a man- 
ager for 10 years at the 
George H. Dean Co. in South 
Boston. He retired in 1989. 

He formerly worked at 
Rustcraft in Dedham for 25 
years. 

Bom in Boston, he lived 
in Brockton for the past five 
years. He previously lived in 
the Squantum section of 
Quincy. 

He served in the Navy 
during World War {I. 

Husband of the late Mary 
(Gold) Kapolis, he is sur- 
vived by two sons, Alexander 
Kapolis of Holbrook and 



Representatives and the Granite St., ifaintree 02 184. 



John Dennis Johnston, 74 

Former Dispatcher For White Fuel Company 



A funeral Mass for John 
Dennis Johnston, 74, of 
Quincy, a dispatcher, will be 
celebrated at a later date in 
Woodstock, New 

Brunswick, Canada. 

Mr. Johnston died July 20 
at the Beth Israel Deaconess 
Hospital in Boston after a 
brief illness. 

Mr. Johnston was a dis- 
patcher for 20 years at the 
White Fuel Company in 
South Boston and retired in 
1994. He also worked for the 
Quincy Oil Company for 20 



years. 

He attended Canada 
schools and was born in 
Newberg, New Brunswick, 
Canada. 

Mr. Johnston came to the 
United States in 1948 and 
lived in Quincy for 52 years. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Mary C. (Keenan) Johnston; 
two sons, Kevin John 
Johnston of Boston and 
David Edmund Johnston of 
Chicago; a daughter, Julie 
Ann Johnston of Quincy; a 
brother, Clarence J. Johnston 



of Fredericton, New 
Brunswick, Canada; a grand- 
child; and many nieces and 
nephews. 

Burial will be in Newberg 
Cemetery, Newberg, New 
Brunswick, Canada. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney Broth- 
ers Home for Funerals, I In- 
dependence Ave., Quincy 
Center. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Cancer So- 
ciety, 30 Speen St., 
Framingham 01710. 




iP9" 



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June 5, 2000 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 2000-1 86 
ORDERED: 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy, that the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Quincy, 1 993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 
In Title 10: Vehicles & Traffic. Chapter 10.32, One Way Streets-Designated. 



ADD THE FOLLOWING: 



S TREET 

Columbia St. 



Eastbound 



FROM 

90 ft. east 
ofTaberSt. 



m 

300 ft. east 
OfTaberSt. 



REGULATION 

One-Way 



7/27/00 



PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 19, 2000 

ATTEST Joseph P. Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED JULY 12, 2000 

James A. Sheets 

MAYOR 

A true copy. 

Attest: Maureen L. Hallsen, Assistant City Clerk 



June 5, 2000 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 2000-187 
ORDERED: 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy, that the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Quincy, 1 993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Title 10, Chapter 10.08, Section 10.08.300 Turning Movements-Restricted Where: 



ADD THE FOLLOWING: 



STREET 

Plain Street 



DIRECTION 

Westbound 



AT TYPE OF REGULATION 

Liberty Street No Right Turn 

4PM to 7PM Weekdays 

PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 1 9, 2000 

ATTEST Joseph P Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED JULY 12, 2000 

James A. Sheets 

MAYOR 

A tme copy. 

Attest: Maureen L. Hallsen, Assistant City Cleri< 



James Kapolis of Milton; a 
daughter, Maryann Rae of 
Brockton; seven grandchil- 
dren and five great-grand- 
children. 

He was the father of the 
late George Kapolis. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery, West Quincy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 

Donations may be made 
to the St. Catherine's Greek 
Orthodox Church Building 
Fund, 157 Beale St., Quincy 
02170. 



A funeral service for 
Alfred R. Kemp, 80. of 
Quincy, a retired employee 
of Brockway Smith Supplies 
in Andover, was officiated 
July 22 by Rev. Richard 
Brondyke at Ashley Funeral 
Home, 35 Oak St., 
Middleboro. 

Mr. Kemp died July 19 at 
home after a long illness. 

Mr. Kemp retired in 1983. 

He was a member of Four 
Square Presbyterian Church, 
Quincy. 

He served in World War 
II as a machinist mate 3rd 
class in the Navy Seabees 
construction battalion. 



Bom in West Milbury, he 
graduated from Quincy High 
School in 1937. 

He is survived by his wife 
of 54 years, Barbara S. (Piper) 
Kemp; two sons, Alan R. 
Kemp of Middleboro and 
Douglas W. Kemp of Dover, 
NH; a daughter, Beverly J. 
TrewhcllaorBumlhills, NY; 
and seven grandchildren. 

Burial was in South 
Middleboro Cemetery. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Parkinson's 
Disease Association, 720 
Harrison Ave., Suite 707, 
Boston 02188. 





April 18, 2000 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 2000-130 
ORDERED: 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy, that the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Quincy, 1993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Title 10: Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10.20. Stopping, Standing & Parking. Section 
10:20:40 Parking prohibited and restricted where. A list of specific locations where pari<ing is 
prohibited or restricted in on file in the office of the City Clerk: 

ADD JHE FOLLOWING: 

Do Not Enter Common Street at Quarry Street towards Copeland Street 7-9 AM & 4- 
ZRM 

PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 19, 2000 

ATTEST Joseph P. Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED JULY 12, 2000 

James A. Sheets 

MAYOR 

A true copy. 

Attest: Maureen L. Hallsen, Assistant City Clerk 



7/27/00 






CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 2000-178 June 5, 2000 

ORDERED: 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy, that the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Quincy, 1 993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 
In Title 10: Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10.12.040 Stop Signs-Authorized where. 



ADD THE FOLLOWING: 



SIBEEI 

Mollis Ave. 
Mollis Ave. 



AT 

Newbury Ave. 
Newbury Ave. 



PIReCWN 

Facing East 
Facing West 



TYPE OF REGULATION 

STOP 
STOP 



PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 19, 2000 

ATTEST Joseph P Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVEDJULY12,2000 

James A. Sheets 

MAYOR 

A true copy. 

Attest: Maureen L. Hallsen, Assistant City Clerk 



7/27/00 



LEGAL NOTICE 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 2000-179 June 5, 2000 

ORDERED: 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy, that the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Quincy, 1993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Title 10: Vehicles & Traffic. Chapter 10.20 Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 
10.20.40 Parking prohibited and restricted where: A list of specific locations where parking is 
prohibited or restricted is on file in the office of the City Clerk: 



ADD THE FOLLOWING: 
STREET SIDE 

Edwards St. South 

Edwards St. North 

Union St. East 



FROM IQ TYPE OF REGULATION 

Union St. 40' West No Parking 

Union St. 30' West No Periling 

Edwards St. 40" South No Parking 

' PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 19, 2000 

ATTEST: Joseph P Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED JULY 12, 2000 

James A. Sheets 

MAYOR 

A tme copy. 

Attest: Maureen L. Hallsen, Assistant City Clerk 



7/27/00 



7/27/00 



Page 24 Tl&e Qulncy Sun Thursday, July 27, 2000 







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KING CROSSWORD 



Trivia Test by Fifi Rodriguez 



Salome's Stars 



ACROSS 


successor 


baseball 


1 With It, once 


39 Succor 


11 Mole, e.gjr- 


4 Diva's song 


40 Jima 


16 Firetruck 


8 Droops 


preceder 


props 


12 Liston 


41 Trattoria 


20 Manhandle 


vanquisher 


seafood 


23 Parka part 


13 Easter 


entree 


24 "— each life 


entree 


45 Poker 


n 


14 Witticism 


holding 


25 In two shakes 


15 Mrs. 


48 Battle on 


26 Scoff at 


Shalcespeare, 


stage? 


27 Pearl 


nee — 


50 Between 


Mosque 


17 Homely 


assignments 


dty 


18 Tennis 


51 FalcoofThe 


28 Castle 


invitee? 


Sopranos" 


protection 


19 Fat fami 


52 Send out 


29 Rapture 


21 Letter 


Invitations 


32 Touched 


o0bner 


53 Prospector's 


soothingly 


22 "Misty- 


pnze 


33 Hero's 


singer 


54 Bruce 


award 


26 "Turn of the 


or Laura 


35 Do 


Saew" 


55 Tamper (with) 


suturing 


writer 




36 Fungus-alga 


29 Mandible 


DOWN 


merger 


30 Lennon's 


1 "Thafs funny" 


38 Put on the 


tady 


2 Verve 


payroll 


31 Teamwork 


3 Sympathy 


39 Moving 


obstacles 


4 Rocker 


about 


32 tmpress'io 


Morissette 


42 Vegan's no-no 


Hurok 


5 Less 


43 Mexican 


33 Marquand 


civilized 


currency 


sleuth 


6 '— Believer" 


44 Black 


34 Precambrian, 


7 Immeasurably 


45 Babe, 


for one 


bad 


eg 


35 Pigs' digs 


8 Crouch 


46 Commotion 


36 Deceived 


9 Calendar abbr. 47 Sick 


37 Cronkite's 


10 Hodges of 


49 Citric quaff 



1. MATH: What is the Roman numeral for the Arabic 
number 400? 

2. SPORTS: In what sport would you perform a maneu- 
ver called the veronica? 

3. HISTORY: Who defeated Napoleon at Waterloo? 

4. MUSIC: What does die musical term "con bravura" 
mean? 

5. LANGUAGE: In Arabic, what is the country of 
Morocco called? 

6. INVENTIONS: What common drug was introduced to 
the world by Hermann Dresser? 

7. MEASUREMENTS: In the metric system, what is the 
basic unit of heat? 

8. MOVIES: What did the dwarfs do for a living in 
"Snow White and die Seven Dwarfs"? ' 

9. GEOGRAPHY: Which nation has a major wine-pro- 
ducing region called Adelaide Hills? 

10. RELIGION: In die Bible, how long was Jonah in die 
belly of die great fish? 



TRIVIA ANSWERS 



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^_^ 



ANSWERS TO CROSSWORD 



HOCUS-FOCUS 



BY 
HENRY BOLTINOPF 




Find at least six diffennces in details between panels. 

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1. The Perfect Storm 

(PG-13) George Clooncy, 
Mark Wahlberg 

2. The Patriot (R) Mel 
Gibson 

3. Chicken Run (G) feat, 
the voice of Mel Gibson 

4. Me, Myself and Irene 
(R) Jim Carrey 

5. The Adventures of 
Rocky and Bullwinkle 
(PG) Feat. The voice of 
Rene Russo, Robert DeNiro 



and Jason Alexander 

6. Shaft (R) Samuel L. 
Jackson 

7. Big Momma's House 
(PG-13) Martin Lawrence 

8. Gone In Sixty Sec- 
onds (PG-13) Nicholas 
Cage 

9. Mission: Impossible 2 
(PG-13) Tom Cruise 

10. Gladiator (R) Rus- 
sell Crowe 



ARIES (March 21 to 
April 19) You face the possi- 
bility of raising your rela- 
tionship to another level. 
However, mxa partner might 
demand mat you make 
promises for which you're 
not sure you're ready. 

TAURUS (April 20 to 
May 20) As changes contin- 
ue, expect things to get a lit- 
tie more hectic at your work- 
place. An unexpected travel 
opportunity could open new 
career prospects. 

GEMINI (May 21 to June 
20) Confront the person who 
caused your hurt feelings, 
and demand a full explana- 
tion for his or her actions. 
You'll not only recover your 
self-esteem, but you'll also 
gain the respect of otho^. 

CANCER (June 21to July 
22) That personal problem in 
die workplace is compound- 
ed by someone's biased int»-- 
feraice. Stand your ground, 
and you'll soon find allies 
gadiering around you. 

LEO (July 23 to August 
22) You don't accept disap- 
proval easily. But instead of 
hiding out in your den to lick 
your wounded pride, turn die 
criticism into a valuable les- 
son for future use. 

VIRGO (August 23 to 
September 22) That foiracr 
friend you thought you'd cut 
out of your life is still affect- 
ing other relationships. 
Counto- his or her lies with 
the truth. Your friends are 
ready to listen. 

LIBRA (September 23 to 
October 22) V/hat appears to 
l)e an unfair situation mi^t 
simply be the result of a mis- 



understanding. If you feel 
something is out of balance, 
by all means, correct it. 

SCORPIO (October 23 to 
Noven*CT 21) A stalled rela- 
tionship won't budge until 
yoa make the first move. Your 
partner offers a surprising 
ejqilanation about what got it 
mired down in die first place. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov- 
ember 22 to December 21) A 
co-woricCT shares some star- 
ding news, but before you can 
use it to your advantage, 
make sure it's true. The week- 
end favors family matto^. 

CAPRICORN (Decem- 
ber 22 to January 19) Your 
usual conservative a^qiroach 
to family situations might 
not work at diis time. Keep 
an open mind about develop- 
ments, and you might be 
pleasantiy surprised. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 
to Febniary 18) Plans might 
have to be put on hold be- 
cause of a funily maaber's 
IHoblems. Don't Iwsitate to 
get involved. Your help coukl 
make all die differoice. 

PISCES (February 19 to 
March 20) Relationships in 
die home and in die work- 
place need your careful attri- 
tion during this period. Be 
careful not to allow misunder- 
standings to create proMons. 

YOU WERE BORN 
THIS WEEK: You have a 
keoi, insightful intellect and 
enjoy debating your views 
with others who disagree 
widi you. You also love to 
solve puzzles — die harder, 
the better. 

O 2000 King Features Synd., Inc. 



Wishing m 


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HERE IS A PLEASANT LITTLE GAME that wiN give you a 
message every day. Ifs a numencal puzzle designed to spefl 
oiX your fortune. Count the letters ki your first name. If the 
number of letters is6or more, subtract 4. If the number is less 
than 6, add 3. The resiA is your key number. Startattheup^ 
per left-hand comer and check one of your key numbers, left 
to right. Then read the message the letters under the 
checked figures give you. 



ffA\r> 



'V.^ 



Thursday, July 27, 2000 Tbe Quincy Sun Page 25 




April 18, 2000 



CITYOFQUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 2000-125 
ORDERED: 

Be It ordained by the City Council, that the Quincy Municipal Code is hereby amended as 
follo\^: 

In Title 10: Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10.20 Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 
10.20.040 Parking-Prohibited and Restricted where. 

ADD THE FOLLOWING: 

SmEEI SID£ 

Prospect Ave. East 



FROM 


TO TYPE OF REGULATION 


Marion St. 


54'-0 ft. Handicapped 


34*-0ft.in 


in Parking 


southern 


southern 


direction 


direction 



7/27/00 



PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 1 9, 2000 

ATTEST: Joseph P Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED JULY 12, 2000 

James A. Sheets 

MAYOR 

A true copy. 

Attest: Maureen L. Hallsen, /Assistant City Clerk 




April 18. 2000 



CITYOFQUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 2000-128 
ORDERED: 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy, that the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Quincy, 1 993. as amended, be further amended as follows: 
. In Title 1 0: Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 1 0.32, One Way Streets-Designated. 



ADD THE FOLLOWING: 

SIBEEI OBEOm^ 


FROM 

E. Squantum 
Street 


m 

Quincy 
Shore Drive 


REGULATION 


DItmar St. Northbound 


One-way 



7727/00 



PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 1 9. 2000 

ATTEST: Joseph P Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED JULY 12. 2000 

James A. Sheets 

MAYOR 

A true copy. 

Attest: Maureen L. Hallsen, Assistant City Clerk 



May 1,2000 



CITYOFQUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 2000-143 
ORDERED: 

Be it ordained by the City Council, that the Quincy Municipal Code is hereby amended as 
follows: 

In Title 10: Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10.20 Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 
1 0.20.040 Parking-Prohibited and Restricted where. 



ADD THE FOLLOWING: 

SIBEEI SIDE 

Wlllard St. West 



FROM 


7D TYPE OF REGULATION 


102'-0 


122'-0 Handicapped 


North of 


North of Parking 


Robertson St. 


Robertson St. 



PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 19. 2000 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED JULY 12. 2000 

James A. Sheets 

MAYOR 

A true copy. 

Attest: Maureen L. Hallsen, Assistant City Clerk 



7/27/00 




CITYOFQUINCY 

IN COUNCIL , 

ORDER NO. 2000-144 May 1,2000 

ORDERED: 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy, that the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Quincy, 1993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Title 10: Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10.20. Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 
1 0.20.40 Parking prohibited and restricted where: A list of specific locations where parking is 
prohibited or restricted is on file in the office of the City Clerk. 



ADD THE FOLLOWING: 
$TR EET SIDE* 

Liberty St. West 



FROM m TYPE OF REGULATION 

Water St. 461 '-0 No Parl<ing 

361 '-0 on Liberty St. 

Southerly Southerly 

Direction Direction 

PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 19, 2000 

ATTEST: Joseph P Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED JULY 1 2, 2000 

James A. Sheets 

MAYOR 

A true copy. 

Attest: Maureen L. Hallsen, Assistant City Clerk 



7/27/00 



V - 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 2000-173 June 5. 2000 

ORDERED: 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy, that the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Quincy, 1993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 
In Title 10: Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10.12.040 Stop Signs-Authorized where. 



ADD THE FPU OWING- 
S TR E ET AT 
Forum Rd. Hardwick Rd. 



DIRECTI ON 

Southbound 



JBEGULA VON 

STOP 



7/27/00 



PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 19, 2000 

ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED JULY 12, 2000 

James A. Sheets 

MAYOR 

A tme copy. 

Attest: Maureen L. Hallsen, Assistant City Clerk 




CITYOFQUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 2000-1 74 June 5, 2000 

ORDERED: 

Be it ordained by the City Council, ttiat the Quincy Municipal Code is hereby amended as 
foltows: 

In Title 10: Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10.20 Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 
10.20.040 Parking-Prohibited and Restricted where. 



ADD THE FOLLOWING: 

SIBEEI SIDE 

Freeman St. East 



7/27/00 



FROM m T YP E OF R EGULATION 

483'-0. 503'-0 Handicapped 

South of South of Paricing 

Billings Road Billings Road 

PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 1 9, 2000 

ATTEST Joseph P. Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED JULY 12, 2000 

James A. Sheets 

MAYOR 

A true copy. 

Attest: Maureen L. Hallsen, Assistant City Clerk 




CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 2000-176 June 5, 2000 

ORDERED: 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy, that the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Quincy, 1993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Title 10: Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10.20 Stopping, Standing and Partying. Section 
1 0.20.40 Partdng prohibited and restricted where: A list of specific locations vi^ere paridng is 
prohibited or restricted is on file In the office of the City Cleric. 



ADD THE FOLLOWING: 

STREET SIDE 

Bums Ave. West 



Bums Ave. 



East 



FROM m TYPE OF RE GULATION 

Quincy Ave. 45' North NoParidng 

of Quincy Ave. 
Quincy Ave. 155' North NoPartcing 

of Quincy Ave. 
PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 1 9, 2000 
ATTEST Joseph P. Shea 
CLERK OF COUNCIL 
APPROVED JULY 1 2, 2000 
James A. Sheets 
MAYOR 
A true copy. 
Attest: Maureen L. Hallsen. Assistant City Cleric 



7/27/00 



June 5, 2000 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 2000-177 
ORDERED: 

Be It ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy, that the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Quincy, 1993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 
In Title 10: Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10.12.040 Stop Signs-Authorized where. 



ADD THE FOLLOWING: 



STREET 

Standlsh Rd. 
Standlsh Rd. 



AI 

Huckins Ave. 
Hucklns Ave. 



DIRECTION 

Facing North 
Facing South 



TYPE OF REGULATION 

STOP 
STOP 



PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 19, 2000 

ATTEST Joseph P Shea 

CLERK OF COUNCIL 

APPROVED JULY 1 2, 2000 

James A. Sheets 

MAYOR 

A true copy. 

Attest: Maureen L. Hallsen, Assistant City Cleric 



7/27/00 



tm^mi 



"•tSV%''-t'ft*^^»'*8"*»J'****"*"*'*'** '* -"• ' 



Page 26 Tbe Quinoy Suxi Thursday, July 27, 2000 



v»' 




INVITATION TO BID 

The Department of Public Works for the City of Quincy, 
Massachusetts will receive sealed bids for Area 7 Street 
Resurfacing & Improvements Contract until 10:00 AM local 
time August 10, 2000 in the offices of the Commissioner of 
Public Works, 55 Sea Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 02169, 
at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and 
read aloud. 

The work under this contract consists of: excavation of 
bituminous concrete, including reclamation, removal and 
installation of new travelways, new cement/bituminous side- 
walks, granite curbing, cutting of tree roots, removal of tree 
stumps, minor landscaping, minor drainage improvements, 
new road striping, and other related works. 

A non-refundable deposit of $50.00 in cash or check 
payable to the City of Quincy shall be required for each set of 
Contract Documents. Bidders requesting Contract Docu- 
ments by mail shall also include an additional non-refund- 
able mail fee of $10.00 in cash or check payable to the City 
of Quincy. 

The Contract Documents may be obtained during the 
business hours of 9.00 AM and 5:00 PM at the offices of the 
Commissioner of Public Works, Engineering Division , 55 Sea 
Street, Quincy, MA 02169 on or after July 26, 2000. 

Each bid shall be accompanied by a bid security in the 
amount of five percent (5%) of the total value of the bid in the 
form of bid bond or certified/treasurer's check. The bidding 
and award of this contract shall be in full compliance with 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 30, Section 39M, as 
last revised. All Federal, State and City of Quincy regulations 
in relation to Minority Business Enterprise, Women's Busi- 
ness Enterprise, Minority Work Force, Equal Employment 
Opportunity, Employment of Quincy Residents and Minimum 
Wage Rates shall be complied with. 

The City resen/es the right to waive any informality in or to 
reject any or ail Bids when such an action is deemed in the 
best interests of the City. Non-responsive and/or unbal- 
anced bids may be rejected. 

James A. Sheets David A. Colton 

Mayor Commissioner of Public Wori<s 

7/27/00 




COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket 0OP1103EP 

In the Estate of 

MARY E. HARKINS 

Ute Of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE OF PETITION 
FOR PROBATE OF WILL 
To all persons interested 
in the above captioned es- 
tate, a petition has been pre- 
sented praying that the last 
will of said decedent be 
proved and allowed, and that 
ELAINE BEGGAN Of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed ex- 
ecutor, named in the will to 
sen/e without surety. 

IF YOU DESIRE TO OB- 
JECT THERETO, YOU OR 
YOUR ATTORNEY MUST 
FILE A WRITTEN APPEAR- 
ANCE IN SAID COURT AT 
NORFOLK ON OR BEFORE 
TEN O'CLOCK IN THE 
FORENOON ( 1 0:00 AM) ON 
August 23, 2000. 

In addition, you must file a 
written affidavit of objections 
to the petition, stating spe- 
cific facts and grounds upon 
which the objection is based, 
within thirty (30) days after 
the retum day (or such other 
time as this court, on motion 
with notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

WITNESS, Hon. David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First Jus- 
tice of said Court at NOR- 
FOLK this day, July 1 1 , 2000. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/27/00 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket 86P2003GI 

Notice Of Fiduciary's 
Account 

To all persons interested 
in the estate of Mary A. Burr 
of Quincy, in the county of 
Norfolk. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rule 72 that the First and 
Final account of John R. Burr 
as Guardian (the fiduciary) 
of the property of said Mary 
A. Burr has been presented 
to said Court for allowance. 
If you desire to preserve 
your right to file an objection 
to said account, you or your 
attomey must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before the six- 
teenth day of August, 2000, 
the return day of this citation. 
You may upon written re- 
quest by registered or certi- 
fied mail to the fiduciary, or to 
the attorney for the fiduciary, 
obtain without cost a copy of 
said account. If you desire to 
object to any item of said 
account, you must, in addi- 
tion to filing a written appear- 
ance as aforesaid, file within 
thirty days after said return 
day or within such other time 
as the Court upon motion 
may order a written state- 
ment of each such item to- 
gether with the grounds for 
each objection thereto, a 
copy to be served upon the 
fiduciary pursuant to Mass. 
R. Civ. P. Rule 5. 

WITNESS, David H. 
Kopelman, Esquire, First Jus- 
tice of said Court at Dedham 
this fifth day of July, 2000. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

7/27/2000 



Classifieds & Lcgils 



Jui^fu. 



■ r (i.it[hwAli&fii^M 




JOBS - JOBS - JOBS - JOBS - JOBS 



Administrative Assistants 

Banldng - Tellers, 

Customer Service 

Call Center Manager 

Customer Service 

Associates 

Data Entry Clerks 

Evening Supervisors 

Sr. International Specialist 

New Business Assistants 




smwm 



Spedalbtlnfl In Swvica Staffing 

New Jobs Posted Weekly 

Join our Team Today 
& Experience the Oifferencel 

Call for an appointment or walk In 

(we are directly across from the Quincy Center T) 

1212 Hancock Street, #101, Quincy 

617-472-9009, Fax 617-472-1991 

email: csrsolutions@msn.com 7/27 



HELP WANTED 

Experienced Weekend Grill Cook 

able to handle high volume, 

fast paced work environment. 

Seniors and retirees welcome. 



Send resume to: 

Early American Restaurant 

1054 Hancock Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

Attn: l\/lanager 

or call 

(617)328-8225 



7/27 



BE A NEWSCARRIER! 
Call The Quincy Sun 471-3100 




INVITATION TO BID 

The Department of Public Works for the City of Quincy, 
Massachusetts will receive sealed bids for Densmore Street 
Reconstruction Contract until 1 0:00 AM local time August 9, 
2000 in the offices of the Commissioner of Public Works, 55 
Sea Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 021 69, at which time and 
place all bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. 

The work under this contract consists of: excavation of 
bituminous concrete travelway and sidewalks, installation of 
new gravel sub-base and new bituminous concrete base, 
leveling and top courses, installation of new granite curbing 
and bituminous concrete sidewalks and wheelchair ramps, 
installation of 4-inch yellow refiectorized themnoplastic strip- 
ing; drainage improvements, including installation of catch 
basins and drainage manholes and all work incidental thereto. 
All work under this contract shall be completed within 60 
calendar days. 

A non-refundable deposit of $50.00 in cash or check 
payable to the City of Quincy shall be required for each set of 
Contract Documents. Bidders requesting Contract Docu- 
ments by mail shall also include an additional non-refund- 
able mail fee of $10.00 in cash or check payable to the City 
of Quincy. 

The Contract Documents may be obtained during the 
business hours of 8:30 AM and 4:30 PM at the offices of the 
Commissioner of Public Works, Engineering Division, 55 Sea 
Street, Quincy, MA 02169 on or after July 26, 2000. 

Each bid shall be accompanied by a bid security in the 
amount of five percent (5%) of the total value of the bid in the 
fonm of bid bond or certified/treasurer's check. 

The bidding and award of this contract shall be in full 
compliance with Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 30, 
Section 39M, as last revised. 

All Federal, State and City of Quincy regulations in relation 
to Minority Business Enterprise, Women's Business Enter- 
prise, Minority Wori< Force, Equal Employment Opportunity, 
Employment of Quincy Residents and Minimum Wage Rates 
shall be complied with. 

The City reserves the right to waive any informality in or to 
reject any or all Bids when such an action is deemed in the 
best interests of the City. Non-responsive and/or uni)al- 
ancad bids m ay ba refected. 

Janr>es A. Sheets Davkl A. Colton 

Mayor Commissioner of Publk: Works 

7/27/00 



!ftll1ttD 



Financial Services i£;^sS?sKi 

^.^ Adviun into At worid's 

Operations tS^ST^JSTS. 

Oppoktunities l^^^ns,'Z 

open minds. 

Securities Operations Services 
Associates -Quincy, MA ^Mv^fmaMmMmi 

\Mthm Private AsMt Management, there am sevwal poeHions open in the 
Operatkms Support Unit, including: 

ThMteSetdementSpedaHirt Income Collection Spedaliat 

Mani^ieincnt Accountant 
Corporate Action Spedaliat 



Secnritiea Maintenance 
Specialist 



The ideal (»ndklates wfl have knowtodge of sacurilieB prooeeaing, trwie 
eupport eettlement. coqxNvte action proceaaing, inoome ooliection, and 
the aecuritiea maalerfye needed to work with DTC, FED, and other 
depository and custodial intsrfocea. Strong reconciKailnn and problem 
resolution skills, and the abitty to work wel under preseure are 
neceasaiy. 

SSgA provkles oonipetitive salaries and generous benefits. Wb also 
befieve in a strong wori(/life t)alance. Al this and the opportunity to grow 
with one of the most Mluential financial servkse leaders in the worid. K 
interested, please send your resume with salary requirements to: 



Human Resources. Dept BH/QS, 
State Street GlotMd Advisors, 
IWo IntamatJonal Place, Boston, 
MA 02110, or emaH your resume. 
inchKflng department code noted 
alMve, to: iobsbhOssga.com. 

An equal opportunity empk>yer. 



SSfA. 



SaoE SntEET Global ADVISORS 




R.eM.NIONS • PAR.T1&S • FlBSTAS 



3 

z 

en 




<>. T 42*' 

e. MtltoiA,, MA 021ff6> 

ret: b^2-(>^oo 






^ NOW HHR.I N^ ^ 
ALU P03mON3 
4^ - 4^0 -per hour 

Co; B.eN6FIT3 .e^ 



Hf^ 



>^^ 



,<o^ 



Stv^st of Huvvior K£e\uircd 
CORPORAre CATFRJ N<q 



z 

i 
i 

s 



51 




SEWING: Can you really 
sew? Do you know what a 
pattern repeat is? Do you 
know the difference be- 
tween a seam and a sel- 
vage? Work in a creative, 
stimulating environment. If 
you are good $10/hour. 
CaJI Judy 
(617)825-4511 



m 






RAIN OR SHINE 

across 

61 Princess Eve Dr 

Wollaston 

Aug. 4-5-6 im 



GIANT YARD SALE 
July 29th, 8'2pm. 

Rain or shine 

65 Newbury Ave., North Quincy 

Lots of good items, 

weight equip., etc. im 



SONSHINE 

PRESCHOOL 

OPEN REGISTRATION 

FOR BOYS & GIRLS 

AGES3&4 

Meets Mon-Fri, Sept-May 

Morning or afternoons 

Call 472-2345 for info or 

sign up at the 

Salvation Army 

(comer of Elm & 

Baxter Sts.), Quincy tf 



YARDMAN LAWN 

TRACTOR 

11 HP ENGINE, 38" CUT, 

DUAL REAR BAGGER, 

NEW BATTERY $395.00 

(617)328-9136 im 



BIKES FOR SALE 

Mens red Magna, 

10spd.,$100 

Womens green Columbia, 

3 spd. $50' 

Call 617-773-2495 mi 




The Salvation Army 

helping the community 

and your neighbors. 

Give what you can to 

support their efforts 

6 Baxter St., Quincy im 



Thank You 
St Jude 

for prayers answered. 



OP. 7«7 






. % 4 % m ' 






.«* t*» .T .T *• 



Thursday, July 27, 2000 The Qttlaicy Siin Page 27 



& Lega I s 



f9^^^^^>WtkJhM!mim^i^ssMMkmlH^KKmwSKmB^m^mikX-,-A- s.%.**MJ!!!L,JSlKtmSKm WmmBBmBZmSmmjMc^^^SmmBBKKmM 9KKKmt^iiKt^irMjlt«Sm,rAiJIKHmSim 



%'^i'WPJI; W\ W^Htfff$^^^lf^y': 



A NEW HALL 

Elks Lane, off 254 Quarry St. 

For Weddings, Showers, 

Meetings and Banquets. 

QUINCY ELKS 

847-6149 



TF 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy 
K of C Building 

5 Mollis Avenue 

For Information Please Call 

767-0519 



HAND TOOLS WANTED 

Wood or steel planes. Also, 
chisels, clamps, tool chests, 
old hdndtools, all trades (ma- 
chinist, pattern maker, watch- 
maker, etc.) shop lots. Also, 
antiquarian books, frames, 
paintings, crocks, lanterns. 
Antiques in estate lots. 
1-617-558-3839 




TF 



The Bryan Room VFW 

24 Broad St., Quincy 

2 newly renovated 
function halls available. 

Large room 400+ 
small room 150 guests. 

1-800-474-6234 tf 



It's Wise to use someone 

who knows their business, 

if you l<now what I mean. 

Remerica Francis-Netties Real 

Estate l<nows their business. 

617-472-1600. CaH us! mi 







HERITAGE HALL 

American Legion Post #114 
Weddings, Meetings, All 

Occasions 

114 Granite Ave., Milton 

617-696-3836 



TF 



STORE 
FOR RENT 

• 

450 sq. ft., office 
or small business 

$550/mo. 

N. Quincy 

Call 

781-289-2415 a. 



TS J>^ ^^l'^'J^^ 



Prayer and understanding of 
God, also called Spirit, Truth, 
Mind, Soul and Love in the 
Bible, brings us into natural 
health as we realize our own 
native spirituality. Anyone can 
be helped in prayer and heal- 
ing - phone Finn (617) 448- 
1053, 6-7am, 8- 10pm or week- 
ends. 



95 Ford Taurus Wag 

70k $6995 

95 Mercury Sable 

84k $6995 

95 Dodge Caravan 

72k $6995 

94 Cadillac Sedan DeVille 

85k $11,999 

94 Olds 88 Royal 

74k $7995 

94 Jeep Wrangler 

76k $9995 

93 T-Bird Super Cpe. 

76k, 5 spd. $6995 

93 Jeep Cherokee 

81k, 4x4 $8995 

93 Isusu Rodeo 

80k $7995 
92 Jaguar Coupe 

$12,900 

South Street Auto Sales 

577 South Street 

Quincy, MA 
617-773-5642 mi 



Quincy Bobcat 

Services & 

Construction Supply 

Loader, Backhoe, 

Yard Rake 

Dump Truck 

Equipment Transport 

617-479-8852 
781-834-1229 



8/17 



Wallpaper and Painting 

hy the Paperboy 

Gerard Shea 

Graduate of US School of Profes- 
sional Paper Hanging, Rutland, VT 
617-471-5089 



Roman Electric 

Residential, Commercied, Alarm Systems,. 
AC Instiillations, Fast Response, Free 
Estiimtes. Fully insured. Lie #37566. 
7$1-601-6302 or 1 -877-41 -ROMAN 

visit us at www.Ron)anelectric.net tf 



Mo's Auto Service 

We come to you fast response. 
Free Estimates. No job too small. 
Quality work done at reasonable 
rates. 

8 37 - 7172 



MCL 



-mt- 



H & M CLEANERS 

Professronal Cleaners 
Your Home Office & Restaurant 
For Free Estimates call 
Helena (781) 871-1552 
Martes(781)681-9122 9/7 



PETE'S CLEANING COMPANY 
Commercial Cleaning 

Specializing in: 

Reflnishing Floors, Carpet 

Cleaning, Upholstery 

617-472-2772, fax: 617-770-9116 

Bonded & Insured 9/28 



Precision Heating & Air Conditioning 

The One Stop Service Company 

We Sen/ice & Install 

• Oil/Gas Heating Systems • Oil/Gas Water Heaters 

• Oil/Gas Burners • Residential Air Conditioning 

• Oil Tanks Removed & Replaced 

Service . . . It's Our Only Business tf 

Annual Tune Ups $70, includes nozzle & oil filter 
617-472-8641 24 hour Emerc^ncy Service Jerry LaFlamme 



Timothy J. O'Brien 

Building & 

Remodeling 

Decks, Dormers, 

Additions, Siding, 

Windows, Repairs 

479-6685 

Licensed, Insured 
Free Estimates 

MA Reg. #116180 



TF 



No problem 
P.B. CONSTRUCTION 

Painting & Carpentry 
Replacement Windows 
617-967-6220 Lie & Ins. 

Ask for Paul Burke 7/2? 



Lawford Plumbing 

Small Jobs • Faucet 
• Toilet & Heat Repairs 

• Drain Cleaning 

• Garbage Disposals 

Installed 

24 Hour Service. 

Master Lie. #7306 

781-849-6184 9^ 




7/27 



SAVE GAS AND 

MONEY... 
SHOP LOCALLY 



CPR and First Aid 
Instruction 

Soutti Shore Area 
class size 6 to 8 
(617)471-2417 



10/19 



WINDOW WASH 

Please call 
328-4819 
328-0726 



9/7 




PERSONAL LINES 
CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE 

Are you an experienced P/L GSR? We seek a detail-minded 
individual with a commitment to sen/ice to join our team. 
We offer continuing training, competitive salary and benefits 
package. Full or part time considered. 

Please send resume and references to: 

KATHY CASEY 
BERRY INSURANCE AGENCY 
685 Hancock Street, Quincy, MA 02170 
Fax 617-479-8761 



8/3 



$9.00/HOUR TO START 



RGIS INVENTORY SPECIALISTS IS LOOKING FOR SELF- 
MOTIVATED INDIVIDUALS LOOKING FOR WORK IN A FAST- 
PACED ENVIRONMENTT. 

• NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY 

• RGIS HAS IMMEDIATE OPENINGS FOR INVENTORY 

AUDITORS 
•ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE RIGHT PEOPLE 

• DAY AND NIGHT/WEEKEND POSITIONS AVAILABLE. 
AVERAGE HOURS DEPEND ON YOUR SCHEDULING 
AVAILABILITY. 

• PAID TRAINING FOR QUALIFIED APPLICANTS. 

• MUST BE 18 YEARS OF AGE. 

• WILLING TO WORK IN/AROUND GREATER BOSTON AREA 

• HAVE ACCESS TO TRANSPORTATION. 

• MOST LOCATIONS T ACCESSIBLE. 

CALL THE BOSTON CENTRAL OFFICE AT 
617-484-1788 MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 9AM-4PM 
WE ARE AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 
.RGIS INVENTORY SPECIAUSTS a/31 



FREDRICKSON 
BROTHERS, INC. 

441 WASHINGTON ST., NORWELL, MA 

INTERNATIONAL & HIND TRUCK 

PARTS, SALES & SERVICE 

FISHER SNOWPLOWS-PARTSAND 

INSTALLATIONS 

781-659-2400 m 



POWER WASHING 

Houses - Declis - Walkways 

Stone & Block Walls 

General Cleanup, General 

Maintenance. Also trucks, buses. 

Rich Ryan (B) 617-560-5203 

(H) 471-0761 8/17 



HOUSECLEANER 

Clean by Maria Fatima 

A professional housecleaner 

10 experience 

excellent references 

Call 508-872-2613 8/10 



Les Young's 
Complete Handyman Services 

All ttie Little Things 

Carpentry, Painting, Window 

Repair & Replacement, 

Bathrooms, Tile Work, 

Cabinets/Tops 

617-328-5855 



8/3 



A&T VACUUM 

• $19.95 Overhaul Special 
on any vacuum. 

• Sewing machine repairing 

• VCR repairing and cleaning 

• Sharpening 
(scissors, knives, etc.) 

• Oreck XL Vacuums $249 

• Eiectrolux w/power nozzle $199 

• Used vacuums $45 & up 

27 Beale St., Wollaston 
479-5066 TF 



KEITH'S SERVICES 

Gen Building Maintenance 

Call for all your Interior 

& Exterior needs 

Insured, Quality Workmanship, Great Rates 
617-479-8852 781-254-6769 
781-834-1229 tf 



YARD SERVICES 

LAWNS MOWED, 

RAKING, TRIMMING, 

MULCHING, 

FERTILIZING ETC. 

ODD JOBS 

FREE EST. 

CALL 617-770-4593 

1-800-670-0868 tf 



M&J Residential 
Services 

Interior •Exterior painting, carpen- 
try, gutter services, yardwork & 
roof repair, related handyman ser- 
vices. Free estimates. 
Mike (617) 328-8648 i(vi2 



SEWICES 



Your South Shore 
Headquarters For 
Appliance 
Service 
& Parts 
For All 
Major 
Appliances 




hancock tire 
& appliance 

115 Franklin Street 
South Quincy • 472-1710 



YARD WORK CO. 

• Reliable Lawn 
Mowing Service 

• Expert Bush & Hedge 
Trimming 

• Yard Cleanup 

• Fertilize Lawn 

• Mulch Work 

Experienced ' 
'FREE Estimate 
Call Bill Fielding 
471-6124 TF 



T. Lynch Electric 

Residential, Commerciai 
No job too small. 

Fully insured, lie #39339, 

free estimates 

781-335-4081 s/n 



E & K Construction 

Remodeling, Kitchens & Baths, 
Windows, Finished Work, Gen- 
eral Carpentry & Painting. 

Brendan 617-328-6240 
Derniot 617-787-4924 s/st 



Weddings 

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMES 

Weddings from $998 

James Kazolias 

Ossipee, N.H. 
1-800-322-0454, evenings 7/27 



CARPENTRY 

"It's A Little Job" 
Expensive, NO! 
Your price will fix it right 
617-472-0556 8/31 



O'Meara's 
Painting Co. 

Great Rates 
617-840-4987 



7/13 



FRED'S HANDYMAN 

Looking for small mainte- 
nance work, painting, car- 
pentry, window repairs & re- 
placements. Call Fred 472- 
8778 



8/24 



Sun Classified Ads 
Get Results! 




MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 

RATES 

IWEEK □ $5.50 for one insertion, up to 20 words, 

100 for each additional word. 

3-7 WEEKS □ $5.00 per insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 insertions of 

the same ad, 100 each additional word. 

8-12 WEEKS □ R60perinsertion, up to 20 words, for 8-12 insertions 

of the same ad 100 for each additional word. 



INDEX 

□ Services 

□ For Sale 

□ Autos 

□ Boats 

□ For Rent 

□ Wanted 

□ Help Wanted 

□ Work Wanted 

□ Pets 

□ Lost & Found 

□ Real Estate 
Q Antiques 

□ Flea Markets 

□ Yard Sales 

□ Instruction 

□ Daycare 

□ Personal 

□ Miscellaneous 



13 WEEKS 
OR MORE 



G Enclosed is $ 
weeks in 

COPY: 



□ $4.30 per insertion, up to 20 words, for 1 3 or more 
insertions of the same ad 100 for each additional word. 

for the following ad to run 



NO REFUND WILL BE MADE AT THIS CONTRACT RATE IN THE EVENT OF CANCELLATION. 
DEADLINE: MONDAY, 5:00PM. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMBER IN AD. 



Page 28 T1il« Qitincy Sun Thursday, July 27, 2000 



Quincy Avenue 
Choice For New QHS 



Sidewalk Festival One 
Of The Most Successful 



(Cont'd from Page 1) 
those school plans already 
approved by the state. "It's 
very close to being a real- 
ity," Sheets said of the 90 
percent reimbursement, 
noting that it would be an 
added $20 million in sav- 
ings for Quincy taxpayers. 
"We feel that both of those 
projects are eligible for 90 
percent reimbursement." 

The 90 percent reim- 
bursement could still be 
vetoed by Governor Paul 
Cellucci, but Sheets has 
been told by State Rep. 
Ronald Mariano that there 
are enough votes in both the 
house and senate to override 
any possible veto. 

Sheets called the recon- 
sideration of the school 
plan, with alternative plans 
calling for a new Quincy 
High School on Coddington 
St. and a brand new Central 
Middle school, extremely 
helpful in clarifying what he 
said were some unresolved 



issues, such as what to do 
with the CTE. Said Sheets: 

"I think it's been an ex- 
cellent process. We're 
spending a lot of taxpayer 
dollars and we need to be 
very certain that we are 
making the right decision. 
It's brought four or five is- 
sues to the forefront." 

One of those issues ~ the 
need for more space and 
parking at the Quincy Ave. 
high school site — is par- 
ticularly thorny. Sheets said, 
explaining that the new high 
school was originally de- 
signed for 1,000 students 
but now has bepn modified 
to accommodate 1,400, a 
move which has added at 
least 50,000 square feet to 
the footprint of the building 
and caused playing field and 



parking issues. "We need to 
get at least two more acres 
for that parcel and have to 
resolve the issue of a legal- 
sized baseball and Softball 
Held," the mayor said. 

The extra space. Sheets 
said, might come from 
Faxon Park or nearby prop- 
erties, but he said he was 
happy the plans we're 
moving ahead. 

"Now, the only real 
question is: what do we do 
with (the old) Central?" 
Sheets said, adding that he 
was not in favor of selling 
the property. 

The mayor, as well as 
Commissioner Colton, had 
set an Aug, 1 deadline for a 
decision on the two schools 
so as not to affect construc- 
tion timetables. 



Christopher Brundage 
Graduates From Westfield 

Christopher Bnmdage of lege with a bachelor's de- 
Quincy recently graduated gree in Psychology, 
from Westfield State Col- 



(Cont'dfrom page 2) 
The weather was perfect." 

"It was extremely suc- 
cessful," said Stephen 
Blumberg of Stephen Leigh 
Jewelers. 

"For the first time, wor 
brought out our entire se- 
lection of Chelsea Clocks, 
the same type of clocks that 
were on the tall ships and 
they were received very 
well. 

"There were more up- 
scale customers and they 
bought quality goods. 

"We lucked out with the 
weather. It was perfect. And 
Maralin (Manning) and 
Marie (Watts, her assistant) 
did a wonderful job. All in 
all it was extremely success- 
ful." 

John Mucko of Quinwell 
Travel didn't really take part 
in the business aspects of 
the festival but his booth 
raised money for the care of 
cocker spaniels, who are 
subject to blindness with 
age. 



Turn 



South Shore 
Buick 



UST CHANCE 
SALE ENDS 
7-31-00 . 



^V 



"BRAND NEW" 

2000 BUICK 

LESABRE 



SEEING IS BELIEVING 



^'iS'^^S^.' 



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SEEING IS 
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• Real Cars 
• Real Prices 



2000 LeSabre by Buick 

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america's best selling full size sedan 
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EQUIPMENT: 



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• Anti-l(Klt brakes 

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• Tilt steering 

• Cruise control 

• Remote keyless entry 

• AM-FM cassette 



SA\EO\ERS3100 



$25,193 Orig. list price 

$500 Package discount 

$500 Sell down incentive 

$1000 Factory rebate 

$1 198 South Shore Buick discount 

$3198 Total Savings 

We have 24 specially packaged (no package deviation available) Buick 
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*2 1 ,995 

buick:® isn't it time for a real car? 



BOTTOM LINE 
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FIRST QUALITY USED CARS 

OVER 50 IN STOCK AT ALL TIMES! 



'99 BUICK lESABRE 

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2 to choose. 



'99 CENTURY 

Low mileage, good cond., solid value. 
2 to choose 



'960LD5BMVAM 

Smart (ruck, leaVier, cd, extra dean. 199390. 

WAS $17,900 



'99 OLDS INTRIGUE 

Whte, former daily rental, pw/pl, 
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18,995 M6.700 •'°™M7,250 ^5,995 






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WAS $17,995 



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4 dr., a/c, pw/pl, p.seat. 
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KATHY McLaughlin of west Quincy and sons, Jason 
and Ryan, checked the bargains at the Quincy Center 
Sidewalk Festival while Jillian settled for a little nap. 

(Maralin Manning Photo) 

"We raised a little over got a hell of a lot of interest 

$1,000," he said. "The for the future. The kids were 

weather held up and people screaming, '1 want one for 

were very generous." Christmas.' It was the hit of 

One of the highlights of the sidewalk sale, 
the festival was a demon- "Every year I do excep- 

stration of gasoline-powered tionally well and this year 



model cars put on by Hob- 
bytown. 

"We had the cars running 
on Cliveden Street along- 
side the store," said Rudy 
Tonetti, who operates the 
Hobbytown shop with his 
brother, Rick. "They go 50 
or 60 miles an hour. 

"We sold a lot and we 



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proved to be what I ex- 
pected," said Russell De- 
Meo of Quincy 's Records 
and Tapes. 

"What surprised me was 
that we did two and a half 
times a normal day's busi- 
ness inside the store." 

Charlie Ryder of Ryder's 
Home Decor & More, who 
has "only been in the festi- 
val for 25 years," pro- 
nounced the 30th edition of 
the sidewalk fiesta "very 
well." 

"I've seen better but this 
one was good," he said. 
"It's always good depending 
on how much merchandise I 
put out on the sidewalk. 
This year was exceptional, 
better than last year." 

Likewise, James King of 
J & D Shoe Repair, which 
also sells men's clothing, 
acknowledged that this 
year's sidewalk festival was 
"not too bad. Better than last, 
year." 

It was King's second 
year as a participant. 




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AUGUST 




$1 00,000 Needed 

To Replace These Doors 

~ Page 3 ~ 




WEATHER FORECAST 

Friday: Partly Sunny, Highs 80-85 (r> 
Saturday: Mostly Clear, 800-85 
Sunday: Mostly Clear, 80's 



Tlie Quincy 



Historic Quinc\;'s Hometown Weekly; Newspaper 




VOL. 32 No. 45 



Thursday, August 3, 2000 




Sand Sculptors 

iki 






RYAN MARTIN, Sean Hannon, James Weideman and Matt Martin work on their sand 
castle in the annual Tony's Clam Shop contest at WoUaston Beach. 







NIKKI INGRAM, Robert Harrington and Stacey Jacltson added a model Tall Ship to 
their sand castle during Tony's Clam Shop annual contest at WoUaston Beach. 

(Quincy Sun Photos/Tom Gorman) 



Extra $20 Million 

Good News For 

Schools, Other Needs 



The state's 90 percent 
reimbursement for both the 
construction of the new 
Quincy High School and the 
transformation of the cur- 
rent QHS into the new Cen- 
tral Middle School is good 
news for the Quincy tax- 
payer, said Mayor James 
Sheets. 

And the expected $20 
million in savings, the 
mayor said, wUl relieve 
some of the anticipated bur- 
den for property and busi- 



ness owners while at the 
same time allowing the city 
to address some of the new 
issues which have arisen in 
the two ambitious school 
building projects. 

"This (the state's deci- 
sion) reduces the property 
tax burden because it re- 
duces the amount necessary 
to pay for bonding issues," 
the mayor explained, adding 
that he has instructed Audi- 
tor Michael McFarland to 
factor in the 90 percent re- 



imbursement amounts and 
report back to him next 
week. 

The State Legislature 
recently passed an amend- 
ment removing racial equity 
considerations from reim- 
bursement decisions and 
allowing communities with 
school construction projects 
already approved by the 
state to become eligible for 
90 percent reimbursement 
as opposed to the traditional 
63 percent reimbursement. 
(Cont'd on page W) 



Health Officials Advise: 

'Don't Panic' But 

Take Precautions 

On West Nile Virus 

By CRAIG SALTERS 

Both state and local health officials are urging calm and preventive mea- 
sures to combat the West Nile Virus (WNV), which was recently identified 
in infected crows in Jamaica Plain and Hopkinton. 



There have been no posi- 
tive tests for the virus in 
Quincy or Norfolk County 
— and no plans for targeted 
mosquito spraying as yet — 
although that could change 
suddenly if the virus is de- 
tected locally. 

"The first thing I would 
tell people is not to panic," 
said John Smith, superinten- 
dent of the Norfolk County 
Mosquito Control Project. 
"Certainly take precautions, 
and if you have any (stag- 
nant) water on your property, 
get rid of it. But we've had 
calls asking to spray the en- 
tire county and that's just not 
necessary." 

Stagnant water is a con- 
cern. Smith said, because the 
West Nile Virus is carried by 
a "container bucket" variety 
of mosquito which breeds 
specifically in that environ- 
ment. 

But Smith emphasized 
that West Nile Virus is mild 
when compared to the al- 
ready-known Eastern Equine 
Encephalitis (EEE), which 



West Nile Virus Precautions 



There is no vaccine for the West Nile Virus but the 
Massachusetts Department of Health urges residents to 
take the following precautions: 

• Avoid outdoor activities between dusk and dawn, if 
possible, since this is the time when mosquitoes are most 
active. 

• If you must be outdoors when mosquitoes are active, 
wear a long-sleeved shirt and long pants. 

• Use a mosquito repellent that contains DEET (the 
chemical N-N-diethyl-meta-toluamide) and follow the di- 
rections on the label. DEET can be toxic if overused. 
Never use DEET on infants. Avoid using repellents with 
DEET concentrations above 10-15 percent for children 
and with concentrations above 30-35 percent for adults. 
Cream, lotion, or stick formulas arc best. Avoid products 
with high amounts of alcohol. 

• Most mosquito repellents will remain effective for 
many hours, so it is not necessary to reapply the repel- 
lent. Once inside, wash off insect repellents thoroughly 
with soap and water. 

• Take special care to cover up the arms and legs of 
children playing outdoors. When you bring a baby out- 
doors, cover the baby's carriage or playpen with mos- 
quito netting. 

• Fix any holes in your screens and make sure they are 
tightly attached to all your doors and windows. 



has killed roughly 70 Mas- 
sachusetts residents since de- 



finitive testing for it was be- 
(Cont'd on paf>c 28) 



Kolson Wants 'Record 
Straight' On Back Pay 



Former City Council 
President Peter Kolson is 
upset with the State Legis- 
lature's decision last week 
to let die in committee a 
home rule petition which 
would have allowed Kolson 
more than three years in 
council back pay. 

But what angers Kolson 
most, he said, is the state 
law which created the 
problem in the first place: 
268A, section 20, which 
specifically mandates that 
employees of a housing 
authority choose between a 
housing authority salary and 




PETER KOLSON 

a municipal salary, in this 
case a councillor's salary. 
Kolson, a superintendent 



with the Quincy Housing 
Authority, said the remain- 
ing back pay, which he es- 
timated at less than $10,000, 
is not the real issue but part 
of his decade-long battle to 
correct what Kolson calls "a 
skewered law, poorly ap- 
plied and prejudicial." 

"The (Quincy) Housing 
Authority is funded via the 
state and the federal gov- 
ernment," Kolson said. "I 
receive no retirement, no 
benefits from the city of 
Quincy, so the question of a 
'double salary' doesn't even 

(Cont'd on page 20) 



•. < 1 I » t » • » 



Page 2 T1&* Qulnoy Sun Thursday, August 3, 2000 



Gargoyle Will Be Restored 

Bethany Needs $500,000 

To Repair Damage 

From Lightning Bolt 



-*:■■' 



By TOM HENSHAW 

The 2,000-pound light- 
ning-damaged gargoyle on 
the steeple of Bethany Con- 
gregational Church was 
successfully lowered 120 
feet to the ground last week. 

Now comes the less for- 
midable but equally impor- 
tant job of cloning the deco- 
ration from a mixture of 
granite and cement and re- 
storing it to its perch high 
above Quincy Center. 

The gargoyle was 
cracked July 18 when light- 
ning struck the steeple of 
the church at the corner of 
Spear and Coddington 
Streets, sending a 600- 
pound piece of the spire 
crashing through the roof. 

No one was injured but 
first estimates of the overall 
damage to the church were 
placed at $500,000. 

The gargoyle, which was 
embedded two-feet deep in 
the corner of the steeple, 
was successfully removed in 
a delicate operation by a 



crew from Louis 
Pasqualucci & Sons, Inc., 
the general contractor. 

"It's dowR on the ground 
right now," said the Rev. 
William Harding, the pastor. 
"The next thing will be to 
make a cast for the new 
one." 

The Rev. Harding said is 
not sure whether the gar- 
goyle was insured. 

"I'm hoping it was," he 
said. "But you know how 
insurance companies are. 
Either way, we will be 
holding fund raisers to pay 
for it or make up any differ- 
ence." 

In the meantime, Rev. 
Harding said, any donations 
to the church would be 
greatly appreciated and, 
given the church's non- 
profit status, would be tax- 
deductible. 

It's likely to be next 
spring before the 73-year- 
old church structure is fully 
restored and operational. 
■ "The school will be run- 



ning by September," said 

the Rev. Harding. The piece 
of the steeple that crashed 
through the roof wound up 
in the school's classroom. 

"The outside will take 
about six to eight months. 
That will take us into the 
spring," he said. 

It is not yet decided 
whether the restored church 
will be protected by light- 
ning rods. 

"I would like to see 
them," said the pastor. "But 
the committee will have to 
discuss that. I don't think 
lightning rods would have 
prevented what happened." 

The damaged gargoyle 
was one of four that 
"protected" the church from 
their lofty perches on the 
four steeples. 

"The first gargoyles were 
placed on the rain spouts of 
churches in Medieval times 
to ward off evil," explained 
the Rev. Harding. 



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CONTRACTORS from Louis Pasqualucci & Sons, Inc. successfully remove a 2000-pound gar- 
goyle from the steeple of Bethany Congregational Church in Quincy Center. The gargoyle was 
damaged by a lightning strike July 18. 




AFTER BEING REMOVED from the church steeple, the damaged gai^oyle descends 120 feet 
to the ground with the help of a harness, chains and an aerial platform truck. 




SAFELY ON THE GROUND, the gargoyle will be ''cloned" from a mixture of granite and 
cement. Church ofGcials hope to replace the gargoyle to its perch high above Quincy Center by 
next spring. 




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Tlmnday, Au^ist 3, 2000 



Faxon House To Be 
Razed For Hospital Parking 

$100,000 Drive Starts 

To Find New Home 

For Detox Center 



By CRAIG SALTERS 

Fundraising efforts are 
underway to help Faxon 
House Recovery find a new 
home, but the detox center 
is still a far cry - roughly 
$96,000 -- from the 
$100,000 needed to fmance 
moving expenses and the 
purchase of new equipment. 

And the clock is running, 
as Quincy Medical Center 
has told Faxon House, now 
located in the former Gor- 
don House student nurse 
quarters at 120 Whitwell St., 
to vacate the premises by 
Sept. 15 so that QMC can 
create additional parking 
space. 

"We'd love to stay in 
Quincy," said Shawn Shee- 
han, executive director of 
Faxon House, whp said the 
recovery program's hunt to 
find a new facility has fo- 
cused on several Quincy 
locations and a few just over 
the line in towns such as 
Braintree. 

Sheehan said Faxon 
House - the only detox and 
tecovepy program between 
Boston and Plymouth — 
made anii^itial letter writing 
appeal to civic and business 
leadei^' almost as soon as it 
got its eviction notice and 
has since received almost 
$4,000 in donations. 



"We've been getting many 
donations from Quincy and 
the entire South Shore 
community," said Sheehan. 

What's most impressive, 
he added, was the strong 
support the center has re- 
cieved from its own em- 
ployees, both current and 
former, and from the recov- 
ering community which it 
has served over the years. 
"We received a donation 
recently with the message, 
'1 just want to thank you for 
27 years of sobriety,'" 
Sheehan said. "That felt 
great." 

Faxon House, also 
known as Faxon Recovery 
Quincy Detox, is an in- 
patient alcohol and sub- 
stance abuse treatment cen- 
ter established in 1972 - the 
oldest such program in the 
state, said Sheehan. It pro- 
vides treatment, counseling, 
and recovery services and 
refers patients to long-term 
treatment groups such as 
Alcoholics Anonymous. 

Sheehan said the center's 
28-year tradition of treat- 
ment has created an incredi- 
ble network among the re- 
covering community. For 
instance, AA meetings are 
held daily at Faxon House 
and many of those running 
the meetings are ex-clients 



of the facility. That means 
recovering alcoholics and 
addicts about to leave Faxon 
House are naturally brought 
into existing AA group 
meetings and other long- 
term treatment groups by 
the people most suited and 
most willing to support their 
sober and drug-free life- 
style. 

A recent study by Har- 
vard Medical School, Shee- 
han noted, showed that in- 
patient detox centers were 
more effective than their 
outpatient counterparts pre- 
cisely because of the close 
bonding that occurs between 
patients and counselors and 
among the patients them- 
selves. 

Sheehan also emphasized 
that, throughout its 28 years, 
Faxon House has kept a 
good relationship with the 
community at large, re- 
counting a story where a 
friend of his asked direc- 
tions to Faxon House from a 
resident of Whitwell St. and 
that resident didn't know 
where it was. 

High praise, said Shee- 

(Cont 'd on page 11^, i 

U-U. 




THESE DOORS LEADING into the Faxon House Recovery Detoxification Center, 120 
Whitwell St, will not only soon be closed but gone along with the entire building which will 
be razed for more parking at Quincy Medical Center. An estimated $100,000 is needed to find 
a new location for the center which has treated over 50,000 patients since it was established in 
1972. (Quincy Sun Photo) 



Sunday Opening Fees 
To Be Eliminated 



By MARIE D'OLIMPIO 

Businesses will no longer 
pay a $25 a year fee to open 
on Sundays. Older stores 
have been paying fees for 
many years while the newer 
stores have not. 

The License Board 
Tuesday decided that the 
older ones will no longer 
have to pay. 

According to Board 

Chairman Joseph Shea, the 

$1900 the city collected 

each year from these stores 

ican be absorbed through 



other license fees. 

Shea said the License 
Board issues 23 different 
licences and this matter has 
just "fallen through the 
cracks." He noted with the 
use of computers, "they are 
catching up on everything." 

Shea cited some of the 
newer stof'es that have never 
paid including Home Depot, 
Wal-Mart and most super- 
markets. 

Shea said the Blue Laws 
which had been on the 
books for many years, "do 
not exist anymore." 



When asked if the busi- 
nesses that have been pay- 
ing all these years are going 
to be reimbursed. Shea an- 
swered, "we have no power 
to rebate money." He added, 
"we don't want to go back- 
wards, but go forward." 

She said it was his inten- 
tion to "make things con- 
sistent and fair." 

Board members sug- 
gested they notify the law 
offices for a decision and 
discuss it at the Aug. 29 
meeting. . , 




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Pa«e4 TlM Qoliiey Sun Thursday, August 3, 2000 



Cdinicn 





I I s: 



By Henry Boswoith 



McCauley Book Due In September 



Frank McCauley's long-awaited book, A Politi- 
cal History of Quincy, is at the publishers and 
should be available in September. 

"I expect it to be off the press just after Labor Day," 
says McCauley who has spent two years researching 
and writing it. 

The 350-page ($ 1 9.95) book covers 1 1 1 years-from 
1 889 when Quincy changed from a town to a city gov- 
ernment to Mayor James Sheets's sixth term inaugura- 
tion last Jan. 3. 

There are biographical sketches, a listing of all the 
456 people who have served in local elective office 
during the time frame, photos, historic facts, anecdotes, 
tidbits, etc. 

But readers will probably jump quickly to "The 
Mayoral Hall of Fame" selected by McCauley and 
whose identities he is keeping a closely guarded secret 
until the book comes out. 

That segment should get a lot of attention and maybe 
a few political arguments if someone's favorite mayor 
doesn't make it. 

McCauley selected only six of Quincy 's 28 mayors 
for the honor. 

And won't budge on revealing who they are. 

"You'll have to read the book to find out," he says. 

But he doesn't mind telling you two who didn't make 
it: Sheets and McCauley himself. 

"Jim Sheets is still in office," he explains. "He hasn't 
completed his administration so you really can't judge 
his overall performance as mayor. That will come after 
he leaves office." 

McCauley, who served four terms as mayor, auto- 
matically disqualified himself from consideration be- 
ing the author of the book and the one making the Hall 
of Fame selections. 

"I don't think I was too bad a mayor, though," he 
muses. "I called the shots as I saw them." 

During his eight years as mayor he built a reputa- 
tion as a no-nonsense fiscally tight-fisted mayor. And 
now, as a city councillor and chairman of the Finance 
Committee, he is still trying to keep a lid on unneces- 
sary spending. 

McCauley says he based his Hall of Fame choices 
on what he learned about the early mayors while re- 
searching the book and on his personal observations of 
the later mayors. 

Politics did not enter the picture, he says. 

'The main criteria were the problems and issues the 
mayors faced during their administrations and how they 
handled them." 

He listed the six Hall of Famers in alphabetical or- 
der. Not 1 to 6. 

"I didn't try to rate them against one another," he 
says. 

But he won't even hint as to who the six are. Which 




USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co. Inc. 

1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 

Henry W. Bosworth, Jr. Publisher 
Rot}ert H. Bosworth Editor 

35c per copy. $16.00 per year by mail in Quincy 
$18.00 per year by mail outside Quincy. $22.00 out of state. 

Telephone: 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 

Periodicals postage paid at Boston, MA 

Postniaster Send address change to 

The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy MA 02199 

Tha Quincy Sun ■■■■nw no InancM rMpon«Mjiy for lypographicii tnon In 

^^'■»<wnwn|i»uttMiwp»W«ttip«itrtan«(»>wilwm<ntln<»Wc»ttw 

9tf0f occun. 




A HNAL DRAFT of Frank McCauley's A Political His- 
tory of Quincy is displayed by him and his wife, Sandra, 
at a recent Current Events breakfast at the Beechwood 
Community Center at which the former mayor was the 
guest speaker. (Sharron Beals Photo) 

throws it open for speculation. 

In fact we have speculated in earlier columns as to 
who might make the Hall of Fame. We thought of: 

Charles Porter, Quincy 's first 
mayor, charged with the responsi- 
bility of leading Quincy from a 
town form of government to that 
of a city. ;' 

Thomas Burgin, whose tenure 
was both eventful and challenging 
during part of the Great Depres- 
sion, the devastating Hurricane of 
1938 and the early days of World 




BURGIN 



War II. 

Amelio Delia Chiesa who served 
1 2 years as mayor (eight under Plan 
A, four under Plan E), a tight-spend- 
ing fatherly figure who kept the city 
on a peaceful and even keel. 

James Mclntyre, seen by many 
as one of the 





DELLA CHIESA 



McINTYRE 



brightest of all 

the mayors and the one who 
brought the city into modem times 
with development, his role in the 
coming of the MBTA, and his over- 
all foresight. 

Or, maybe John Miller, the 
only one of 
Quincy's mayors to die in office. 

McCauley makes no secret of 
his admiration for Miller. 

Miller took office in 1914 when 
the mayoral term was only one year 
and was soon diagnosed with can- 
cer. MILLER 



6 Countdown weeks to 

THE MARIE CURRY WALK Sept. 17 

'Early detection . . . saye it all.' 

-Cindy Butler, Survivor 





HANNON 



Under the city charter back then a special election 
would be called if a mayor for some reason vacated 
the office before the last 90 days of his term. 

In Miller's case, if he died or had to leave office 
before Oct. 5, a special election would have to be called 
to elect his successor. 

According to McCauley, Miller had a deathbed wish. 

"As he lay dying," says McCauley, "he wished he 
would live long enough to spare the city the cost of a 
special election." 

Miller, who was only 60, lived to Oct. 6 ~ beating 
the special election requirement by one day. City Coun- 
cil President Joseph Whiton, who would later become 
mayor himself, finished out the remaining days of 
Miller's term. 

"Imagine," says McCauley, "lying there dying and 
thinking of just living long enough to save the city 
money." 

Did Porter, Burgin, Delia Chiesa, Mclntyre or Miller 
make the Hall of Fame? You'll have to wait for the 
book to come out. 

McCauley, however, doesn't mind letting you in on 
some of the tidbits in the book. Such as: 

Of the city's 28 mayors, only five have been full- 
time. Walter Hannon was the first 
in 1972 followed by Joseph 
LaRaia, Arthur Tobin, McCauley 
and Sheets. 

Of the 456 people who have 
served as mayors, city councillors 
and school committee members, 
only 20 have been women. 

That, despite the fact that for 
some time now, Quincy has had more women voters 
than men. As of 1999 it was 56 percent women and 44 
percent men. 

The most common name in Quincy politics? Smith, 
the same as it is in the telephone directory. 

"But that was mainly in the early days," says 
McCauley. 

The book also contains a prologue of Quincy 's settle- 
ment as Mount Wollaston, as the north precinct of 
Braintree and the town 'of Quincy. 

McCauley, a Quincy polifical historian and Repub- 
lican, was asked by Sheets, a Democrat, to write the 
book as part of the city's millennium celebration. 

"I tried to be objective and I believe I was," says 
McCauley. 

He wrote the book in long-hand. His wife, Sandra, 
then typed the ch^ters on a word processor, and helped 
in the editing. 

"Without her I would never have finished it," says 
McCauley. 

It's been a two-year labor of love for both of them. 
They did it for free. No fee. 

One thousand hard cover copies are being printed 
ias the first edition. 

"I think the $19.95 price per copy is pretty reason- 
able," says McCauley who will receive none of it. All 
the revenue will go to the city. 

"I hope Quincy residents will find the book inter- 
esting," McCauley says. "I found researching it inter- 
esting." 

He adds: 

"There's nothing sensational in the book, I don't 
think I will be sued." 

But does hope he will be read. 

A signing event for the book tentatively is planned 
for sometime in September probably at the Quincy 
Historical Society. 
, «Ihe author hopes he . will se&'you'then^^ •' 



Thursday, August 3, 2000 Tli« Qulnoy Sun Page 5 



Scenes From Yesterday 







■«!Kjj6$5V'«^5P*'' 




THIS POSTCARD is a view of some of the summer because of trees and shrubs. Only a few of these cot- 
cottages on Great Hill at the end of Hough's Neck as tages are still summer homes, most have been converted 
they appeared about 1912. Note the lack of trees, to- to year round use. The sewer tunnel to Nut Island heads 
day from this spot, most of these houses cannot be seen east under the roadway leading in from the lower left. 
, From the Collection of Tom Galvin 



Rkadkrs Forum 



More On Paving Front Lawns And Personal Liberty 



Quincy's 
Yesterdays 

1,000 Fans Crowd 
Sears To See 
Ted Williams 



Aug. 3 - 9 

1961 

39 Years Ago 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 
Kudos to Greg Newton 
for saying out loud what 
many Quincy residents have 
been thinking for some time 
now. 

There is nothing worse 
than seeing home owners ei- 
ther paving over lawns for 
their cars or just parking right 
on the grass. Quincy is get- 
ting tackier constantly. Turn- 
ing lawns into parking lots 
for four, five, or six cars is 
having a negative impact on 
my neighborhood. Just be- 



cause there are too many cars 
at one house doesn't mean 
you start pressing cement 
trucks into service. 

As a basic conservative, I 
had to laugh as I read Mike 
Denaro's recent letter criti- 
cizing Newton's earlier let- 
ter. 

Yes, property owners 
have property rights. Mr. 
Denaro says paving their 
front yards is a homeowner' s 
right that should be free, ap- 
parently, of all government 
interference. 



Mr. Denaro, government 
places many restrictions on 
all of us, all the time, doesn't 
it? One cannot turn a single- 
family home into a two-fam- 
ily without getting the okay 
from someone at City Hall. 
One cannot operate a board- 
ing house without getting the 
appropriate permission form 
City Hall, right? One also 
cannot operate acommercial 
business in an area zoned for 
residential use. 

This isn't about "personal 



freedom and liberty," it is 
about making sure our neigh- 
borhoods don't start looking 
like one giant junk yard, 

Just because one may have 
the right to do something 
doesn't mean we're required 
to do so, does it? What about 
common sense? 

The real issue isn't the 
existence of paved lawns. 
The real issue is why so many 
people are doing it. 

Sal J. Giarratani 

Atlantic St. 



Kudos To Massachusetts Probation Officers 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

The week of July 23-29 
was designated National Pro- 
bation, Parole, and Commu- 
nity Supervision Officers' 
Week. President Bill Clinton 
publicly endorsed this cel- 
ebration and Governor Paul 
Cellucci issued a proclama- 
tion in recognition of Proba- 
tion Officers' Week in Mas- 
sachusetts. 

As the Commissioner of 
Probation in the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, 1 
would like to join President 
Clinton and Governor 
Cellucci in applauding the 
1,400 men and women pro- 
bation officers who comprise 
the Massachusetts Probation 
Service for their commitment 
to the criminal justice sys- 
tem and the communities 
they serve. Probation is a 
court-ordered sanction 
placed on a person convicted 
of a crime. The offender is 
allowed to remain in the com- 
munity under the sUict su- 
pervision of a probation of- 
ficer. 

Probation officers have 
their finger on the pulse of 
the community. It is their 
primary duty to monitor of- 
fenders and to assist them in 
overcoming social problems 
such as drug addiction, alco- 
holism, mentalJtwUh issucs< 



and violence.' More than 80 
percent of probationers have 
substance abuse-related 
problems. Probation officers 
work hand in hand with com- 
munity groups and social ser- 
vice agencies to provide of- 
fenders with the support they 
need. Probation officers also 
work closely with local po- 
lice departments on warrant 
apprehension teams to get 
probation violators off the 
street. 

Because they are out on 
the streets checking on pro- 
bationers day and night, they 
are on the front-lines in the 
battle against crime. Proba- 
tion officers in the Family 
and Probate Courts also work 



to keep families together and 
to ensure children live in safe 
homes. 

The Massachusetts Pro- 
bation Service boasts of a 
number of programs that help 
offenders turn their lives 
around and assist them in 
becoming citizens who con- 
tribute positively to the com- 
munity. The Probation Ser- 
vice also works in collabora- 
tion with the Office of Com- 
munity Corrections (OCC) 
under the leadership of OCC 
Executive Director Steven 
Price. 

The 14 centers, located 
throughout the state, provide 
intensive substance abuse 
treatment, educational oppor- 



tunities for offenders, and 
restorative justice through 
community service projects 
while providing public safety 
and utilizing electric moni- 
toring. Programs such as the 
Fatherhood and Mother Pro- 
grams teach offenders how 
to be better parents to their 
children. 

Massachusetts Probation 
Service continues its reign as 
a national leader in address- 
ing the issues of the victim- 
ized while effectively work- 
ing to reduce criminal activ- 
ity. 

John O'Brien 

Commissioner of Probation 

The Massachusetts 

Probation Service 



■ ■■■■■ SUBSCRIPTION FORM ■■■■■■ 

FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 



1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



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CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 

[ ] 1 YEAR IN QUINCY $16.00 

( ]1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY $18.00 [ ] CHECK ENCLOSED 

( ]1 YEAR OUT OF STATE $22.00 [ ] PLEASE BILL ME - 



By PAUL HAROLD 

One thousand enthusiastic fans crowded into Sears Roe- 
buck in downtown Quincy to see 

Red Sox great Ted Williams who 
was here to promote new lino of 
Williams' sports equipment. 
The crowd was made up mostly 

of women and Liulc Leagucr.s seek- 

ing autographs. Williams complied 

with all requests signing anything that ink would adhere to: 

programs, baseballs, baseball gloves and pictures. 

Coordinating the event were store manager Jeremiah 
Donovan and Donald Farrow head of the sports department. 
McDONALD BOOSTS INCINERATOR AT STABLES 
Ward 4 City Councillor George McDonald praised the 
planning board for their recommendation of the city stables, 
near the DPW complex, as the silo for a city incinerator. 

In speaking against the Quarry St. site, McDonald said 
that the people of West Quincy should be given some relief, 
having suffered so many years with dump problems. 

McDonald said the Quarry St. site was too valuable from 
a tax revenue point of view. He predicted that in a few years 
time multi-story apartments building would be constructed, 
widening the tax base and taking $10 off the tax rate from 
the smaller homes. 
COUNCILLORS' FREE PARKING QUESTIONED 
George Yarrington of the Quincy Taxpayers Association 
(QTA) questioned the free parking by Councillor Carl Ander- 
son, whom he claimed parked at a "hooded meter," thus 
avoiding the five cent an hour fee. 

Yarrington said that for three months he and members of 
his association had observed Anderson's car parked at a 
"hooded meter" on Hancock St. near Rogers Jeweler, where 
the councillor worked. 

In response, Anderson said he didn't even know what a 
"hooded meter" was and that the car in question was regis- 
tered to his son. He brushed off Yarrington's attack as sour 
grapes since the QTA leader failed in his attempt for ap- 
pointment to a regional transportation board. 
QUINCY-ISMS 
At its shortest meeting on record (two minutes 17 sec- 
onds) the city council elected Councillor David Mcintosh 
both council president and acting mayor. The vote was 
needed since both Mayor Amelio Delia Chiesa and Council 
President William Ellis were out of town on vacation. Coun- 
cillor George Burke made the motion nominating Mcintosh. 
. . The license board granted permission to Gary's Restau- 
rant to expand from 6 to 8 Maple St. to No. 10. . . Mrs. 
Raymond Adams was elected secretary of the Rock Island 
Cove Association for her 26th term. . . Boats and water ski- 
ers were banned from Mound St. Beach at the request of 
Councillor Joseph LaRaia because they endangered bath- 
ers. . . A building permit was issued for a new Presbyterian 
church. The estimated cost was $345,000. . . Candidate for 
Ward 6 councillor, Richard Barry, called for a North Quincy 
branch library. . . Nicholas Musto, Quincy's last "grouter," 
died. At one time there were hundreds of "grouters" at the 
quarries, working on rejected stones. Those stones were used 
for curb stones and columns for driveways. . . Patrolman 
Donald Cunningham helped deliver a baby for a woman on 
Grafton St. . . Col. Walter Fuller, director of Civil Defense, 
was the main speaker at the Kiwanis Club. . . Edward Kasper 
was named chairman of the Houghs Neck Community 
Council's honors banquet. . . Anthony Losordo presented 
plans for the development of the Old Faxon estate. He esti- 
mated that 40 homes could be built there costing between 
$35,OOO-$40,OO0. . . Eight hundred members of the United 
Steelworkers Union met at NQHS auditorium to discuss the 
recent wage offer of the Boston Gear Works. A five-center 
an hour increase was offered with a nine-cent an hour for 
top grades. Across 1 2 grades, wages would increase from 
$1 .7 1 1/2 an hour to $2.72 1/2 an hour. The union talks were 
headed by the union's international representative, Clifford 
Sommers of Wollaston. . . A 1953 Chevrolet, minus its reg- 
istration plates, was found hanging over the edge of Swingle's 
Quarry. . . At Quincy City Hospital, a daughter was bom to 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Hogan of South St. . . Mr. and Mrs. Leo 
Caporale of Pcrley Place celebrated their 45th wedding an-, 
niversaty. ..,,,,.,..., ...,«„^. 



^v; aBVasBBVP 



Ptjti ThmQuimayBvuk Thunday, August 3, 2000 





INCA SON, a music and dance ensemble that performs music of ancient Peru and all of Latin 
America, concludes this year's Thomas Crane Public Library Concert Series with a 
performance on the library lawn Aug. 10. 

Inca Son Performs At 
. Crane Library Aug. 10 



HOT SPOT CABARET 



Sounds Of Broadway 
On USS Salem Aug. 6 



Inca Son performs the 
music of the Andes Thurs- 
day, August 10, from 12:30 
p.m. until 1:30 p.m. on the 
lawn of the Thomas Crane 
Public Library, Quincy 
Square. 

The group is a music and 
dance ensemble who dress 
in authentic and Qolorful 
Inca attire, inviting the 
audience to share the sights, 
sounds, and culture of an- 
cient Peru and all of Latin 
America. The range of mu- 
sical styles is intended for 
listeners of all ages. 



Inca Son performs both 
traditional songs and origi- 
nal compositions on their 
instruments, many of which 
they make themselves. Each 
song has a special impor- 
tance, meaning, or back- 
ground in Andean folklore. 
The musicians share their 
culture in workshops and 
concerts including full-scale 
stage productions. The 
award-winning ensemble 
performs internationally at 
concerts and festivals and 
has several recordings. 
The Library's 2000 con- 



cert series concludes with 
the Inca Son performance. 

Concertgoers are wel- 
come to bring lawn chairs, 
blankets, and picnics. In 
case of rain, the concert will 
be held at the Adams Shore 
Branch Library, 519 Sea St., 
Quincy. Both sites are ac- 
cessible and concerts are 
free. 

The concert series is 
funded in part by the 
Quincy Cultural Council, a 
local agency supported by 
the Massachusetts Cultural 
Council. 



Hot Spot Cabaret, a six- 
member theatrical troupe, 
will present a Broadway 
revue aboard the USS Salem 
Sunday, Aug. 6, beginning 
at 2 p.m. 

The troupe, which has 
appeared in Boston, on 
Cape Cod and at the Quincy 



Center Dinner Theatre, un- 
der the musical direction of 
Rob Bezubka, features 
popular songs, comedy, 
costumes and Broadway 
music from such shows as 
"Les Miserables," "Sweet 
Charity," "Hello Dolly," 
"Phantom of the Opera," 
and others. 



Admission is $6 for 
adults and $4 for children 
and seniors. Admission 
price also includes a tour of 
the Salem, berthed off 

Route 3A, near the Fore 
River Bridge. For more in- 
formation call (617) 479- 
7900. 



^Skyline Cabaret^ Dinner Theatre 
At RaffaeFs Starts Aug. 9 



Playground Fundraiser 
At Yard Rock Blues Club 



A cocktail reception at 
the Yard Rock Bliies Club, 
132 East Howard St., was 
scheduled for Wednesday 
from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. to 
raise funds to build a play- 
ground at the Snug Harbor 
School. 

Lisa Hajjar, chairperson 
of the Fundraising Com- 
lAittee, said food, a cash bar, 
and music would be pro- 
vided courtesy of the Yard 
Rock Blues Club. Donations 
of $25 can be paid the night 
of the event or mailed to: 



Germantown Neighborhood 
Council/Kaboom Play- 
ground, c/o Lisa Hajjar, 15 
Howe St., Quincy, MA, 
02169. 

The $35,000 community- 
built playground for the 
children of Germantown is 
thanks in part to a generous 
donation of CNA Insurance 
and Kaboom, a non-profit 
organization helping busi- 
nesses and communities 
build playgrounds. 

The community, organ- 
ized through the parents of 



Snug Harbor Community 
School and the Germantown 
Neighborhood Center, must 
raise $15,000 to fulfill its 
part in the playground con- 
struction. 

The Yard Rock reception 
is one of many fundraising 
efforts to raise the necessary 
funds. The committee's goal 
is to raise the funds by the 
bam raising event to be held 
Sept. 30. 

For more information or 
to get involved, call (617) 
770-9930. 




Dinner Theatre at the 
Skyline Room at Raffael's, 
1 Enterprise Drive, contin- 
ues in August with Skyline 
Cabaret: An Evening With 
Boston's Brightest Cabaret 
Stars. 

Show dates are August 9, 
10, 23, and 25, with dinner 
starting at '6:30 p.m. There 
is also a noon matinee for 
the August 23 date. 

The show offers an eve- 
ning reminiscent of bygone 
"supper clubs" and features 
performers Sarah DeLima, 
Carol O'Shaughnessy, Jan 
Peters, and Ida Zecco. The 
show has been singled out 
for its "campy element" and 
has received rave reviews 
from both The Boston Globe 
and The New York Times. 

Tickets are $40 per per- 
son (includes tax and gratu- 
ity), $30 for the Wednesday 
matinee series. 

Skyline Cabaret is one in 
a series of musical theatre 
revues running from June to 
December sponsored jointly 
by Raffael's and JM Pro- 
ductions of Quincv. 



The goal, says John 
McDonald, executive pro- 
ducer of JM Productions, is 
to present quality local din- 
ner theatre at reasonable 
prices. "People in Quincy 
and around the South Shore 
have a real appetite for more 
upscale entertainment op- 
tions - without the hassle of 
having to go into Boston," 
McDonald said. 

Other shows in the series 
include: 

Forever Plaid: Septem- 
ber 20, 21, 27, and 28; a 
nostalgic look at pop hits of 
the 1950's. 

A Grand Night For 
Singing: October 4, 5, 11, 



12, 25, and 26; a Rodgers 
and Hammerstein work 
featuring music from Okla- 
homa. The Sound of Music ^ 
South Pacific, and Carousel, 
among others. 

The All Night Strut. No- 
vember ly% \5, 16, 29, and 

30; a look at the depth and 
variety of popular American 
music from the 1930's and 
1940's. 

What Christmas Means 
To Me: dates to be an- 
nounced. 

For more information or 
to order tickets, call (617) 
786-SHOW or call Raffael's 
at (617) 328-1600. 



Meredith Langille 
Commended Student 



Meredith Langille of 
Quincy, a senior at Tabor 
Academy in Marion,, has 
been named to the Com- 
mended Student List for the 
second semester. Students 
earn commendation for 
achieving an overall average 



of 80 or above, with no 
grade below 75 and no more 
than one grade between 75 
and 80. 

Merri is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Adin Langille 
of Quincy. . 



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Thursday, August 3, 2000 Tb« Quix&oy Sun Page? 



Social 



Storyteller Series 
Continues At 
Adams Shore Library 

The Summer Storytellers 
Series continues Tuesday, 
Aug. 8 at 7 p.m. at the 
Adams Shore Branch Li- 
brary, 519 Sea St., with a 
performance by Jennifer 
Smith. 

Smith will present a pro- 
gram entitled "The Water Is 
Wide," featuring stories 
about various bodies of wa- 
ter and the creatures, real 
and fantastic, that inhabit 
them. 

At the same time a Pa- 
jama Time Storyhour with 
Dottie Moynihan will be 
offered for younger siblings 
accompanied by an adult 
and families with children 
under the age of five. Tol- 
stoy's fairy tale about the 
Enormous Turnip will be 
this week's featured story. 

The six-week Summer 
Storytellers Series con- 
cludes with Story- 
teller/Musician Scott Kep- 

Brother, Sister Graduate 
400 Miles Apart, Same Day 





QHS Class Of 1945 
Reunion Sept. 8 



JENNIFER SMITH 

nes Aug. 15. The final Pa- 
jama Time with Dottie 
Moynihan will feature sto- 
ries by author Eric Carle. 

The programs are spon- 
sored by an LSTA grant 
from the Massachusetts 
Board of Library Commis- 
sioners and a Quincy Arts 
Lottery grant from the Mas- 
sachusetts Cultural Council. 



MR. and MRS. KEITH SIMMONS 
(Russ Ro Photogmphy) 

Kathleen Scamici Wed 
To Keith Simmons 



The Quincy High School 
Class of 1945 is having their 
55th reunion Sept. 8 at the 
Quincy Neighborhood Club 
from 12 noon to 4 p.m. 

The committee, headed 
by Claire MuUarkey Barry, 
are seeking the following 
members: 

Robert Bennet, Elizabeth 
Bishop (Bonney), Norman 
Burrell, Lillian Buthlay, 
Richard Carroll, Hilda Car- 
ter (Kershaw), Jean Corco- 
ran (Kennedy), Helen Cork- 
ery (Akoury), Lorraine 
Curley (de Clerck), Peter 
DiCristofaro, Marion Fre- 
derick (Kent), Mary Good- 
mith (Boidi), Frances Hale 



(Moberg), Alice Jackson 
(Lyman), Bemice Kaplafka 
(White), William Kennerly, 
Eugene Carl Koury, Doris 
Linnell, Eleanore Logan 
(Perrone), Robert Lopez, 
Claire Lundgren (Falway), 
Louise Murray (Regalia), 
George Nelson, Louise No- 
ble, Dorothy Tardiff 
(Stuart), Arnold (Weiner) 
Winston, Barbara (Wiggin) 
Schaltenbrand, Ruth Wolf 
(Weeds), and Norman 
Young. 

Contact Claire Barry, 
chairman, 20 Salem St., 
Quincy or telephone, 617- 
773-9210 before Aug. 15. 



Christine Theodara Neamtu 
Graduates Harvard College 



Nicole Peterson and her 
brother, Benjamin, gradu- 
ated with honors from two 

different schools some 400 
miles apart on the same day. 
. Nicole got a degree in 
anthropology, sociology and 
Latin American studies 
from Hobart and William 
Smith College in Geneva, 
N. Y., at the same time 
Benjamin was accepting a 
diploma from Cohasset 
High School. 

They are the children of 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. 
Peterson Jr. of Cohasset 
and the grandchildren of 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. 
Peterson Sr. of Quincy. 

Nicole was on the varsity 
sailing team at Hobart for 



four years and was chosen 
to the All American team at 
the Nationals at King's 
Point, N.Y., in June. 

She is currently traveling 
in South America. 

Benjamin was president 
of the National Honor Soci- 
ety at Cohasset High, also 
president of the Student 
council and co-captain of 
the soccer team. 

He received the Alice 
and Walter Shuebruk Schol- 
arship, the Cohasset Student 
Council Scholarship, the 
Cohasset Rotary Club 
Scholarship and the Cohas- 
set Soccer/Booster Club 
Scholarship. 

He will attend Bowdoin 
College in Brunswick, 
Maine, in the fall. 



A reception at the Top of 
the Ridge, Braintree fol- 
lowed the recent wedding of 
Kathleen Scamici and Keith 
Simmons. Rev. Richard 
Brandyke performed the 
ceremony in Fort Square 
Presbyterian Church. 

The bride was attended 
by Erin Smith as Maid of 
Honor. Bridesmaids were. 
Heather Dingledy, Kim 
Lipomi, Meredith Lionco, 
Stephanie Grier and Joanna 
Warner. 

William Simmons was 
his brother's Best Man. 
Ushers were Jeremiah De- 
hond,, Paul Simmons, uncle 
of the groom, Andrew 
Ziegler, Dann Brown and 

Christine Duddy 

Graduates 
From Westfleld 



Nick SimroOBS, brother of Christine Theodora of Quincy 
the groom. Neamtu of Quincy recently 

The bride is the daughter graduated from Harvard 



College. 

She is the daughter of 
Nicolae and Florica Neamtu 



of 



Christine Duddy 
Quincy recently graduated 
from Westfield State Col- 
lege with a bachelor's de- 
gree in Business Manage- 
ment. 

Save Gasand Money 
Shop Locally 



of Larry and Patricia 
Scarnici of Quincy. The 
groom is the son of Ray and 
Joarme Simmons of Quincy. 

The bride graduated from 
Archbishop Williams High 
School and Gordon College 
in Wenham. She is em- 
ployed in human resources 
at South Shore Hospital, 
Weymouth. 

The groom is a graduate Caroline Ferryman 

of Nipmuc Regional High 
School in Mendon, and 
Gordon College. He is em- 
ployed as an EMT for Fal- 
lon Ambulance in Milton. 

After a wedding trip to 
Aruba, the couple are living 
in Wollaston. 



Neamtu concentrated in 
economics and graduated 
with a bachelor's degree. 
Cum Laude in field. 



Mr., Mrs. Dennis Furtado 
Parents Of Daughter 



Kimberly and Dennis 
Furtado of Quincy, are par- 
ents of a daughter Rachel 
Anne bom June 27 at South 



Regis Graduate 

Caroline Perryman of 
Quincy recently graduated 
from Regis College with a 
bachelor's degree in com- 
munication, cum laude. 



Shore Hospital, Weymouth. 
She joins her sister, Kaitlyn 
Therese. 

Grandparents are Mr. and 
Mrs. Peter R. MacPherson 
and Mr. and Mrs. Dennis 
Furtado, all of Quincy. 



.») 




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Pages Tli* Qulnoy Sun Hiursday, August 3, 2000 



Entry Forms Available 
For Quincy ArtsFest 



The Quincy Art Asso- 
ciation and the Quincy Park 
and Recreation Departments 
announce that Call for Entry 
forms are available for the 
2000 Quincy ArtsFest. 

The show of juried art, 
juried photography, chil- 
dren's art, and entertainment 
will be held in Merry mount 
Park Sept. 16 and 17. Inter- 
ested participants can have a 
Call for Entries form mailed 
to them by calling the 
Quincy Park Department at 
(617) 376-1254 or the 
Quincy Art Association at 
(617)770-2482. 

The third annual Quincy 
ArtsFest will feature the 
South Shore and Greater 
Boston's finest artists and 
photographers. Along with 
the juried art and photogra- 
phy shows, there will be live 
entertainment all weekend 
long, a Quincy Art Associa- 
tion Member's show, a chil- 
dren's art show, a bargain 
art tent, a food tent and 
much more. This year's 
show is sponsored by the 
Quincy Art Association, the 
City of Quincy Park & Rec- 




American Heart 
AssociadonJ 







WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 



reation Departments and the 
Best Western Adams Inn. 

"The Quincy ArtsFest 
has established itself as one 
of the Hnest art and photog- 
raphy shows on the South 
Shore. We hope to continue 
to draw the best and bright- 
est artists to participate in a 
great show conducted in a 
beautiful, autumn park- 
setting," said Thomas P. 
Koch, Executive Director of 
the Park, Forestry, and 
Cemetery Departments. 

Last year, more than 300 
different artists and photog- 
raphers displayed their work 
at the ArtsFest. Artists and 
photographers from Quincy, 

Braintree, Marshfield, Can- 
ton, Boston, Milton, Wey- 
mouth, Scituate, Carver, 
Randolph, Brockton and 
Cohasset participated in last 
year's event.* 

The Quincy ArtsFest 
offers a highly-competitive 
prize structure. The Best of 
Show winner will receive 
$500. Award winners in 
nine different categories 
will receive $100 for first 
place, $75 for second place, 
and $50 for third place. 
Prizes will also be awarded 
in special categories of Best 
Quincy Painting and Best 
Quincy Photograph. 

Acceptance of entries 
will be held Friday, Aug. 25 
and Saturday, Aug. 26 at the 
Richard J. Koch Family 
Park and Recreation Com- 
plex at One Merrymount 



Parkway (Rt. 3A) in 
Quincy. A non-refundable 
fee of $8 is required per 
entry for the Juried Art and 
Juried Photography shows. 
There is a maximum of 
three entries per person for 
the juried shows. 

Categories for the Juried 
Art show include oil and 
acrylic, drawing and pastel, 
watercolor, printmaking, 
mixed media, and sculpture. 
Juried Photography catego- 
ries include color, black & 
white, and digital. 

Judges for the 2000 
Quincy ArtsFest will be 
James McGurl, Professional 
Artist; Karen Pserfferle, 
Gallery Manager for the 
Copley Art Society; Susan 
Ritchay, Executive Director 
for the Copley Art Society; 
John Black, Professional 
Photographer and owner of 
Presidential Camera; J. Mi- 
chael Sullivan, Author and 
Photographer; and Sally 
Dean, Professional Artist. 

The Quincy ArtsFest is 
open to the public with free 
admission Saturday, Sept. 

16 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
and Sunday, Sept. 17 from 
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. On Friday 
evening, Sept. 15, partici- 
pating artists and special 
guests will be invited to an 
elegant, gala show premiere 
featuring strolling violinists, 
harpists, wine, cheese and 
much more. 

For more information 
call (617) 376-1254. 




QUINCY ROTARY CLUB recently installed new officers. From tlie left are Paul N. 
Baharian, vice president and treasurer; John J. Pasducco, Jr., secretary; Mary Moore 
Hurley, president; and Angela M. Ponte, president-elecL 

Mary Moore Hurley 
Rotary Club President 



Mary Moore Hurley was 
recently installed as presi- 
dent of the Quincy Rotary 
Club at a ceremony held at 
the Quincy Neighborhood 
Club. 

Also mstalled were: 
Angela M. Pointe, presi- 
dent-elect; John J. Pasciucco 
Jr., DDS, secretary; and 
Paul N. Baharian, vice 
president and treasurer. 

Members of the board of 
directors for 2000 were 
Daniel J. Flynn III, immedi- 




JOSEPH SHADDUCK 



ate past president; Robert B. 
Dolbec Jr., Eileen Tangney, 
Walter C. White, Peter Ra- 
ciot, Frank Rowbotham and 
John Eckblom. 

The Scholarship Fund 
Trustees for 2000 are Tho- 
mas M. Galvin, chairman; 
Barbara Clarke, Marybeth 
Curran, Mayrose Myrick 
and Paul Berrini. 

Joseph Shadduck, former 
Rotary Club president, was 
named a Paul Harrison Fel- 
low, the Rotary's highest 
honor. 



wMBm f €ii##i If 4m 

Kids age 18 and under can eat 

fFREE meals this sun^mer U 
at any of the following locations: j^ 

Quincy Public Schools, 2000 
Summer Food Service Program Lunch Sites 



Sean Minor Graduates From Wesleyan University 

Sean Minor, of Quincy degree in economics. bishop Williams High 

graduated from Wesleyan Son of Patricia Queeney, School. 
University with a bachelor's he is a graduate of Arch- 

Kennetbi Garber On Dean's List 



Kennetft Garber of the Dean's List for the diesex Community College. 
Quincy ha5|been named to spring semester at Mid- 




Site, Nkime, Address 



Dates of Operation, Lunch Times Site Activities 



Snug Harbor School June 26-Aug 25 

(Outdoor Shelter) 11:00-1:00 

333 Palmer St., Germantown 

Quincy Housing Authority June 26-Aug 25 
(at Circle) 11:00-1:00 

9 Bicknell Grcle, 6ermantown 



Lincoln Hancock 
Elementary School 
300 GroniU St. 



June 26 - Aug 25 
11:00-1:00 



Ward II Community Center June 26 - Aug 25 

16NevodaRoad 11:00-1:00 

Atlantic Nei^borhood Center July 5 - Aug 25 

11 Hoyward Street 11:00-1:00 



Recreation 
Arts and Crafts 



Recreation, 
Arts and Crafts 



Community Pool, 
Recreation 



Recreation Programs, 
Community Center Activities 

Recreation Programs, 
Community Center Activities 



The Sumner Food Service Progrom prohibits discrimination because of poce. sex, color, notionol origin, age or handicap. 
Sponsoiyd by the lltesocksetts Deportment of Education through rt^ 



180 



Per Course. Not Per Credit. 
Veteran Tuition Rate. 



Vietnam and Persian Gulf Veterans, 

with proper documentation may enroll In 

Quincy College Courses at this special tuition rate. 

Not applicable to Computer Science Courses. 

Does not apply to courses previously taken. 

We do require that you submit the appropriate 

documentation and pay a one-time application fee. 




Classes Begin Just After Labor Day 
Visit Enrollment Services at our 
Quincy Center Campus 
Mon-Tliurs. 8-7 
Fri.B-4 



QUINCY 

COLLEGE 



617.984.1650 



Tkanday,Aagiiit3,2aM Tlui QulaMjr Sua P>n«> 



QMC, Manet Health Team Up 

Primary Care Health Services 

Geared To Asian-Americans 

At Quincy Medical Center 



Registration Sept. 13-16 For 
QPS Adult Education Program 



Quincy Medical Center 
and Manet Community 
Health Center have teamed 
up to offer comprehensive 
primary care health services 
to Chinese speaking Asian 
Americans at a new Manet 
satellite office located at 
Quincy Medical Center. 

The new services will be 
provided by Howard Liu, 
M.D. and Lily Yuk-Yin 
Yung, M.D., two Manet 
internal medicine physicians 
who are multi-lingual, 
speaking English and Can- 
tonese and/or Mandarin. 

"Manet has been work- 
ing for over 10 years to in- 
crease access to services for 
the Asian community in 
Quincy. Our North Quincy 
site was a first step," said 
Manet Community Health 
Center Executive Director 
Ellen Haffer. "By continu- 
ing to work closely with 
Quincy Medical Center, we 
now have the resources to 
ensure that Asian-American 
residents of Quincy and 
surrounding communities 
receive local health care 
services in their language 
and that better suit their 
cultural experiences." 

"The ability to commu- 
nicate directly with your 
doctor is something most of 
us take for granted -- but for 
Asian-Americans living in 
this region, this has never 
been a given," said Quincy 
Medical Center President 
and CEO Christine 
Schuster. 

"What can be more fun- 
damental than the need to 
understand and be under- 
stood by your primary care 
doctor? I am delighted to be 
collaborating with Manet to 

make this basic service 
available to the growing 
Asian-American community 
on the South Shore," 
Schuster said. 

The most recent census 
figures for Quincy indicate 




Registration for the Fall 
2000 Session of Quincy 
Public School's Adult & 
Continuing Education pro- 
gram will take place Sept. 
13-15 from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
and Saturday, Sept. 16, from 
9 a.m. to noon at their 107 
Woodward Ave. offices. 

Classes begin the week 
of Sept. 25. 

The program offers over 
150 courses, including 50 



new courses, which are of- 
fered days, evenings, and 
weekends. 

Offerings include: inten- 
sive, one-day "Computer 
Academy" courses which 
vary from basic introduction 
to the PC to Microsoft ap- 
plications Windows, Word, 
and Excel to an introduction 
to the Internet; video tech- 
niques; dance classes; par- 
enting classes; as well as 



courses in language, health 
and wellness, and business. 

High school students 
should note that Kaplan 
Testing Centers now offers 
testing preparation at 
Quincy High with a 10 per- 
cent discount for Quincy 
students. 

To request a catalogue or 
for more information, call 
984-8888 or visit: 
www.QuincyAdultEd.com. 



Quincy Groups To Share In 
$25,000 United Way Grant 



DR. HOWARD UV 

an Asian-American popula- 
tion of 18 percent of the 
city's total population, a fast 
growing community based 
on figures of 15 years ago 
which indicated an Asian 
population of less than one 
percent. 

"As a group, we have 
long been searching for 
ways to improve medical 
care to the Asian commu- 
nity," said Amanda Le, di- 
rector of QMC Asian Serv- 
ices. "In many ways, this 
collaborative effort began 
with ideas generated by the 



DR ULY YUK-YIN YUNG 

Hospital's Asian Task 
Force, which years ago pro- 
pose4 the creation of a 
clinic for Asian-American 
primary services. 

"We are delighted that 
Manet and Quincy Medical 
Center have teamed up in 
this way to protect and pro- 
mote health care for Asian- 
Americans in Quincy and 
surrounding communities." 

Doctors Liu and Yung 
provide a full range of in- 
ternal medicine services in 
an office setting and offer 
(Cont'd on page 13) 



The United Way of Mas- 
sachusetts Bay has granted 
$25,000 to the Greater 
Boston Interfaith Organiza- 
tion (GBIO), which includes 
four organizations and con- 
gregations in Quincy. 

They are St. Ann's 
Church in Wollaston, St. 
Chrysostom Church, also in 
Wollaston; United First 
Parish Church in Quincy 

Center and the Archdioce- 
san Labor Guild. 

The GBIO was chosen to 
receive the funding because 
of the grassroots approach it 
uses to deepen citizen in- 



volvement and persuade 
policy-makers to act, the 
United Way said. 

"These funds will allow 
GBIO to train and develop 
new organizers and leaders, 
who are key ingredients in 
successful grassroots advo- 
cacy campaigns," said 
Marian L. Heard, president 



and CEO of the United 
Way. 

GBIO is a federation of 
85 religious and community 
organizations dedicated to 
developing local leadership 
for concrete improvements 
in community issues such as 
health, education and the 
economy. 



Shannon McCauley Grad From UNE 



Shannon McCauley, 
daughter of Robert and El- 
len McCauley of Quincy, 
graduated from the Univer- 
sity of New England Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences in 
Maine with a bachelor's 



degree in medical biology. 

She was involved in the 
undergraduate student gov- 
ernment, peer education, 
orientation programs and 
the leadership retreat. 




THE BOARDWALK EVENT SERIES PRESENTS 
THE FIFTH ANNUAL 




ARTS AFFAIR 

ON THE BOARDWALK AT MARINA BAY 

AUGUST 5-6, 2000 - QJJ INCY, MA 

\1ew over 300 woite of art on display featuring artwork by members of nine 

k)cal ait assodatwns: Quincy, Mihon, Braintree, Canton, Weymouth, Randolph, The 

Artists' Qrcle of the FUUer Museum in Brockton, Roslindale and West Roxbury. 

Also featured will be: 

A special exhibit of student artwork by the Woodward School forGfa4s 

live Artist Demonstrotioos on Sot, lOam-Spm & Sun., 10ani-5poL 

Open FREE to the public widi plenty of FREE parldng! 

Sponsored by: Citizens Bank, Thomson & Thomson, Boston Financial DalaSefYkjes, 

Siro's Restaurant, Peter& William O'Connell & Marina Place Assisted Living. 

In the event rfiiKleniem weadMsr, the exhibit wiU be m(wed to the lo^ 

across from the Boardwalk. 



If you've had some iiniisual cardiac activity lately, 
you'll be glad to know that we have, too. 







Iheie' 



,'s been a sudden spike in our cardiovascular services - and thaf s good news 

for you. Today more than a dozen of Boston Medical Center's top cardiac spedaUsts 
have joined Quincy Medical Center's outstanding team. They're the same specialists 



Bringing You the Best 

who helped BMC gain national recognition from U. S. News & V^orld Rqxtrt for cardiac 

care. This means, together, there's ahnost no heart problem we can't help you overcome. 

For an appointment or more information, please give us a call at (617) 376-CARE (2273). 

Quincy Medical Center is a teaching affiliate of Boston University School of Medicine. 



J 



.4 1. . . „ j_<-j:iV'--«- ;*«'!'■■*' 



Pli«t !• TlM C^ulnoy Sua Thiinday, Augut 3, 2M0 



Harold Endorsed By 
Norfolk Labor Council 



Paul Harold has been 
endorsed for Norfolk 
County Register of Deeds 
by the Norfolkl County 
Cetral Labor Council. 

The Council has 18 un- 
ion locals with a member- 
ship of 80,000. 

Council President Robert 
Rizzi said the vote to en- 
dorse Harold was unani- 
mous by the 15 locals par- 
ticipating in the endorse- 
ment meeting. 

Rizzi said, "We're proud 
to endorse Paul for the 
Register's post and recom- 
mend his cnadidacy to all 
the working men and 
women in Norfolk County. 
Based on his past reord as 



state senator and city coun- 
cillor we're confldent that 
he will serve the people of 
Norfolk County with the 
highest degree of profes- 
sionalism and integrity. 

Harold expressed his 
gratitude for the council's 
past support and especially 
for this endorsement, say- 
ing, "The council's en- 
dorsement is particularly 
important in this primary 
election for two reasons. It 
directs voters' attention to 



the importance of the Reg- 
ister's job and helps to in- 
crease the turnout in the 
Sept. 19 Democratic pri- 
mary." 

The Norfolk Register's 
job is currently held by 
Barry Hannon who an- 
nounced earlier this year his 
intention not to seek reelec- 
tion after serving 30 years. 

Harold (Previously served 
in the state senate repre- 
senting the Norfolk District, 



Extra $20 Million 

Good News For 

Schools, Other Needs 



Joseph Poggi Graduates 
From Anna Maria 

Joseph A. Poggi of with a master's degree in 
Quincy recently graduated Criminal Justice, 
from Anna Maria College 



When you put more 
into your bank, you ^ 
should get more out of it. 

NOW YOU CAN! 

With a combined total of $10,000 on 

deposit at Banic of Canton and our 

Free Checidng witli interest Account, you get 



(Cont 'dfrom page 1) 

The School Building 
Needs Task Force's July 25 
decision not to consider 
alternative plans for the 
school projects kept the city 
eligible for the 90 percent 
figure. 

But at that same meeting 
task force members also 
discussed and- approved at 
least five new measures 
which must now be dealt 
with, namely; parking at the 
Quincy Ave. site for the 
new high school; ballfields 
for same; the closing off of 

a section of Woodward 
Avenue for a proposed 
"green belt" around the new 
Central; the demolition of 
the Center For Technical 
Education (CTE); and the 



filling in of the marshlands 
around the new Central up 
to the Southern Artery. 

"Additional parking at 
the new high school will 
require one or two acres, at 
the least," Sheets said. "And 
it makes no sense to have a 
new high school for 1400 
students and not have a 
Softball field and a baseball 
field and adequate paridng." 

Expansion of high school 
capacity and the footprint of 
the actual building, the 
mayor said, created the 
parking and ballfieid issues. 

The projects to close off 
Woodward Ave. and de- 
molish the CTE, Sheets 
said, could themselves be 
eligible for 90 percent reim- 
bursement and he estimated 
addressing all five issues for 



the schools would cost no 
more than $4 million. 

In order to remain eligi- 
ble for the 90 percent reim- 
bursement, the city must 
submit plans for both proj- 
ects to the state by July 1 of 
2001. Sheets said discus- 
sions with DPW Commis- 
sioner David Colton have 
convinced him that that 
deadline will not pose a 
problem. 

The new Quincy High 
School, estimated at roughly 
$55 million, is scheduled to 
open in 2004 and new Cen- 
tral (renovated QHS), esti- 
mated at .roughly $25 mil- 
lion, is expected to open in 
2006. 

Costs for land-takings 
are not reimbursable by the 
state. 



• unlimited free ATM 
transactions* 

• Free Emerald Club checks 

• Discounts at area 
restaurants and retail 
stores 

• Free bank checks and 
travelers checks 

• Fixed-rate credit card 
with no annual fee 

• NO fees on any deposit 
accounts (including iRAs) 



• $400 off mortgage closing 
costs 

• .50% reduction on 
Interest rates for non- 
mortgage loans 

• 25% discount on safe 
deposit box rentals 



16 From Quincy Get Degrees From UMass-Amherst 

Sixteen students from Christina M. Amate, 
Quincy received under- Gina M. Bermingham, Jo- 
graduate degrees from the seph Check, Christopher R. 
University of Massachusetts Cook, Bradford P. Currie, 
at Amherst in the spring Tuan V. Dang, Daniel L. 
commencement ceremonies. Hanly, Mark E. Jolly, Paul 



Maraikovic, Jin Qian, Lisa 
M. Renzi, Brian J. Rowley, 
Michelle F. Sergeant, Holly 
L. Szeto, Em Wong, Ling 
Ping Won. 



Grand Openin' 



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CLUB. Come in or call 
now to see how you can qualify. 

*Doe5 not include surcharge 
imposed by other banks. 



ttheBANKof 

i^ A Xinri^XT 557 Washington St., Canton 

v>AiN lUIN 275 Quincy Ave.. Quincy ^^ 

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Christian Value Based Education 

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taking one class at a time, one night a 
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located in the Historic Milton Hill House 
Milton - Lower Mills, Dorchester Town Line 



Diane MacPherson 
On Dean's List 

Diane M. MacPherson of 
Quincy has been named to 
the Dean's List at Framing- 
ham State College for the 
spring semester. 

She is in the Class of 
2001, majoring in psychol- 
ogy. 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



WED&THURS AUQ2&3 

Iknee Russo - Jason Almander 

ROCKY & BULLWINKLE (PG) 

OU Time Fun 
EVE'S 7:00 ONLY 



STARTS FRI AUG 4 

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SUN-THURS 7:00 ONLY 



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TheWJDA 
Online Directory 

puts South Shore 

businesses at your fingertips! 

Log on for information about some of 

the businesses you depend on and 

hear about on WJDA! 



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Thunday^ August 3,2680 Tlf Qudaicy gm> P»ge 11 



$100,000 Drive To Find New Home For Detox Center 



(Cont'd from page 3) 

han, for a detox which has 
helped over 50,000 patients 
in its history. "We've tried 
to be a good neighbor," he 
said. 

One person who doesn't 
need much convincing on 
that point is Rev. John 
Swanson, pastor of Union 
Congregational Church and 
a former intern at the center 
during the 1980's. In a letter 

of support for the fundrais- 
ing efforts, Rev. Swanson 
said Faxon House did 
"critical work" and was a 
"necessary service to the 
community." 

Continued Rev. Swan- 
son: 

"The majority of alco- 
holics are not street people. 
Also, the average resident of 



a Detox has a job, home, 
family, and friends (for the 
present!). Quincy is blessed 
with an excellent detoxifi- 
cation program, Faxon 
House, under the superb 
leadership of Shawn Shee- 
han. While in graduate 
school I worked for Mr. 
Sheehan at Faxon House as 
I pursued certification as a 
Substance Abuse Counselor. 
I and several of my South 
Shore colleagues have made 
referrals to Faxon House." 

Sheehan and Faxon 
House Director Carol Ho- 
ban say they are both 
pleased with the response 
from the letter writing cam- 
paign. "But we're only at 
the beginning stages," 
Sheehan cautioned. 

Although Quincy Medi- 
cal Center has set a Sept. 15 
deadline for Faxon House to 



vacate its Whitwell St. site, fi»d a new facility, which 

Sheehan said he was confi- we are." 
dent QMC would work with Sheehan thanked Quincy 

the center "as long as we are Medical Center, along with 

actively trying our best to Mayor James Sheets and the 



Commission On Disability 
Meets Aug. 14 At City Hali 



The Quincy Commission 
on Disability will meet 



ond floor conference room 
of Quincy City Hall. 

The meeting is open and 

Monday, Aug. 14, begin- the public is invited to at- 

ning at 6:15 p.m. in the sec- tend. 



Next Yardwaste 
Collection Aug. 28 



The Quincy DPW re- 
minds residents that the next 
collection of yard waste will 
be Aug. 28 and the week of 
Sept. 25, again on regular 
trash day. 

From Oct. 30 to Dec. 8, 



there will be six consecutive 
weeks of yard waste collec- 
tion on residents' regular 
trash day. 



fflliTTLE WILLOWS 
I PRESCHOOL 



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by George P. Murp/iy 

As heard on WJDA Radio, 1300 AM every TTiursday at 11:00am! 

TRIP INSURANCE 

Whether you fall ill before your involves a visit to PRIME TRAVEL, 
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City Council, for their ery/Detox, P.O. Box 

strong support over the 697074, Quincy 02269- 

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Donations can be sent to: contact the center at (617) 

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Page 12 Tin* Qulatcy 8ux& ITiursday, August 3, 2000 




Quincy 2000 Co-Project 

Ribbon Cutting Reopening 
At Finian's Restaurant 



RIBBON CUTTING CEREMONIES for the re-opening of Finian's Restaurant, 1657 
Hancocl( St, after extensive interior and exterior renovations, were held Tuesday. On hand 
as Mayor James Sheets cut the ribbon were, from the left: Matt Cohen of Richard Salvaggi 
Architects; Richard Salvaggi, architect; James Hession, the restaurant's owner and founder; 
and Quincy 2000's Michael Rie, Economic Development Coordinator; Thomas Galvin, Board 
member; and Executive Director Joseph Mannarino. (Maralin Manning Photo) 



10 Quincy Residents Receive 
Third Term Honors At Thayer 



Ten students from 
Quincy achieved academic 
honors for the third term at 
Thayer Academy in Brain- 
tree. 

High honors went to 
Melissa A. Zine, daughter of 
Paul Zine; Matt Daylor, son 
of Rosalie Cryan; and Wil- 
liam C. Harding, son of the 



Rev. and Mrs. William C. 
Harding III. 

Honors were accorded to 
Kerry A. Whelan, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. William J. 
Whelan; Alana Casciello, 
daughter of Louis Casciello 
and Mary Bellrose; Chris- 
tina L. Phillips, daughter of 
Dianne Phillips; Johnice 



Rebecca Graham, daughter 
of John Graham and Mary 
Weafer; Laura Rachel 
Janowitch, daughter of Dr. 
and Mrs. Lawrence A. 
Janowitch; Michael Huen- 
Wo Tsang, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Peter M. Tsang; Tif- 
fany Michelle Wan, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Johnny 
Wan. 



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are in your region 

Whether you're thinking about having a baby, approaching 
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Physicians and midwives affiliated with South Shore Hospital ~ 
the region's number one choice for women's health care — 
have offices nearby. 

So if you're planning for a new phase of your life or just looking 
for a change, call us today. 

Call 1-800-325-5454 or visit 

www.southshorehospital.org for a referral 

or for a list of women's health care providers. 

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Quincy 2000 held a rib- 
bon-cutting ceremony Tues- 
day at the recently reno- 
vated Finian's Restaurant, 
1657 Hancock St. 

The restoration project, 
undertaken jointly by 
Finian's owner James Hes- 
sion and Quincy 2000, 
marks one of three store- 
front projects ~ as well as 
one signage improvement 
project - that Quincy 2000 
is undertaking this summer 
before these commercial 
building renovation pro- 
grams end. 

The ribbon cutting marks 
the rebirth of Finian's, said 
Hession, who founded the 
restaurant iiLl983. 

He said the renovations 
express his confidence that 
Quincy, and Quincy Center 
in particular, are vibrant 
places to do business. 

"We're looking into the 
21st century," said Hession, 
who added that he has made 
a commitment to focus 
Finian's cuisine on New 
England style dishes served 
in a modem, upbeat atmos- 
phere. 

Many New England style 
entrees, he said, have been 
added to a redesigned menu 
and many of Finian's popu- 
lar dishes have remained. 

The exterior and interior 
of the restaurant have been 
remodeled to provide a 
warm and casual environ- 
ment t)iat will contribute to 
a memorable dining experi- 
ence. 

"We at Finian's are ex- 
cited 1*0 bring a fresh new 
face to Finian's loyal cus- 
tomers and we invite new 
ones to come as well," Hes- 
sion said. 

"These highly successful 
programs have become 
models for other communi- 
ties seeking to revitalize 
their business districts," said 
Quincy 2000 Economic De- 
velopment Coordinator Mi- 
chael Rie. 

Funding for the programs 
comes from the City of 
Quincy and the US Depart- 
ment of Housing and Urban 
Development's (HUD) 
Community Development 
Block Program. Quincy 
2000 Executive Director 
Joseph Mannarino added a 
"special thanks to Mayor 
Sheets and members of the 
City Counpil for their ap- 
proval of the CDBG funding 
for this program over the 
past four years." 



The Signage Improve- 
ment Program, started in 
1^93, has replaced or im- 
proved the primary signs for 
150 businesses in Quincy, 
awarding a total of ap- 
proximately $130,000 in 
grants to said businesses. 
The awards have also lever- 
aged more than $150,000 in 
private sector spending. 

The sign improvement 
projects have enhanced the 
Quincy Center, Wollaston, 
North Quincy, and Quincy 
Point areas. 

The final project for this 
program was the installation 
of new awnings for six 
businesses located at 10-28 
A Billings Rd. in North 

Quincy, initiated by prop- 
erty owner J&D Realty 
Trust. These awnings were 
recently installed and have 
greatly improved the ap- 
pearance of the property. 

Rie also added that "the 
Storefront Improvement 
Program, started in 1996, 
has been highly successful 
in eliminating deteriorated 
^nd blighted commercial 
buildings in the city's pri- 
mary business districts." 

Including the three final 
projects, Rie said, the pro- 
gram has renovated 47 indi- 
vidual storefronts, awarded 
a total of almost $500,000 in 
grants, and leveraged almost 
$3 million in private 
spending to renovate the 
exteriors and interiors of the 
properties. 

The success of the pro- 
gram, Rie said, is due in part 
to the volunteerism of the 
Quincy 2000 Design Re- 
view Committee, comprised 
of: Mark Dickinson, Dickin- 
son Development: James 
Edwards, Holmes & Ed- 
wards; Roberta Fitzgerald, 
City of Quincy Department 
of Planning and Community 
Development; Lynne 
Houghton, Jack Conway 
Realty; Joseph Mulligan, 
JAM Architects; Sheikh 
Rahman, SAR Engineering; 
and Caryn Smith, Caryn's 
Comer. 

Finian's owner Hession 
undertook a significant 
renovation of both the inte- 
rior and exterior of his res- 
taurant. The exterior im- 
provements include new 
windows and entrance 
doorways, new lights, and a 
new paint, awning, and sig- 
nage scheme. 

This is the fourth facade 
improvement project com- 



pleted at the southern end of 
Hancock St. - including the 
two properties on either side 
of Finian's and Firestone 
located across the street, all 
of which have improved the 
southern gateway into 
Quincy Center, 

Later this summer, fa- 
cade improvements will be 
made to 13-17 Temple St., 

the former Patriot Ledger 
Building in Quincy Center. 

This architecturally sig- 
nificant building is currently 
undergoing a complete 
renovation by new owner 
Louis Mazzini. 

"The installation of win- 
dows and entrances, repli- 
cating the original design, 
will be a significant im- 
provement to the building," 
R'e said. "The successful 
renovation and leasing of 
this building, which has 
stood vacant for over 10 
years, will be the crowning 
jewel in Quincy Center's 
revitalization, which has 
been a priority of Quincy 
2000 since its inception." 

The final project for this 
round of the program is 25- 
39 Temple St./33-37 
Washington St., located 
adjacent to the former Pa- 
triot Ledger building. 

This property, owned by 
Treace, Ltd., is also under- 
going significant renova- 
tions. Plans call for the 
renovation and leasing of 
the property's upper floor, 
which has been vacant for 
five years. 

Said Rie: "The facade 
improvement calls for the 
replacement of all upper 
floor windows, a new paint 
and lighting scheme, minor 
improvements to the ground 
floor storefronts and sign 
bands, and new entrances to 
the upper floors, including 
the installation of a new 
elevator." 

Mannarino explained that 
Quincy 2000 will focus on 
its lending, small business 
assistance, and planning 
activities following the end 
of these building renovation 
projects. 

"Quincy 2000 is proud of 
the improvements we've 
made to the business dis- 
tricts through these pro- 
grams, but we are equally 
proud of the financial and 
technical assistance we've 
provided and will continue 
to provide the small busi- 
nesses in Quincy," Man- 
narino said. 



Will Be Closed Saturdays 
During July and August. 

Have A Nice, Safe Summer. 



^mmmmem^ 



Thursday, August 3, 2000 Tli* Qulnoy Sun Page 13 



Primary Care Health Services 

Geared To Asian- Americans 

At Quincy Medical Center 



(Cont 'dfrom page 9) 
management of in-patient 
care at Quincy Medical 
Center. Services include 
treatment of acute episodic 
illness, routine screening 
and complete physical ex- 
ams, minor procedures and 
management of chronic ill- 
ness, such as diabetes, heart 
disease and asthma. 

Dr. Howard Liu received 
his doctor of medicine de- 
gree from New York Uni- 
versity and a masters degree 
in biochemistry from Co- 
lumbia University. As an 
undergraduate, he studied at 



the University of Science 

and Technology of China. 
Dr. Liu has a long-standing 
interest in alternative medi- 
cine and is fluent in English, 
Cantonese and Mandarin. 

Dr. Yung received her 
undergraduate and medical 
degrees from Boston Uni- 
versity. She is interested in 
geriatric and community 
based medicine, an interest 
she put to good use while 
working for the past three 
years while working for a 
multi-cultural community 
clinic in Dorchester. Dr. 
Yung speaks English and 
Cantonese. 



Patients may speak with 
multi-lingual office staff to 
schedule appointments by 
calling 617-376-2088 Mon- 
day through Friday from 
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., or 
Thursday evenings until 8 
p.m. Shuttle service be- 
tween the Quincy Center 
MBTA Station and QMC 
will be available during of- 
fice hours. 

Most insurance and 
HMO coverage are ac- 
cepted. In addition, services 
will be provided to the unin- 
sured at discounted rates 
and no cost to those who are 
eligible. 




Morrisette Legion Awards 
$7,750 To 9 In Scholarships 



JOSEPH HOOLEY (left), president and CEO of Boston Financial Data Services (BEDS), 
makes a $50,000 donation on behalf of BEDS to sponsor a computer lab in the new addition of 
the Crane Public Library. In addition, BEDS will launch 'Boston Financial Computer Skills 
Workshops'* in September. Accepting the award are Director of Libraries Ann McLaughlin 
and Mayor James Sheets. (Quincy Sun Photo) 

U.S. Navy Band Concert Aug. 8 At 
Hancock Park Rehabilitation Center 



The Morrisette Post 
Scholarship Committee has 
awarded scholarships total- 
ing $7,750 to nine South 
Shore students. 

Chairman Paul A. M. 
Hunt said the committee 
was very impressed with not 
only the high academic 
achievements of the stu- 
dents chosen but also with 



their strong commitment to 
community service. 
The recipients: 

Gregory G. Affsa III of 
Weymouth (Weymouth 
High School). Michelle M. 
Gray of Pembroke (Silver 
Lake Regional High 
School), Kelly Mackey of 
Quincy (North Quincy High 
School), Robert B. Hanna 



Registration Sept. 13-16 
For GED Test Prep 



Registration for Quincy 
Adult & Continuing Educa- 
tion's GED Preparation 
Training program is Sept. 
13, 14, and 15 from 9 a.m. 
to 8 p.m. and Saturday, 
Sept. 16, from 9 a.m. to 
noon at their 107 Woodward 
Ave. offices. 

Classes begin the week 



of Sept. 25. 

The classes offer: GED 
preparation training; official 
GED practice examination; 
and GED testing. 

To request a catalogue 
containing course listings or 
for more information, call 
984-8888 or visit: 
www.QuincyAdultEd.com. 



John Katsarikas On Bates Dean's List 

John Katsarikas of He is son of Nicholas 
Quincy was named to the and Mary Katsarikas, Wall 
Dean's List for the second St. 
semester at Bates College. 

A member of the men's 
varsity football team, Kat- 
sarikas is a 1999 graduate of 
Quincy High School. 



Quit Smoking. 



Parent Tips 



Officers Bob k John 



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' Educate kids about non- 
alcoholic alternatives at 
summer concert and parttes 
Offer kids nonalcoholic 
drinks during family cookouts 
Keep kids k)usy with camps, 
sports or volunteering 
Set a good example for kids, 
don't drink and drive 

— Brought to you by ^— 




Bay State Community Services 
1 5 Cottage St • Quincy MA 02169 



(617)471-8400 



III of Quincy (Boston Col- 
lege High School). 

Jennifer L. Nicholson of 
Holbrook (Holbrook High 
School), Francy Ronayne of 
Quincy (North Quincy High 
School), Elizabeth Sheehan 
of Braintree (Braintree High 
School), Marie F. Tocchio 
of Braintree (Braintree High 
School), James Wirtz of 
Abington (Abington High 
School). 



The U.S. Navy Band will 
perform for residents, staff 
and public Tuesday, Aug. 8 
at 6:15 p.m. at the outdoor 

plaza at Hancock Park Re- 
habilitation and Nursing 
Center, 164 Parkingway, 
Quincy. 



The event is part of the 
summer-long Concerts on 
the Plaza series hosted by 
Hancock Park. 

The show is free and 
open to the public. Light 
refreshments will be served. 

Attendees should bring a 
lawn chair. The concert will 



be canceled in the event of 
inclement weather. 



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Page 14 THe Quinoy Svua. Thursday, August 3, 2000 




First Time Home Buyers 
Workshops Aug. 5, 12 

Quincy Neighborhood such as the Mass Housing one you know can buy a home 
Housing Services, an ap- Finance Agency, Soft Sec- with little or no money down, 
proved First Time ond Programs, down pay- The agenda will be com- 
Homebuyer Counseling ment and closing costs grants, prehensive and individual- 
Agency, will hold an accred- and other special first time ized. The focus will be on the 
ited and MHFA certified First homebuyer financing op- 



A Solution For Some: 

FHA Program For Reverse Mortgages 

Seniors Find New Avenue 
For Property Tax Relief 



Time Homebuyer' s Work- 
shop in collaboration with 
Citizens Mortgage Corpora- 
tion Saturdays, Aug. 5 and 
12. 



tions. 

Neighborhood Housing 
Services is a non-profit orga- 
nization dedicated to assist- 
ing first time buyers through 



While politicians and 
homeowners alike clamor to 



many changing aspects of 
homebuying, including how 

to locate a property within identify ways in which the lower the amount of prop- 

your budget, how to make an issue of property taxes can erty taxes which a partici- 

offer, and determining the be resolved, many pant will pay. What it can do, 

best mortgage program for homeowners have discov- however, is provide the nec- 

The workshop will be held the homebuying process. The your needs. ered the only solution they essary funds to pay the taxes 

at The Citizens Bank, 1200 staffat NHS is unique in their Advanced registration is will ever need. when they are due. In most 

Hancock St., Quincy Center, approach to obtaining down required and space is lim- The solution comes in the cases, the participant can do use to satisfy their property 

from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. At- payment and closing costs ited. A $10 refundable regis- form of the FHA program for this by establishing a "line of tax requirements, partici- 

assistance as well as rehab tration fee is required. reverse mortgages. The pro- credit" which will be avail- 
gram allows homeowners 62 able to pay the property taxes. 
Contact Debbie Kidd at years of age and older with This completely eliminates 
(6 1 7) 770-2387 for more in- little or no mortgage remain- 
formation and to register for ing to draw tax-free income 
the workshop. from their home equity with- 

out requiring repayment for 

Save Gas & imoiiey ... ^^ lo^g ^^ t^gy occupy the 

. . . Shop locally home. 



tendance at both workshops 
is mandatory to receive the 
homebuying certificate 
which is required by all lend- 
ers to qualify for the many 
different mortgage options 



grants for theirclients, which 
are available throughout the 
entire South Shore area. 
Don't miss this opportunity 
to find out how you or some- 



Unfortunately, the pro- crease in value by about 1% 
gram can't do anything to per year. As long as a partici- 
pant has an available line of 
credit, the account will con- 
tinue to grow. 

By providing the home- 
owner with another source 
of income which they can 



pants are able to use their 
fixed income for living ex- 
penses and do not have to 
worry about setting aside 



the need for homeowners to 




Real Estate ABC's from 
Real Estate Solutions 

A. Acutely accurate market 
analysis 

B. Brokerage experience and easy 
to work with 

C. Customer service beyond 
compare-really! 

Please call Bill Riddle 

617-472-8181 

or visit www.Afinehome.com 



make monthly installment money every month to meet 

payments toward their prop- the property tax needs. This 

erty taxes. translates into extra income 

This "line ofcredit" is very to use for thejjurpose of liv- 

similartoa"homeequityline ing. 




STAMOS & STAMOS 

747 East Squantuni Street, 
Squantum, MA 02 1 71 

[fe] (617) 328-9400 






A GREAT COMPANY TO DO BUSINESS WITH 




When Buyinii or Sellini>, Think... 




GUSCONFALONE 
Real Estate Consultant 



Annex Realty, Inc. 

49 Beale St., Quincy, MA 02170 
617-472-4330 ext. 310 
Call Gus for a FREE 
Market Evaluation Jmi 

niMLS 



of your property 



Centurion 
Broker 



of credit" which one might 
get at a bank with two no- 
table exceptions. Unlike a 
bank line of credit, an indi- 
vidual can draw as much as 
they wish from the line up to 



Although this program 
has been very popular na- 
tionally, many eligible par- 
ticipants still do not realize 
that this alternative is avail- 



their predetermined limit and able to them. The majority of 

never make a monthly pay- those who are seeking this 

ment on the account. program so far have indicated 

The second difference is that paying property taxes 

that the reverse mortgage line each year is a major consid- 

of credit will actually in- eration in their decision to 

look into the program. 




Buying or Selling? 

Let me assist you with 
all your Real Estate needs! 



Bill MIITON 
617-306-0668 



ERA CENTRAL REAL ESTAH 

128 Mayor McGrath Highway, 
Quincy, MA 02169 

617-328-1312 
Fax:617-328-6775 



Grace Eng HELP WANTED Carol Cahill 



We need listings... 
Give one of us a call! 

Full time openings available 

for experienced agents 

Call for an interview. 

Conway 

^ REALTOR*' 

JACK CONWAY 
COMPANY, INC. 

Lynne Houghton^ Manager 
Free Market Analysis 

253 Beale Street, Quincy 
617-479-1500 



Sandra Fennelly Beverly Joyce Ernie Light 



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■CENTURY 21 

ANNEX REALTY, INC. 

49 BEALE STREET, QUINCY, MA 
472-4330 1-800-345-4614 

Across from Blockbuster & Quincy T 




QUINCY 

Presenting a Penns Hill offering. Weil maintained 2 family 
with separate utilities, easy care siding and 2 car garage. 
This could be the investment home you have been waiting 
for. $299,000. 




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When you're #1 you can do things others can't. 

See all our listings at: www.c21annex.coin 



PMI - GONE 



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Appraiser will 

remove your 

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Call Art Foley 

at Century 21 

Annex 

472-4330 



Seniors often worry that 
the expenses of 

homeownership will force 
them to lower their standard 
of living. This is a choice 
most older homeowners sim- 
ply to not want to make. With 
the reverse mortgage pro- 
gram the participants are able 
to make their property tax 
payments without having to 
use their fixed income re- 
sources. 

For more information, 
contact Jeffrey Moulton of 
Wells Fargo Home Mortgage 
at (800) 950-3297. 



FLAVIN & FLAVIN 

Beal Estate 




JOHN FLAVIN 

Serving the Real 

Estate Needs 

of Quincy 

Family Owned 
Since 1925 

617-479-1000 



mvm 




Buying, Selling or Investing? 

Call Tom McFarland 

For All Your 
Real Estate Answers 

QUINCY 328-3200 



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Full Real Estate Service... 

All Under One Roof 

South Shore Homes & Investment Ppopcptics 



Thursday, August 3, 2000 Tbe Quincy Sun Page 15 

Commercial Sales ft Leasing • Residential Home Sales 
Real btate Auctions • Property Management 




Quincy - 

Centre Street West Condo Complex... 1st unit 
available sine 1996! Tri-level townhouse, 6 rooms, 
2 bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths, private yard, customized 
interior with fine woodwork & marble fireplace, 
tile floors in kitchen & bath, short walk to train. 
$233,000... Call Kam Lee 





Quincy - 

2'family home, great income 
property, newer windows and 
furnace. 18-20 Moore St. 
$289,900... Call Kelle Sutliff 




Braintree - 

Former architects home blends 
modern updates with classic charac- 
ter. 6 rooms, 3 bedrroms, 2 baths, 
beautiful private backyard, alarm 
system, customized and spotless! 
181 Allen St., $239,900... 
Call Kelle Sutliff 



Weymouth - 

2-family in a great location, needing 
a little TLC, but worth the invest- 
ment! 14 Sea St., $194,900... 
Call Kelle Sutliff 




Quincy " 

Live in a condo that feels like a 
home! Town house style, 4 rooms, 2 
bedrooms, eat- in kitchen, 1 1/2 
baths, private deck, separate 
entrance garage, low fees, small 
animals accepted. 12 Fallon Ct. 
$179,900... Call Kelle Sutliff 




Weymouth ' 

Single family home with 2 bed- 
rooms, hardwood floors, kitchen 
with sliders onto deck that over- 
looks the lake, 1-car garage under. 
$179,900... Call Kelle Sutliff 



Call 61 7-479-9000 

Fop More Information 




Weymouth - 

Looking for a money maker? 
4-family home within walking 
distance to the T. 28 Pond St. 
$299,900... Call Kelle Sutliff 



Office, Retail & Flex Space 



Foster Street, Qidiicy^ MA 




Great Site for Legal 
Professionals 

• 1 ,500 SF of 2nd floor office space 

• 2,000SFof basement space 

• Located next to Quincy District 
Courthouse 

• On-site parking with municipal 
lot across the street 

• For Lease at $16/SF 




Design Your Own Space in this New Quincy Development 

• Up to 19,000 SF of new Class A build-to-suit office/retail space for lease 

• Outstanding traffic counts... peak hr. traffic flow in excess of 2,000 vehicles 

• Established retail neighborhood features several major retailers, 
including Walmart, Roche Brothers, Bradlees and Walgreens 

• Convenient access by car or public transportation, ample parking available 



More Commercial Opportunites . ^ ^ 

Quincy - 5,000 SF office building, high visibility along Hancock St. $399,000 

Quincy - 2,200 SF of office space, on-site parking. $15/SF gross or $2,750/mo. 

Quincy - Office space used as recording studio, 5,345 SF, completely renovated. 
Business B zoned. $325,000 

Quincy ' 3,000 SF retail building located at entrance to shopping facility. Great 
potential! Reduced to sell at $399,000 

Dorchester - Renovated mill building, exposed brick & wood beams, 1,000 SF 
available. $15/SF 

Dorchester - New office space, 1,875 SF on 2nd fl., 1,875 SF on 3rd fl., new 
construction, open floor plan. $20/SF 

Dorchester - 2,51 1 SF of vacant land, used for flower sales and Christmas tree 
stand. $50,000 

Weymouth - Residential-style building with Business-1 zoning, 7 total rooms, 
6,300 SF lot, Route 18 location. $179,900 




Daniel J. 

nn &Co.,Iiie. 

Visit These & Other Great Listings at www.djflynn.com 



Commercial Sales & Leasing • Residential Home Sales 

Real Estate Auctions • Property Management 

32 Chestnut Street • Quincy • MA • 02169 

Tel. 617.479.9000 • Fax 617.770.0443 



^-€ 



^rr 






Page 16 The Qiilncy Bvux ThurwiaytAupist 3, 2000 



' • 



My Patients Speak For Themselves... 



I 

"Sciatica had severely limited my ability to do even the most com- 1 
monplace activity. A friend recommended Dan Karp. After my ■ 
first session, the pain decreased substantially After only six ses- _ 
sions, I was virtually pain-free" - Karen Quigley Cohasset, MA I 

• Stop Smoking • Weight Loss • Pain & Stress • Injury I 




it 



Some Insurances Accepted 
acudan. baweb.com 



DANIEL S. KARP, UC. AC. 

12 DIMMOCK STREET, QUINCY 
(617)471-5577 

Monday-Friday 9am-6pm 



I 
I 
I 

I 



I 

J 



Mass, Has A Blood Emergency 

The Only Way Out Is To Donate 




Stephen P. Tobias 

Board Certified Hearing 

Instrument Specialist 



Hearing aid 

"Tips from Tobias" 

"How I clean my ears? 

You normally "clean" things 
that are dirty. Believe it or not 
wax is not dirt. It is a protective 
secretion from mother nature. 
It helps keep out infection and 
insects. It is produced in the 

outer portion of the ear canal, 
atxjut 3/8" into your ear. When I 
see wax next to someones eardrum it usually spells "Q- 
tip" or some other brand swab. Wax must be put there 
by some means, swabs, bobby pins, keys, you name it. 
When the ear itches people will stick just about ainything 
in their ear to stop it, sometimes damaging the eardrum 
or canal wall. If your ear itches try to scratch it by 
mbbing behind your ear. Ear wax normally migrates 
outweu'd, so don't push it back in, let nature take its 
course. Unfortunately in rare cases the ear produces 
too much , too little or too dry wax. Ask your doctor 
(preferrably an ear doctor) about your specific problem. 
If you need ttie name of one in your area feel free to call 
me. Remember ear canals are not dirty they are 
probably the cleanest most germ-free part of your bodyl 
Now you go and spread the news! Steve 

Stephen Tobias Hearing Center 

488 Quincy Ave, Quincy, MA 021 69 (next to 

shipyard) 

Have any topics for upcoming "Tips"? Write or call 

617 770-3395 



It's simple mathematics. 

At one time or another, 60 
percent of Americans will 
need blood or blood prod- 
ucts. But only about five per- 
cent of our country's popula- 
tion donates blood. 

And now, dire predictions 
made two years ago are com- 
ing true. In 1998, the Na- 
tional Blood Data Resource 
Center predicted that declines 
in donated blood and strongly 
increased demand for blood 
and blood products would 
result in a shortage of crisis 
proportions in 2000. 

And sure enough, halfway 
through 2000 we are seeing 



such as orthopedic proce- while the demand continues and are 1 7 years or older are 
dures and organ transplants, or even increases. eligible to donate. Federal 
and treatment of the aging This summer, the Massa- regulations require that do- 
baby boomer and World War chusetts Medical Society has nors wait 56 days between 



I! generations. Truly won- 
derful, life-saving things are 
being done with blood. 

Ironically, it is the same 
generation of people (those 
who lived through World 
War II) who for many years 
have formed the corps of 
blood donors. But the onset 
of health problems such as 
heart disease, high blood 
pressure and diabetes are lim- 



taken on a special project to donations, 
help recruit more blood do- Even if you are unable to 

nors, so your doctor may very donate yourself, there are 

well be talking with you about ways you can help. If a friend 



the prospect. 

Allan Kliman, M.D., a 
former medical director of 
the Red Cross in Massachu- 
setts who heads up the MMS 
Committee on Transfusion 
Medicine, notes that there is 
only one way to reverse a 



reports of a serious shortfall iting the numbers of people growing shortage. 



of blood — far beyond the who can now donate, 
annually anticipated summer While blood donors are 

shortages — despite the best needed throughout the year. 



efforts of Massachusetts hos- 
pitals and the American Red 
Cross. 

Blood use has increased 
in the last few years for a 
number of reasons, includ- 
ing hospitals performing 
more sophisticated surgeries 



they are most urgently m 
short supply during holidays 
and in the summer. It is dur- 
ing these times that the num- 
ber of donations declines 



"The blood banks can't 
solve this problem on their 
own," he says. "The only 
solution is by finding more 
volunteers to donate more 
blood." 

Most healthy people who 



or relative requires a blood 
transfusion, you can help re- 
cruit suitable donors. 
Chances are, you know some- 
one who would be happy to 
donate blood, if only they 
were asked. Donating blood 
is one of the best gifts you 
can give. It only takes about 
an hour, and it costs you ab- 
solutely nothing. 

For more information on 
where you can give blood, 
contact the Massachusetts 
Medical Society at (78 1 ) 434- 
73-11 or on the Web at 



weigh at least 110 pounds www.massmed.org. 

The Season For Herbal Bounty 



Smoking, 



Our beauty and health can Meanwhile, people have used gj-g found in numerous herbal 

benefit from the Earth's aloe vera to help soothe skin products ranging from lotions 

and echinaceau to help the and creams to soaps and 

body fend off toxins in the shampoos. It's only natural 



American Heart 
AssociadonJ 



^ 



WE'RE FIGHTING FOR YOUR LIFE 



bounty. 

For example, the botani- 
cal goldenseal has been 
known for its anti-inflamma- 



environment. 

Because of these proper- 



tory and antimicrobial prop- ties, many Americans have 
erties for thousands of years, embraced the healing pow- 



Helping Your Child 
Get a Healthy Start on Life 

Most major insurances accepted 
Caring, professional staff 
24-hour emergency care 




Dr. George Horn. Pediatrician 

Dr. Ingrid Henar, Pediatrician 

Annette Radzevicti. Family Nurse Practitioner 

(617)773-7754 

Quincy Medical Center 
114 Whitwell Street 



ra 



IV. 



South 
Suburban 
Pediatrics 



\_Jv. (^nrlstlne |— |ubeT» 
i^^hvopvaciov 

You've heard how good Chiropractic care isfor you. 
Discover for yourself just how good you can feel. 

1250 Hancock Street, Quincy 

at Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates 
(617) 774-0595 or (617) 774-0611 

Provider for: Harvard Pilgrim, 'Rifts, Blue 

Cross, Neighborhood Health, Medicare, 

Mass Health, Motor Vehicle, 

Worker's Compensation and others. 



that herbal toothpaste would 
catch their attention. 

With this in mind, 
Rembrandt has created a line 
of herbal toothpastes and 
mouthwashes that can help 
enhance an increasingly natu- 
ral beauty and health regi- 
men. 

"Herbs may be a logical 
addition to oral care prod- 
ucts since they have proven 
so beneficial in other per- 
sonal care products," said 
Rodger Kurthy, D.M.D., 
Southern California dentist 
and dental researcher. 

To learn more about 
herbal remedies or 
Rembrandt Naturals Tooth- 
paste, call 1-800-548-3663 
or visit 

www.rembrandt.com. 



Manet 
Community 
Health Center, Inc 




Est.1979 



Providing primary health care for all ages. 

Serving most insurances, HMO 's, the uninsured. 
Medical, Lab, Nutrition, Smoking and HIV Services 

New Internal Medicine office at Quincy Medical Center 
Providing services in Cantonese & Mandarin 



^,S»t>N4Q. 




@ Houghs Neck- 1193 Sea St 
Snug Harbor- 9 Bicknell St. 
North Quincy- 110 W.Squantum 
Quincy Medical Center- 114 Whitwell St. 

New number 376-2088 



Children 
Teens 



ROBERT AZRAK, Ed.D. 

Licensed Psychologist 
Mass Bay Counseling, 36 Weston Ave., Quincy 

(617) 786-0137 



Adults 
Families 



www.psyrca.com 



COMPLHE FAMIIY HEALTH CARE SERVICES 

• Treatment of Colds, Flus, etc 

• Annual Physical Examinations 

• Minor Emergency Care 

• Immunlzatlon/Pre-Marltal Testing 

• Preventive Health Screening 

• Occupational Health Services 



South Shore Health Center Lmnhmn 

759 Granite St.. Braintree. MA 02184 ^ i,<<n„ui'hi/,n 

(781)848-1950 . ' ■ (fz/i. ( ,m,(//,w /.,'o 

DAVID S. EGILMAN. MD, MPH, MEDICAL DIRECTOR 




( tlnni III I'.'niiiiil 



'""WW 



wmmmmmmm 



mtm 



Thursday, August 3, 2000 Tbe Quls&cy Sun Page 17 



Sports 



Granite Strike Early, 
Often In 27-8 Win 



By CHRIS POISSON 

This time, Mike Thomas 
was on time and the Quincy 
Granite wasted no time. 

After rally ing in the fourth 
quarter for a 15-14 win over 
the Mass Havoc in Week 3, 
Quincy struck quicker and 
more often in Sunday 
afternoon' s 27-8 win over the 
Charlestown Townies (2-1). 

"We got off to a quick 
start but we kind of stumbled 
at the end of the game," said 
coach Ken McPhee. "I think 
we got a little complacent 
after getting a big lead." 

Quincy (3-1) will try to 
extend its winning streak to 
four games Saturday night 
when it heads north to take 
on the Maine Pride (2-1). 

Thomas picked up where 
he left off against the Havoc, 
throwing for over 200 yards 
with four touchdown passes 
and no interceptions. As he 
gains more experience each 
week, the passing game 
should only become more 
explosive. 

The ground game, on the 
other hand, concerns 
McPhee. As it struggles to 
get going, the top man in the 
backfield has been Thomas, 
who has two of the team's 
three rushing touchdowns 
this season. He rushed for a 
team-high 30 yards against 
the Townies. 

"We didn't run the ball as 
well as we would have liked 
to," McPhee said. "Eventu- 
ally, people will be teeing off 
and going after the quarter- 
back. If [Thomas] didn'thave 
good feet, we'd be in trouble. 
But a lot of it has to do with 
the different lineman used 
each week. We don't have 
any continuity." 

Defensively, the Granite 
continue to shine as 
Charlestown turned the ball 
over five times and managed 
only one touchdown late in 
the game. 

"We're rotating guys in 
and out like a turnstile," 
McPhee said. "There's no 
question we're much more 
balanced than last year." 

After missing the first half 
against the Havoc, Thomas 
clocked in early against the 
Townies, hitting tailback 
Jackson Vetiac on the third 



lASn KN lOOIHAI.L I.I.ACil I 



Eastern Conference 

W L 

Marlboro Shamrocks 2 

Middleboro Cobras 2 

QuincyGranite 3 1 

Charlestown Townies 2 1 

BostonCowboys 2 1 

Providence Prowlers l l 

Randolph Oilers 3 

Northern Conference 

W L 

MainePride 2 1 

MassHavoc 2 .1 

Springfield Blitzin' Bears 2 1 

Hyannis Hurricanes 2 2 

Clinton Irish Blizzard 2 

Western Mass Machine 2 



T 


PF 


PA 





61 


21 





41 


28 





79 


42 





50 


43 





48 


38 





16 


30 





25 


39 




T 


PF 


PA 





100 


41 





80 


36 





102 


57 





46 


51 





27 


55 








120 




play from scrimmage for a 
touchdown on an 80-yard 
screen. 

On its next series, Tho- 
mas hooked up with wideout 
Bill MacDougall for a 38- 
yard TD strike, giving 
Quincy a 14-0 lead in the 
first quarter. 

"There' s no question why 
he was a Division 1 football 
player," said McPhee on Tho- 
mas ' progression. "He has a 
lot of talent. He throws the 
ball extremely well." 

Quincy went up 21-0 
when Bo Garcia hauled in a 
25-yard TD pass. Thomas 
later found MacDougall 
again for a 34-yard score, the 
fourth time this season the 
two have combined for six 
points. 

U 
EFL Honors 

MacDougall and John 
Skabeikis earned Eastern 
Conference Player of the 
Week honors for Week 3 
(July 22) after their perfor- 
mance in the Granite's win 
over the Mass Havoc. 

MacDougall, named of- 
fensive player of the week, 
hauled in two TD passes to 
lead a comeback in the fourth 
quarter. He finished with 
three catches for 69 yards. 



Skabeikis earned defen- 
sive honors with three of the 
team's four interceptions. His 
last interception came late in 
the game to seal the win. 

Against Charlestown 

Skabeikis intercepted his 

fifth pass of the year, which 

leads the league. 

□ 

Higgins Update 

Quarterback Liam 
Higgins, who has been out 
all season with head injury, 
is expected to return in a 
couple of weeks. 

With Thomas playing 
well in his absence, his re- 
turn figures to leave McPhee 
with a quarterback contro- 
versy. Not so. 

"When he's back, we'll 
have two great quarterbacks. 
I feel confident with each 
one," McPhee said. 

□ 
An Old Friend 

Jim Timothy, who left the 
Granite about two weeks ago 
in search of more playing 
time, scored Charlestown's 
only touchdown when he 
rushed one in from a couple 
yards out. 

A linebacker for Quincy, 
Timodiy played two- ways for 
Charlestown Sunday. 



QUINCY YOUTH FOOTBALL camp is being held this week at Faxon Park for all Hve teams 
in the league. Over 200 kids participated in the opening day of drills Monday. The camp is 
run by Jack Raymer (above right), former Quincy High School coach and current Stonehill 
College coach, Greg Burke (Stoughton coach) and Frank Tricani (Braintree athletic direc- 
tor) along with the coaching staffs at Quincy and North Quincy. 

(Quincy Sun Photos) 




DAN MORRELL, offensive/defensive line coach at Quuicy High School and new president of 
Quincy Youth Football, instructs a player through a form tackling drill at Monday's opening 
day of camp. 



Changes To Granite Schedule 



(;ramti: 


s(()RiN(; Li: 


ai)i:rs 


Players 


TD 


2PAT 


PAT 


FG 


PTS 


MacDougall, Bill 


4 


1 








26 


Thomas, Mike 


2 











12 


Vetiac, Jackson 


2 











12 


Garcia, Bo 


1 


1 








8 


Doherty, Paul 








7 





7 


Lynch, Bernard 


1 











, 6 


Vaughn, Brian 


1 











6 



Joe Hern Fourth In 
National Wrestling Tourney 



Joe Hern of Quincy re- 
cently placed fourth in his 
weight class in the asso- 
ciation division at this 
summer's AAU National 
Scholastic Duals Wrestling 
Tournament in Orlando. 



Hern wrestled with a Mas- 
sachusetts invitational team 
at the tournament, which 
drew 56 teams from 37 states. 

Last season, he finished 
with a 19-3 record in dual 



place in the Division 1 state 
tournament. 

Hem is entering his jun- 
ior year at Quincy High 
School and has been se- 
lected as a tri-captain for 
the 200()-2()01 season. 



The Quincy Granite's 
schedule has changed as a 
result of last week's disband- 
ment of the New Hampshire 
Chargers franchise from the 
Eastern Football League. 

The bye week scheduled 
for this weekend has been 
moved to Aug. 26 to replace 
the New Hampshire game, 
and Quincy will now travel 
to Maine Saturday to take on 
the Pride at 7 p.m. 

The following two weeks 
will remain the same — a 
bye Aug. 12 and a home game 
against Maine Aug. 19. 

In the off-season, the two 
teams from New Hampshire 
(Rochester and Concord) 

NQHS 

Physicals 

Aug. 21, 24 

Physicals for interested 
aihletcs at North Quincy 
High School will be held 
Monday. Aug. 2 1 andThurs- 
day. Aug. 24 from 8:30 a.m. 
to 12 p.m. at the NQHS 
Nurse's OlTicc. 



Ql INC ^ S( HKDULK 


Sat. 


7/8 


BOSTON COWBOYS 


20-8 L 


Sat. 


7/15 


@ Hyannis Hurricanes 


29-0 W 


Sat. 


7/22 


MASS HAVOC 


15-14W 


Sua 


7/30 


©Charlestown Townies 


27-8 W 


Sat. 


8/5 


@ Maine 


7:00 


Sat. 


8/12 


BYE 




Sat. 


8/19 


MAINE PRIDE 


7:00 


Sat. 


8/26 


BYE 




Fri. 


9/1 


©Randolph Oilers 


8:00 


Sat. 


9/9 


©Marlboro Shamrocks 


7:00 


Sat. 


9/16 


MIDDLEBORO COBRAS 


7:00 


Sat. 


9/23 


PROVIDENCE PROWLERS 


7:00 



merged to form the Chargers. 
But the new team got off to a 
horrid start, dropping all three 
of its games in which it was 
outscorcd, 102-12. 



The Chargers' breakup 
leaves 13 teams in the EfT^ 
— seven in the Eastern Con- 
ference and six in the North- 
ern Conference. 



Cerebral Palsy Golf Outing 



Cerebral Palsy of Massa- 
chusetts will hold a Golf 
Outing Monday. Aug. 21 at 
Presidents' GoU Course with 
a shot-gun style start at 8 a.m. 

Title sponsor is South 
Shore Savings Bank. 

Foursomes' including a 
hole sponsorship is $395: in- 
dividual golfers are .S75. A 
Neu Fni^iaiid style clambake 
will lollim at I p.m. 



For reservations, call 6 1 7- 
479-7443. exl. 101. 



Quit Smoking, 



WE'RE FIGHTING 
FOR YOUR LIFE 

American Heart f^ 
Ass()ciation«^y 



I 



*^flHFi^lH!W5«rT!!^rW!WWI!!WH)i.4, .!..-».«.. 



» • •» m^.- 






Page 18 Tli.e Qulnoy Sun Thursday, August 3, 2000 



VsXKX 
JO XX V ' 




'^ifH*\ >AfS- y '^>' 



O'ROURKE FINISHED in first place in the Senior Division of the Street Hockey Tournament. 
Front row, from left, are Ryan Tobin, Steve McGrath, Matt Tobin, Pat Casper. Back row, Tim 
Watson, Kyle Carmody, Kevin Gaughan (leader), Pat Maxey and Chris Tufo. 




MONTCLAIR GRABBED the top spot in the Junior Division of the Street Hockey Tournament. 
Fnmt row, from left, are Frank Sorrento, Ryan Donovan, Jimmy Fitzpatrick, John Ridge. Back 
row, Paul Garvey (leader), Stephen Zorkers, Matt McHugh, Shaun Lynch, Chris Garvey and 
Kristin Bowes (leader). 



Recreation Dept. Crowns 
Street Hockey Champs 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department recently held its 
annual Street Hockey Tour- 
nament at Montclair play- 
ground with over 75 children 
participating from seven of 
the 19 playgrounds through- 
out the city. 

The event was run by 
sports specialists Ryan Bell, 
Patrick McDonough, Ryan 
Herlihy and Geoff Meade, 
and they were assisted by 
several playground leaders. 

The following teams won 
first place in the tournament: 

Midget Boys: (Faxon 
Park) Mark Gilboby, Zack 
Helfrich, Matt McGue, Matt 



Rodriguez, Chris Randall, 
Kyle Craig and John 
Magliozzi. Coached by Sean 
Fitzpatrick, Caitlin Brillo and 
Laura McEvoy. 

Runner-up: (Squantum) 
Andrew McCarthy, Jeremy 
Mock, Tyler Costa, Nick 
Hutchings, Sean Harrington 
and Jackie Kremidas. 
Coached by Joe MacRitchie. 

Junior Boys: (Montclair 
Playground) Frank Sorrento, 
Ryan Donovan, Jimmy 
Fitzpatrick, John Ridge, 
Stephen Zorkers, Matt 
McHugh, Shaun Lynch and 
Chris Garvey. Coached by 
Paul Garvey, Kristin Bowes 



and Adam Woo. 

Runner-up: (LeBreque 
Playground) Matt Giordani, 
Lammy Papalambros, Brian 
Sullivan, Jeff Giordani, 
Teddy Walsh and Mike 
Leane. Coached by John 
Katsarikas and Caitlin 
Nichol. 

Senior Boys: (O'Rourke) 
Ryan Tobin, Steve McGrath, 
Matt Tobin, Pat Casper, Tim 
Watson, Kyle Carmody, Pat 
Maxey and Chris Tufo. 

Runner-up: (Squantum) 
John O'Driscoll, Paul Gra- 
ham, Tim Duggan, Mike 
Garland, John Cooper and 
Tom Peterson. 



Tony King, Ryan Doyle 
Featured In Hockey Showcase 



Two Quincy residents are 
competing in Hockey Night 
In Boston's 26th annual 
Showcase of Stars tourna- 
ment held at Merrimack 
College's S. Peter Volpe 
Complex in North Andover 



and the Icenter in Salem, N.H. 
Tony King, a junior at 
Catholic Memorial, and Ryan 
Doyle, a senior at B.C. High, 
are forwards on the South 
Shore team, which is off to a 
2-2 start. 



The 1 8-team tournament 
began last Thursday and first 
round action ends Aug. 12. 
Over 400 of the nation's top 
scholastic players from 30 
states and Canada are par- 
ticipating in the event. 



Ryan Corbett Cycling 
To Help Fight Lung Disease 



Ryan Corbett of Quincy Trail, the Old King's High- 



will be riding in the 16th an- 
nual Autumn Escape Bike 
Trek Sept. 15-17 to raise 
awareness and funds for the 
American Lung Association. 

"I like to challenge my- 
self and see how far I can ride 
and this is for a good cause," 
said Corbett, who will be ped- 
aling from Plymouth to 
Provincetown for the first 
time. 

Over the three-day, 1 60- 
mile trek, cyclists will tour 
the Cape Cod canal, the 
Falmouth Shining Sea Bike 



way and the Cape Cod Na- 
tional Seashore. 

"What is unique and spe- 
cial about this event is that 
these people come together 
for a weekend united in mak- 
ing a difference in the fight 
against lung disease," said 
Martha Waldron, executive 
director of the American 
Lung Association. 



Cyclists must raise a mini- 
mum of $300 to participate. 

Money raised through 
pledges and donations will 
qualify cyclists to win prizes 
such as a L.L. Bean gift cer- 
tificate, a 4-day, 3-night stay 
at the Sonesta Beach Resort 
in Bermuda, and more. 

For more information 
about the Autumn Escape 
Bike Trek or how you can 



Each cyclist pays a $40 fight lung disease, call the 

registration fee and raises a American Lung Association 

minimum of $400 in pledges, of Greater Norfolk County at 

A two-day Saturday to Sun- (508) 668-6729, or e-mail at 

day option is also available, lungusa@worldnet.att.net. 



REATION 




Shea's Bertoni Memorial 
Golf Tournament Sept. 11 



The Bill Shea's 12th an- 
nual Bertoni Memorial Golf 
Tournament will be held 
Monday, Sept. 1 1 at the 
Halifax Country Club to ben- 
efit the Quincy Animal Shel- 
ter. 

The tournament will tee- 
off at 8 a.m. The event will 
also feature various golfing 
contests and raffles, such as a 



longest drive, closest to the 
pin and hole-in-one for a 
chance to win a new Buick. 
There will be an awards lun- 
cheon following the tourna- 
ment. 

Proceeds will be used to 
feed, pay medical bills and 
rehab the shelter for the ani- 
mals. The tournament will 
be run with the help of Siro's 



Restaurant, Quincy Animal 
Shelter, Bill Shea of Shea's 
Coriam, Jeff Sweeney of 
Sweeney Brothers Home for 
Funerals and Sue Deegan. 

Those interested in play- 
ing in the tournament, or 
would like more information, 
are asked to call Bill Shea at 
(617) 326-1266 or Sue 
Deegan at (617) 376-2001. 



5 Residents Place 
At Bay State Games 



FAXON PARK took first place in the Midget Division at the Quincy Recreation Department's 
recent Street Hockey ToumamenL Front row, from left, are Mark GUboby, Zack Hdfrich, Matt 
McGoe. Back row. Scan Fitzpatrick (leader). Matt Rodriguez, Chris Randall, Kyle Craig, John 
MaglMzaandiCattlin BriOo^leader) 



Four Quincy residents 
placed in the track and field 
competition and one in judo 
at the recent 1 9th annual Bay 
State Summer Games. 

In track and field, Kyle (37'02),KatyMercuriocame 
Piazza grabbed the second in fifth in the girls scholastic 






^^^^m 



spot in the boys scholastic high jump (4'08), and Jeff 
shot put (49'07) and finished Hunt finished sixth in the 
third in the discus ( 1 32' 1 1 ). boys scholastic long jump 

Margaret Crumety won (18*00.5). 
thewomen'sopenuiplejump jn judo. Ken Hede took 

second pl^e in the boys ages 
10-12, 68 pounds di visMo. 



^mim 



■IF. I 



■^ 



i^^'f^p-T^^^^ 



■i^MaiHMaRiiipwH^r^MVpi 



Thursday, August 3, 2000 Tbe Quincy Sun Page If 



Patrick White Inspires 
Pan-Mass Cyclists 



On Saturday and Sunday, 
Patrick White of Quincy will 
be inspiring a group of cy- 
clists at the 21st annual Pan- 
Massachusetts (PMC) bi- 
cycle fund-raiser to benefit 
the Jimmy Fund at Dana- 
Farber Cancer Institute. 

Through the PMC's new 
Pedal Partner program, 9- 
year-old White is being 
paired with the MFS Invest- 
ment Management team of 
cyclists. The Pedal Partner 
program matches children 
who are Jimmy Fund Clinic 
patients with an individual 
PMC bicyclist or team. 

By being paired with a 
patient, cyclists can focus on 
a real person as one of the 
reasons they spend countless 
hours training in the months 
leading up to the grueling 
two-day, 200-mile ride 
across Massachusetts. 

White was diagnosed with 
rhabdomyosarcoma, a soft 
tissue form of cancer, this 



past November. He is cur- 
rently undergoing chemo- 
therapy and radiation treat- 
ments at the Jimmy Fund 
Clinic. 

"This new program offers 
the children and PMC cy- 
clists a personal connection 
to one another," said Lisa 
Scherber, Jimmy Fund Clinic 
activities coordinator. "Not 
only do the children inspire 
the riders, but the riders in- 
spire the children — the chil- 
dren realize they have some- 
one special, a friend, riding 
for them." 

The MFS Investment 
Management team raised 
$6 1 0,000 for the Jimmy Fund 
last year, which included 
MFS sponsorship donation, 
the team ' s fundraising efforts 
and a corporate match. This 
year, with the help of a match- 
ing grant from MFS, the team 
hopes to raise $700,000 in 
honor of White to support 
cancer research. 



"We have 52 riders and 
more than 50 volunteers," 
said Karen Brooks, PMC 
project manager for MFS. 
"Each has personal reasons 
for participating in the PMC, 
but being paired with a 
Jimmy Fund Clinic patient 
gives us a person to focus on 
as a team — a person who is 
benefiting from our efforts 
right now." 

The Pan-Massachusetts 
Challenge, presented by MFS 
Investment Management, is 
the nation's oldest and most 
successful bicycle fund- 
raiser. Last year, more than 
2,500 PMC riders contrib- 
uted a record $8.7 million to 
the Jimmy Fund, bringing the 
PMC's total contribution 
over 20 years to almost $43 
million. This year's goal is to 
raise $12 million. 

To contribute to the MFS 
Investment Management 
team or the PMC, call 1-800- 
WE-CYCLE. 



McDermotts Cycling 
In Mother's Memory 



Quincy City Councillor 
Patrick McDermott and 
Quincy Police Patrolman 
Chris McDermott will once 
again be riding together in 
this weekend's Pan-Massa- 
chusetts Challenge. 

Now in its 21st year, the 
PMC is a 194-mile bike ride 
from Sturbridge to 
Provincetown that serves as 
the largest single fund-raiser 
for the Jinuny Fund at Dana- 
Farber Cancer Institute, hav- 
ing raised over $55 million 
for cancer treatment and re- 
search. 

The McDermott brothers 
dedicate their ride every year 
to their mother, Patricia, who 
died from cancer in 1989. 

"There has been no greater 
pain in our lives than the loss 
of our mother," Patrick 
McDermott said. "Our fam- 



ily faced a very difficult time, 
but together we made it 
through by honoring her 
memory through this ride." 

"Cancer does not dis- 
criminate," Chris 
McDermott said. "It hits 
people of all ages and races. 
I unfortunately have seen 
first-hand the devastating ef- 
fects this disease has on fami- 
lies. I just want to try to do 
my part to see the day when 
we can declare a full victory 
over this disease." 

This will be Patrick's 
ninth and Chris' eighth ride. 
Together they have raised 
over $20,000 in their eight 
rides. In order to participate 
each rider must raise a mini- 
mum of $1,500. 

"This event is truly re- 
markable," Patrick 
McDermott said. "Over 



2,000 riders, 75,000 spon- 
sors and countless volunteers 
make PMC weekend a unique 
event." 

Patrick McDermott re- 
turned to the race last year 
after double-hip replacement 
surgery in 1998. He said the 
ride served as an inspiration 
for total recovery. 

"I was grateful to hear that 
cycling plays an important 
role in the recovery from hip 
replacement surgery," he 
said. "I made it my own per- 
sonal challenge to be back in 
the race last year, and fin- 
ished with my best personal 
time ever. To know that some 
young child is sitfing through 
chemotherapy treatment 
struggling for his life makes 
my own hospital stay look 
like summer camp. I ride for- 
those kids." 




SEVERAL WELCH HEALTHCARE & Retirement Group staff members, including Peter 
NeviUe (back row), Director of Marketing at Allerton House at Hancock Park Assisted Living 
Community in Quincy, recently participated in the South Shore Women's Business Golf 
Tournament at Atlantic Country Qub in Plymouth. His team, which finished in the top five, 
included (front row, from left) Kathleen Harrington, Harrington-Caron Insurance Agency; 
Diane DriscoU, CPA; and her brother, Tom Hogan. Welch Healthcare was a hole sponsor for 
the golfing event, and is a Sflver Sponsor of the South Shore Women's Business Network for 
the Year 2M0i. 




THE LADY GATORS fmished as the No. 8 team in the country at the recent Youth Basketball 
of America National Championship Tournament in Florida. Quincy residents Kathleen Hester 
(front row, fifth from left) and Bonnie Hirtle (back row, second from left) were standouts during 
the tournament. 

Bonnie Hirtle, Kathleen Hester 

Participate In National 
Youth Basketball Tournament 



Quincy residents Bonnie 
Hirtle and Kathleen Hester, 
members of the Lady Gators 
15-and-under basketball 
team, recently returned home 
from a 10-day trip to Polk 
County, Fla. where they par- 
ticipated in the Youth Bas- 
ketball of America National 
Championship Tournament. 

Representing Massachu- 
setts against teams from 14 
other states, some which had 
two or three years experi- 
ence, the Lady Gators were 
victorious in the end, finish- 
ing as the No. 8 team in the 
country. 

"They played harder and 



better than anyone had an- 
ticipated, exhibiting the heart 
of a champion, said coach 
Maria Pazyra. "They became 
stronger and more focused 
as each game went by." 

Leo Maloney, director of 
the Lady Gators organiza- 
tion, believes that if this team 
stays intact for the next two 
years, it could be one of the 
best teams in the country in 
the 17-and-under division. 

Hirtle and Hester, both 
second-year players, played 
major roles during the 40- 
game season and they were 
also standouts during the na- 
tional championship touma- 



ment. Hirtle is a three-point 
specialist and ou